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T//£ FLAGG-GA'A )' HOi'SE. 
(Description on Page 9.) 



THE I^EGISTER 



OF THE 



LvRR Historical Societv, 



LYNN, NASSACHUSCTTS, 



roQ Till: vitar 1900 




LYNN. MASS. 

THE NICHOL.S PRESS — THOS. P. NICHOLS. 
ICOI. 



nifLt^ 



Gift 
Tiie Society 

1 -'05 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1901 



President. 

BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Vice-President. 

HENRY F. TAPLEY. 

Preasurer. 

EUGENE A. PUTNAM. 

Recording Secretary. 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. . 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. George H. Martin. 

Henrv F. Tapley. Charles H. Newhall. 

William S. Burrill. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Philip A. Chase. James S. Newhall. 

Samuel A. Guilford. Charles F. Peirce. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. Eugene A. Putnam. 
RuFus Kimball. John Woodbury 

Earl A. Mower. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



COMMITTEES. 



Custodians. 



William S. Burrill. Earl A. Mower. 

George S. Bliss. Charles F. Peirce. 

Henry N. Comev. 



Finance. 

Philip A. Chase. Eugene A. Putnam. 

Luther S. Johnson. Henry B. Sprague. 



To Secure Publication of Old Toivn Records. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Rollin E. Harmon. 

Philip A. Chase. John Woodbury. 

Charles C. Fry. 



To Procure Infortnation from Elderly Citizens. 

Charles Buffum. David N. Johnson. 

S. Oliver Breed. Henry W. Johnson. 

Samuel A. Guilford. James H. Richards. 

Isaac K. Harris. William P. Sargent. 

George C. Herbert. William Stone. 



Lectures and Public Meetings. 

Henry F. Tapley. Sallie H. Hacker. 

William S. Burrill. Mary F. Little. 

Harriet K. Clough. Charles H. Newhall. 

MicAjAH P. Clough. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Louise S. Earle. May L. Sheldon. ■ 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Genealogy. 

John L. Parker. Enoch S. Johnson. 

Joanna A. Bubier. Melissa J. Littlefield. 

Harriet K. Clough. Harriet L. Matthews. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Emma F. P. Mower. 

Susan T. Hill. James S. Newhall. 

John C. Houghton. Sarah S. Norton. 

Anna L. Johnson. Mary A. Parsons. 



Publications and Printing. 

Howard Mudge Newhall. Henry F. Tapley. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. John G. Warner. 

James S. Newhall. 

Photography. 

George S. Bliss. Charles A. Cross. 

Edward F. Bacheller. John W. Darcy. 



Collection of Historical Relics. 

John Woodbury. Caroline P. Heath. 

Emma H. Breed. Mary A. Parsons. 

Stephen L. Breed. Charles F. Peirce. 

Sallie H. Hacker. Ida J. Tapley. 



Afarking Historical Locations. 

RuFus Kimball. Richard J. Nichols. 

Isaac F. Galloupe. John L. Parker. 

Arthur B. Mudge. James H. Richards. 



Necrology. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Israel A. Newhall. 

RuFus Kimball. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

George H. Martin. 



6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Coiitpilaiion of Local History. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Harkiet L. Matthews. 

John C. Houghton. Lsrael A. Newhall. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

David N. Johnson. Mary A. Parsons. 

George H. Martin. Elizabeth E. Rule. 



Frank B. Rowell. 
LiLLiE B. Allen. 
Luther Atwood. 
Charles Neal Barney 
Elmer F. Dwver. 
Mabel Earle. 



Geology and Botany. 

Philip Emerson. 
Jonathan W. Goouell. 
Henry W. Heath. 
Henry T. Lummus. 
James M. Marsh. 
"Myra D. Allen Ruppel 



Sallie H. Hacker. 
Ella D. Bartlett. 
Lydia C. Davis. 
Anna L. Dunn. 
Addie G. Fuller. 
Maria B. Harmon. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Mary M. Johnson. 
Virginia N. Johnson. 



Reception. 

Emma F. P. Mower. 
KiTTiE M. Newhall. 
Marion W. Newhall. 
Mary F. Pevear. 
Sarah F. Smith. 
Sarah S. Spinney. 
Ida J. Tapley. 
Ellen L. Warner. 
Jennie R. Woodbury. 



and Members of the Council. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BY-LAWS 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two years. 

ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second Wednes- 
day evening in January, time and place to be determined 
by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. A less number may 
adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direction of 
the Council, or President, and shAll be called upon the 
written request of twenty members. 

ARTICLE III. 

COUNCIL. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shairappoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate ofi^cers and agents, and make all necessary 
rules and regulations for itself and them. 



O LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Mce-President, 
Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and Treas- 
urer, who shall be elected annuall}^ by ballot, from the 
members of the Council. They shall perform the usual 
duties of such officers, and such other duties as the Coun- 
cil may require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July first of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularly called, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



THE FLAGG-GRAY HOUSE. 

The description of the Flagg-Gray House was contributed by 
Hon. Nathan Mortimer Hawkf.s. 



Most of the historic old houses of Lynn have heen 
destroyed or degraded to make room for the modern hust- 
ling city. 

Some remain, but as our lantern-slide pictures show 
they are mostly in remote parts of the old town — in the 
sections unaffected by the manufacturing impetus — in 
Saugus and Lynnfield. 

Along Boston Street — the old colonial highway — are 
a few spared monuments of the earlier days. One such is 
the house known as indicated by our caption. It stands at 
the angle of Marion Street, facing Boston Street, and still 
has a pleasant outlook in spite of its environment. 

This sketch may stimulate some student of leisure to 
trace the history of the house and its occupants. We know 
that it was the home of Dr. John Flagg, who was the son 
of Rev. Ebenezer Flagg of Chester, N.H. He was born 
in 1743, and graduated at Harvard in 1761. He came to 
Lynn in 1769, and entered upon the exacting duties of a 
physician, in which calling he evinced ability and won the 
fees and confidence of the community. He was an active 
patriot in the Revolution, and was chosen a member of the 
Committee of Safety in 1775, and commissioned as Colonel. 
In 1781, Governor John Hancock, the tirst Governor under 
the new Constitution, appointed him one of the first three 
Justices of the Peace in Lynn. 

He married Susanna Fowle, and they had one daughter, 
Susanna, who became the wife of Dr. James Gardiner, an 



lO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

equally noted physician and citizen. Dr. Flagg died May 

27. 1793- 

An earlier occupant of the house was Abraham Gray, 
a shoemaker, whose father, William Gray, was in 1750 
one of only three persons who carried on the shoe business 
in Lvnn so extensively as to employ journeymen. 

Under this roof-tree, on June 27, 1750, was born a 
son to Abraham Gray. The boy was named William, who 
became the richest and most successful merchant of his 
time in New England. He was familiarly known as 
" Billy " Gray, and in 1810 he became Lieutenant-Governor 
of Massachusetts, to which office he was re-elected in 1811. 
Mr. Gray died in Boston, November 3, 1825. From his 
five sons numerous and eminently respectable descendants 
claim origin. 

Among them is Mr. Justice Horace Gray of the United 
States Supreme Court, who, a few years since visited the 
birthplace of his grandfather. 

Mr. Gra3''s only daughter, Lucia, married Col. Sam- 
uel Swett. Her son was Rev. William Gray Swett, the 
pleasantly remembered pastor of thcUnitarian Society in 
Lynn from January i, 1840, to the day of his death, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1843. 

The gambrel or curb roof was a style of architecture 
common in England when our ancestors left there. It 
relieved the plainness of the roof lines, and it gave added 
height in the attic without carrying the frame of the build- 
ing up another story. 



IvYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 



REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL, Recording Secretary, 

At the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Societj-, at the Room of the Society. 
Wednesday Evening, January 9, igor. 



The fourth annual meeting finds the Society prosper- 
ous, increasing in numbers and in usefuhiess, and with 
many additions to its store of relics. Seventy-three new 
members were elected during the year. Tweh^e members 
have died: Charles B. Tebbetts, David H. Sweetser, E. 
Knowlton Fogg, Amos F. Breed, A. Amelia Hood, Kath- 
erine L. Johnson, John E. Hudson, S. Henderson Green, 
George W. Flanders, Martha L. Newhall, Edward M. 
Russell, and William F. Hill. The present membership 
of the Society is three hundred and seventv-seven. 

In January, a start was made on a fund for the Societv 
by the deposit of one hundred dollars in the Lvnn Institu- 
tion for Savings, an amount which had been saved bv 
careful management from the regular income from mem- 
bers. 

On Januarv 17, Messrs. Henrv F. Taple}*, Philip A. 
Chase, Nathan M. Hawkes, Benjamin F. Spinney and 
William S. Burrill, were appointed as a Committee to co- 
operate with citizens, or with the City Government, in 
arranging for the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of 
the institution of Lvnn as a city, which would occur in the 
month of Ma v. 

An interesting paper, illustrated by lantern slides, was 
read at the meeting of January 17, by Mr. Elmer F. Dwyer, 
who took as his subject, "The Geological Story of Lynn." 

On February 16, Mr. Charles J. II. Woodbury read 



12 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

a paper which had been prepared by Mr. Charles Buffum, 
on the subject of "The Habits, Customs, Style of Living, 
and Business Methods in Lynn early in this Century."' 

On March 8, Mr. Eugene A. Putnam presented a 
paper on the subject of " Old School Reading Books." 

On March 15, Afr. Charles Neal Barney read a paper 
on the subject of " The Laws and Judicial System of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony." 

On April 26, Mrs. Margaret E. Porter read a paper 
on the subject of •' East L^■nn or Woodend in the Early 
Part of the Century." 

On April 5, by invitation of the President, Benjamin N. 
Johnson, and Mrs. Johnson, the members were generously 
received and entertained at the room, the occasion being 
most enjoyable. The room had been tastefully arranged 
and decorated by a committee of ladies, music was pro- 
vided and a bountiful lunch was handsomely served, the 
special desire of the President being that the members 
might come together and become more fully acquainted. 

On May 13, 14 and 15. the citizens of Lynn celebrated 
the tiftieth anniversary of Lynn's institution as a city. 
There were religious services on Sunday, literary exercises 
on Monday, and a grand procession on Tuesdav. At the 
exercises in the Lynn Theatre, on the e\'ening of Mondav, 
the oration was given by Mr. Benjamin N. Johnson, the 
President of this Societ}'. The high temperature of Tues- 
day, the day of the parade, was remarkable for May, and 
was one of the hottest days ever recorded for so earlv a 
date. 

On June 9, an invitation was received for members to 
attend historical exercises at Dummer Academy, on June 13. 

An invitation was also received from the Methuen 
Historical Society, to visit that town with the other Histori- 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 3 

cal Societies of Essex County, on Monday, June i8. A 
goodly number of the members of the Society availed 
themselves of the invitation of the Methuen Society and 
passed a most enjoyable day in visiting the points of 
historic and artistic interest in that town. 

On September 13, members of the Society with 
friends took special electric cars for Wake Robin Spring, 
Lantern Rock and Dungeon Rock, in Lynn Woods. Hon. 
Robert S. Rantoul, President of the Essex Institute, Mr. 
Sidney Perley of the Essex Antiquarian, and Mrs. Osborn, 
Secretary of the Peabody Society, accompanied the mem- 
bers. The afternoon was most delightful for the excur- 
sion, which was made bv invitation of Hon. N. ^L Hawkes, 
the Chairman of the Lynn Park Commissioners, who had 
also provided lanterns and guide for those who wished to go 
into Dungeon Cave. Many availed themselves of the op- 
portunity. The Council had invited Mr. Philip A. Chase 
to make some historical remarks in regard to Dungeon 
Rock, which he did most interestingly to the large number 
present. Remarks were also made by Messrs. Benjamin 
N. Johnson, Robert S. Rantoul, Sidney Perley, Nathan 
M. Hawkes, Walter B. Allen, Isaac K. Harris, and others. 

On October 13, the members took a tramp in the Lynn 
Woods, visiting the Wolf Pits, Rocking Boulder, Weetamoo 
Cliff, Frog Boulder and Overlook Crag. Most of those 
who attended had never visited these points of interest. 
which made the occasion unusually interesting. 

On November 20, the second in the series of Lynn 
Views, prepared by the Committee on Photography, was 
given, with explanatory remarks by Howard Mudge New- 
hall. This second series of views was most creditable to 
the Committee, but only represents a part of the work 
which thev are doing. The Society appropriates a certain 



14 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

amount for this work, but the voluntary work that is done 
goes far beyond this appropriation, and the Chairman of 
the Committee is a much hirger contributor to the work 
than the amount received from the Society. The advan- 
tage of this work will be appreciated still more as the 
years go on. 

On January 7, 1901, in the evening the ladies inaugu- 
rated their series of Monday afternoon teas for the season 
of 1901, by a social evening, which was largely attended 
bv the members. The Monday afternoon teas which were 
commenced bv the ladies three years ago, in January, 1898, 
have been beneficial in promoting social life, and creating 
interest in the Societv. They continue during the months 
of January, February and March. 

This year the Council changed the name of the Com- 
mittee on Room to that of Custodians. The members of 
this Commitee, the Custodians, Messrs. William S. Burrill, 
George S. Bliss, Henry N. Comev, Earl A. Mower and 
Charles F. Peirce, have spent exening after evening in 
marking, arranging, and taking note of the articles which 
have been contributed. The arrangement and care of the 
room speaks for their good work, which needs only to be 
known to be appreciated. Mr. William S. Burrill, the 
Chairman, has an office in the building, and gives time 
and service to the Society which could only otherwise be 
obtained from a paid official, and but for whose voluntary 
care and service it would be almost imperative to employ 
some one for some portion of the time. 

The Committees which are most ret^ular in their time 
of meeting, are the Committees on Genealogy and Elderlv 
Citizens, and the work which these Committees have accom- 
plished goes to show what can be obtained by regular and 
earnest work. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. I5 

During the 3'ear the following gifts have been re- 
ceived : 

From Charlotte M. Robinson, books and papers from the estate of 
the late John L. Robinson. 

From Hon. Charles Dean, Mayor of Maiden, volume containing 
account of the 250th anniversary of the settlement of Maiden. 

From Marcella Downing, copies of papers. The Old Rat, The 
Kite Ender, The C)rgan, The Independent Journal, Directions 
of Christopher Robinson to Workmen, Cold Water Pledge. 

From Ipswich Historical Society, publication. 

From Harriet M. Kent, bunch of nails from ruins of Lynn confla- 
gration of Nov. 26, 1889. 

From Sarah J. Lothrop, North Weare, N.H., Farmer's Almanacs, 
Newport Mercury, 1781, old writing book, and old day-book. 

From Mary A. Noyes, two copies of old Lynn views in frames. 

From Cynthia Pratt Estes, book containing list of persons and date 
of burial in the Friends' Burying Ground, from 1809 to 1823, 
made by Cynthia Pratt ; copy of the Constitution of the 
Female Watchers' Society of the Fourth School District; 
Lynn Mirror of 1825 ; bill of John Pratt, 18 12. 

From George T. Chase, a Boston watchman's rattle. 

From Philip A. Chase, bound volume of the Salem Gazette. 

From George S. Bliss, photograph of the old ironworks location. 

From Mrs. William Parker Jones of Boston, bound volume of the 
genealogy of the Mudge family. 

From Pamelia B. Mudge, volume of the Commemorative Poems 
of David N. Johnson. 

From William Stone, two copies of the Liberator. 

From Susan T. Hill, two pieces of mahogany from the Old South 
Church, Boston ; weight and key from ruins of the Lynn hre ; 
flag-seated chair owned and used in the Ingalls family. 

From Medford Historical Society, publications. 

From Howard Mudge Newhall, pamphlets. 

From Richard I. Attwill, twenty-nine packages of papers ; gram- 
mar of 1806 ; map. 



l6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Charlotte M. Robinson, city documents : shoe and leather 

trade documents. 
From family of John T. Moulton, School Reports from 1844 to 1890 ; 

account of the 25th anniversary of Boston Street M.E. Church. 
From Bostonian Society, publication. 
From Moses Sweetser, book of Orestes Cleveland ; photograph ; 

planisphere. 
From Frederick E. Baker, old unrecorded Lynnfield deed. 
From Frank Richards, candle used for illumination in Newbury- 

port in campaigns of Presidents William H. Harrison and 

Benjamin Harrison. 
From Sarah Bacheller, from estate of Franklin Bacheller, old Lynn 

papers ; two small atlases ; writing of Henry Hallowell ; city 

charter circular. 
From estate of Katharine L. Johnson, lamp shade ; straw cutter 

for making bonnets. 
From Francis H. Fisher, pamphlet containing sermon of Rev. Mr. 

Thacher in First Congregational Church, on the occasion of 

burial of sailors shipwrecked on brig " Peggy.'' 
From Warren M. Breed, plate issued by Central National Bank 

on their 50th anniversary. 
From Pamelia B. Mudge, American Magazine, 1837 ; Night 

Thoughts, 1826; Poems, 1826; English Reader, 1824. 
From William E. Solomons, copy of Lynn News. 
From Maria A. Attwill, black satin lace boots, made in 1850. 
From Martha B. Shaw, American School Reader. 
From Helen H. Hovey, the Elements of English Grammar, 1796. 
From Mrs. E. F. Pepperell, large silk flag and pole of old Empire 

Fire Engine Company. 
From Adeline B. Beal, old Lynn directories : Boston Directory ; 

volumes, the Pretty Alphabet, Pirate's Glen and Dungeon 

Rock, U. S. School Primer. 
From Martha J. Cash, Sander's Spelling Book, 1839; Rudiments 

of Philosophy and Astronomy ; Analytical Reader. 
From Mrs. Amos H. Burrill, official letter of George Washington ; 

Life of George Washington. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. I7 

From Charles H. Hastings, six copies of souvenir Item contain- 
ing account of 50th anniversary celebration. 
From Mrs. Hiram O. Merrill, fifty-cent order payable at old Lynn 

Hotel. 
From Emma R. Searles, bills of the old Lynn Rifle Corps. 
From Annie Pepperell Newhall, an 1820 singing book. 
From Peabody Historical Society, publication. 
From Flora H. Breed, framed portrait of Rev. Parsons Cooke. 
From Charles A. Cross, photograph of members of the Society at 

Dungeon Rock. 
From Nantucket Historical Society, publication. 
From Henry F. Tapley, bound volume of Tapley Genealogy. 
From Nahant Public Library, publication descriptive of Nahant. 
From Charles Harwood, arrow heads and Lidian relics found in 

Lynn. 
From Mrs. H. E. Rowell, copies of Lynn Dew Drop, Messenger, 

Forum, Grindstone, Awl, Everett Monthly, Whig and Boston 

papers ; almanac ; candle snuffers. 
From Charles H. Newhall, by-laws and list of members of old 

Lynn Fire Club. 
From Alfred Cross, framed photograph of gates of King's Lynn, 

England. 
From George S. Manson, old pincers. 
From Nathan M. Hawkes, pamphlets. 
From Charles F. Peirce, picture of old Nahant Hotel. 
From George T. Estes, old pocket book used by Henry Oliver in 

1807. 

The work of a Historical Society is unlimited. One 
thing suggests another. A discovery in genealogy opens 
up some new line. The work broadens with growth. The 
beginning which this Society has made is but the begin- 
ning, but it has made a place for itself, and begun a career 
of usefulness which will broaden and enlarge with the 
future. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



EUGENE A. PUTNAM, Treasurer, 
in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dk. 
1900 Jan. 10 Cash rec'd from C. F. Peirce, Treasurer, $251 91 
ic,oi Jan. 9 Cash from members to date 846 00 



-$1,097 91 



Cr. 

1901 Jan. 9. Paid as per itemized account to date . . $802 85 

19C1 Jan. 30. Dep. in Lynn Institution for Savings . . 100 00 

Jan. 5. Balance Central National Bank .... 153 34 

Jan. 9. Cash on hand 4'7- 



-$1,097 91 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



Lynn, January g. igoi. 

The undersigned having been appointed to audit the ac- 
counts of Eugene A. Putnam, Treasiu'er, hereby report that 
they have examined the accounts and vouchers as presented to 
them, and they appear to be correct. 

Charles F. Peirce, 
Israel Augustus Newhall, 

A uditors. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



/ give and bequeath to the Lynn Historical Society the sum of 
Dollars. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. I9 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO PROCURE INFORMATION 
FROM ELDERLY CITIZENS. 



To THE Members of the Lynn Historical Society : 
Your Committee appointed to obtain information from 
elderly citizens beg leave to submit the following report : 

Monthly meetings have been held with the exception 
of July and August. Nearly one hundred blank books 
have been provided the Committee, to be distributed by 
them to elderly citizens in different parts of the city, or to 
some member of their families, with instructions to record 
any event of interest worth preserving that has taken place 
within their knowledge. This work is necessarily slow, 
but the different members of the Committee are diligent in 
watching those who hold the books. None of the books 
have as yet been returned, and your Committee will there- 
fore submit this as a report of progress. 

William Stone, 

LvxN, Jan. S, /go/. ■ Secretary. 



REPORT OF GENEALOGICAL COMMITTEE. 



The Committee on Genealogy would renew the invi- 
tation to members of the Society to till out their family 
blanks. Of the large membership only a small number 
have met the request, and we have in possession but eighty- 
seven manuscript genealogies where we ought to have sev- 
eral hundred. The labor of filling out these records is not 
so severe as many suppose, but w^here members desire 
assistance the Committee will cheerfullv render it. 



20 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The Committee has received a valuable suggestion to 
the effect that members furnish the names of books in their 
possession containing genealogies not in the public library, 
and which the owners would be willing to loan for refer- 
ence or consultation. We have one such list, furnished 
by Mr. George S. Bliss, and hope that others may follow 
his example. These lists will be posted in the rooms, and 
the owners can be applied to for the privilege to examine 
their treasures. 

It is the purpose of the Committee to bind the manu- 
script genealogies into a book, and material for the first 
volume is now ready, and will be bound the coming 3'ear. 
We believe that this method of collecting and preserving 
family records will be found in the future to be of great 
value. An admirable card catalogue to all our genealo- 
gies is now available. 

We have received printed ancestries from the follow- 
ing donors : — 

George S. Bliss, " American and English Town- 
sends ; " Mrs. John L. Parker, "Ancestors of Heniy L. 
Andrews;" Howard M. Newhall, "Record of the Hart 
family;" Henry F. Tapley, "The Tapley famil}^ ; " 
Dr. Charles E. Clark, "The Little family;"' John J. 
Putnam, "The Converse famil}-." 

The Committee has held stated meetings throuoh- 
out the year, and made general and personal efforts to add 
to our store of genealogies. To those who have responded 
to the appeals, grateful acknowledgment is made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John L. Parker, 

Chairman. 
Lynn, Jamtaiy 9, igoi. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 21 



REPORT OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC COMMITTEE OF THE 
LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



The principal efforts of the Committee during the past 
year have been directed toward laying the foundation for a 
collection of prints of Historic Lynn Views. 

The Gilson Album, with ii-inch by 13-inch leaves, 
was chosen as best adapted to the purpose. The size 
admits of the use of photographs up to 8 inches by lo 
inches, and, being adjustable, allows the removal of prints 
for exhibition, and what is even more desirable, a re- 
arrangement, as the number of photographs increases. 
We are thus able to keep prints relating to the same sub- 
ject together, and not scattered throughout several books,, 
as occurs in some collections. 

The platinotype, for its permanency, was selected as 
the standard process of printing. The work of mounting 
the prints has been started, and it is expected that the 
results will be submitted at the next meeting of the Society. 

Eighty-six (86) slides, and thirty-four (34) photo- 
graphs have been added to our collection. 

The total expense for the year has been $63.51, which 
includes $10.40 for slides illustrating Mr. E. F. Dwyer's 
lecture on geology. 

We take great pleasure in being able to report the 
promise of a valuable collection of old negatives of promi- 
nent Lynn people by Mr. W. T. Bowers, the veteran 
Market Street photographer. These portraits, taken from 
25 to 50 years ago, will prove of the greatest interest. 
Mr. Bowers has shown considerable interest in this work, 
and it is through him that we have been able to secure 
many of our most interesting pictures. 

George S. Bliss, Chairman. 



2 2 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY. 



Heretofore, no formal report other than the presenta- 
tion of brief necrologies has been made. 

An historical society is normally constituted of people of 
mature years. With the young, other things than genealogy, 
local history, or antiquarian lore attract the aitention. 

Too often in youth we neglect to record the reminis- 
cences of the past, which fall from the lips of the elders. 

We have not in the past, nor do we in the future, 
intend to attempt any eulogies of our deceased members. 
We simply put upon record as mucli of the genealogical 
line as can be furnished. We relate something of the 
activities of the life touched upon, and hint at the salient 
traits of the member, such points as in the future will 
readily bring the person vividly before the mental vision. 

These sketches, if properly written, will in the future 
be of value to the local historian, and to those of our stu- 
dents who may delve in the domain of the past. 

This plan would be easy enough to carry out if the 
Committee was a permanent one, but we are as subject to 
change as other human beings. 

One of our members, himself, peculiarly adapted to 
this kind of work, has died during the year. 

The increasing membership of the Society is a sure 
index of the solemn warning that the labors of this Com- 
mittee will hereafter press even more heavily than in the 
present year, when we have had to speak of twelve of our 
late active and respected associates. 

As the years roll by we shall more and more be 
obliged to rely upon the assistance of those who have been 



I.VXN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 23 

intimately associated with our departed friends : and, with 
this end in view, we have given these brief hints as to the 
character and the Hmited scope of our endeavors. 

Nathan M. Hawkes, 

Chairman. 



NECROLOGIES. 

CATHERINE LLOYD JOHNSON 

Was born in Lynn, in a house which formerly stood on the 
southerly side of Breed's Square, now removed to Western 
Avenue, near Lynn and Boston Car Stables. The house 
stood eaves towards the street, one and one-half stories, 
witli high basement. Grassy banks covered the stone 
work. Stairs led from the front door, near the middle of 
the house, to the path leading to the street. Two windows 
on each side of the doorway gave good light to the cozy 
rooms. One large chimney served all the rooms of the 
main house, the kitchen being in an ell in the rear. From 
this ell one could overlook a large garden that contained 
choice vines, shrubs and trees, which bore delicious fruit 
in their season, the pride of her father, Daniel Johnson. 
She was born March 17, 1832, and died February 2, 1900. 
Her father and mother w^ere " Qiiakers." 

The Johnson line of descent was : Richard\ Samuel", 
David^, Nehemiah\ SamueP, Daniel®, Catherine Lloyd 
Johnson^. 

Her mother was Comfort Allen, daughter of Moses 
Allen of Richmond, New Hampshire. She was a woman 
of great energy, a nervous temperament, never idle, kind 
heart and very decisive ; an instance : If a timid boy was 
afraid to pull a loose tooth, she woidd say, " Let me see 



24 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

it," and taking a towel in tier hand would ask the bo}' to 
open his mouth, when seizing the tooth she would have it 
out in a twinkling, then give him a ginger cookie for his 
bravery. Buffum Allen, brother to Comfort and uncle to 
Catherine, was an earnest advocate of the " Thompsonian 
Medical Cure." He died while taking the sweating treat- 
ment, at the " Thompsonian Infirmary," on Centre Street, 
Doctor Patten, Manager. 

The wife of Buffum Allen taught scholars of different 
ages, and little ones, too young to learn their letters, 
would go there and receive good care, while their hard- 
working mothers attended to other duties. Perhaps this 
was the first " Kindergarten " in Lynn, 1833 ^o 1840. 

Catherine went to this school for her early training, 
then later to Master Perle}^ Balch and Joseph Peabody, 
linishing her studies at the " Friends' School," Providence, 
Rhode Island. She taught school at Blackstone, Mass., 
for a short time, and many years later taught a short time 
at a boys' school in Billerica, Mass. 

While keeping house for her father in Lynn, she took 
as a boarder, Mr. Roach, a graduate from Perkins Institu- 
tion for the Blind. He taught pupils to play the piano and 
had man}^ in Lynn and vicinity. She acted as reader of 
music to Mr. Roach ; he would memorize each note and 
mark of inflection, dotted notes, sharps, flats, &c., and 
then play the piece on the piano, afterwards teaching it 
to his pupils ; he was a ver}^ successful teacher, and always 
went about without a leader. 

Moses Allen Johnson was brother to Catherine ; he got 
a position in a mill in Lowell, and while there invented, or 
helped to perfect, a process of felting that made felt goods 
of practical value. To-day, felt hats, blankets and other 
articles are an every-day convenience. 




.y 



CHARLES BARKER TEBBETTS. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 25 

Catherine and her father lived with Moses until Moses 
and her father died, then she returned to L3'nn for her 
future home. She was very fond of young children, and 
many are now living who mourn for Aunt Kate, as thev 
were wont to name her. She was a member of the 
Woman's Club and Lynn Historical Society, and always 
interested and read}^ to help along all social forward move- 
ments for the uplift of humanity. 

It was a custom of this branch of the Johnsons, 
brothers and sisters, uncles, aunts and cousins, to assemble 
each year for a " Fish Fry" at Nahant. Sometimes Bass 
Point was selected, sometimes North Spring, or as after- 
ward named Maolis Garden. At these gatherings none were 
more happy and entertaining than Catherine and her father 
Daniel. Daniel always made the chowder, and his anxiety 
was shown in frequent questions, as: " Rebecca, has thee 
peppered and salted this chowder enough?" or, •' Lydia, 
can thee spare me more milk, I think this is not quite rich 
enough?" Each member would trv to catch a nipper, as 
the fish was called, for the chowder, from little tot to 
bearded elder. So all had a share in fun and feast. Those 
experiences are now past history. 



CHARLES BARKER TEBBETTS 

Was born at Rochester, New Hampshire, January 26, 1843, 
the fourth son of Judge Noah Tebbetts of the Court of 
Common Pleas of New Hampshire, and of his wife Mary 
Esther (Woodman) Tebbetts. On both his paternal and 
maternal sides he was in the eighth generation from emi- 
grants who arrived in this country in 1635. We have a 
record of a grant of land in Dover, New Hampshire, to 
Henry Tebbetts, the first emigrant, dated 1643. The ne.xt 



26 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

two generations, Jeremiah and Henry, remained in Dover. 
Edward, the fourth in descent, horn 1737, died 1795? 
moved to Rochester, New Hampshire, and there Charles' 
grandfather James, and his father Noah, were settled when 
he was born. On his mother's side, Mr. Tebbetts was 
descended from Edward Woodman, who came to Newbur}^ 
Mass., June 3, 1635. He was one of fifteen out of the 
ninety-one grantees of Newbury who bore the title of Mr. 
He was a deputy to the General Court, 1636, '37, '39 and 
'43. Four generations of Woodmans remained at New- 
burv, but the Reverend Joseph, 1 748-1807, removed to 
Sanbornton, New Hampshire, and his son, Jeremiah Hall, 
came to Rochester where Mar}' Esther, 1808-1879, Charles' 
mother, was born at what was once the Woodman Man- 
sion, but is now a hotel. 

Noah Tebbetts, Charles' father, was educated at 
Dartmouth, as long as Dartmouth was a university, and 
upon the re-construction of the college he removed to 
Bowdoin, from which he graduated in the class of 1822. 
He was admitted to the bar soon after, practised law, 
entered the New Hampshire Legislature in 1842, and in 
January, 1843, was appointed Circuit Justice of the Com- 
mon Pleas. After presiding over an arduous criminal case 
in the summer of 1844, he was taken ill and died in his 
forty-second year, leaving a widow and five young children. 

Charles, the third surviving son, was educated at 
public schools of Rochester, N.H., and at the High School 
at Medtord, where his eldest brother, Theodore, was pastor 
of the first Parish Church. Leaving school in i860, he 
entered the employ of Moses Howe, of Haverhill, coming 
to Lynn soon after to work with Lucian Newhall. The 
death of his eldest brother, Theodore, in 1863, and the 
fact that his two other brothers were in the army, exempted 




VAl'ID HERBERT SIVHETSER. 



I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 27 

him from military service during the war. In 1864, he 
started to manufacture shoes in a small wooden building 
on Union Street, on the ground now occupied by the 
Tucker Building. In 1866, he entered into partnership 
with Lucian Newhall, and on Mr. Xewhall's retirement in 
1871, Mr. Tebbetts continued the business alone. In 1880, 
he built the factory now standing on the corner of Oxford 
and Willow Streets, where he remained in business until his 
retirement in 1895. As an illustration of the development of 
the manufacture of shoes in Lynn, Mr. Tebbetts' output in 
1864 was five cases a day, and in the Willow Street factory 
it reached one hundred and twenty-five cases a day. 

Mr. Tebbetts was interested in all that concerned the 
welfare of Lynn. He was a member of the Board of 
Managers of the Lynn Hospital, President of the Board 
of Trustees of the Unitarian Church, a contributor and 
well-wisher to the Lynn Public Library, and a member of 
the Lynn Historical Society, He was a willing giver to 
many charities. He was a Vice-President of the Massa- 
chusetts Republican Club, a member of the Oxford Club, 
the Essex Club, a sometime member of the x\lgonquin 
Club, and a member of the Unitarian Club. He was a 
Director of the Central National Bank of Lvnn, and of 
the Lynn Institution for Savings. He was fond of travel- 
ing and had spent several winters in Egypt. While at 
Cairo he died very suddenl}", February 27, 1900, mourned 
by his family and by a large number of friends. 



DAVID HERBERT SWEETSER 

Was born December i, 1833. His father was David S. 
Sweetser, a descendant of Seth Sweetser, who came to 
Charlestown in 1635. ^is mother was Peace Buffum 



28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

(Alley) Sweetser, a descendant of Hugh Alley, who settled 
in Lynn in 1635. 

The brick house at the head of Market Street, at the 
junction of Broad Street, is the birthplace of D. H. 
Sweetser, The house was built by John Alley, and at first 
was occupied in part by the Sweetser family, but later 
became a public house under the successive names of 
Mansion House and Rail Road House. 

The Sweetsers' next house was a cottage on Summer 
Street, wdiere the family must have felt at home, because 
of the fact that the estate had been owned by the Alleys 
for two hundred years. Tiie land bounded by Market, 
Summer and Shepard Streets, w^as mostly owned by de- 
scendants of Hugh Alley. 

The boy was a pupil of Master John Batchelder at 
the Ward 5 Grammar School. We infer that he was a 
good scholar, as he was admitted to the High School the 
year of its organization after passing an examination that 
to-day would be called difficult. 

The time at this school was cut short b}" an offer of a 
situation in John B, Alley's leather store in Boston. In the 
commercial panic of 1857, and in the depressed state 
of business in the early years of the Civil War he received 
his business training. The responsibilities of the manage- 
ment of affairs impressed him, and made him prudent and 
cautious and qualified him for the offices of trust that he 
so faithfully filled for nearly thirty years. His seven years' 
service to Mr. Alley was an apprenticeship for a subse- 
quent partnership in the firm, from which he finally with- 
drew to organize the successful shoe-finding business under 
the name of Sweetser, Skilton & Dole. With the dissolu- 
tion of this firm Mr. Sweetser retired from active mercan- 
tile life, but kept in touch with affairs as the President of a 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 29 

Company created by Lynn men, called the Exchange 
Insurance Company. 

The great Boston fire of 1872 marks the next epoch 
in his life, for in the great destruction it wrought, the 
Exchange Insurance Company was swept away with the 
rest, and the President, finding himself freed from all busi- 
ness duties, spent the spring and summer in a trip through 
Europe in company with S. M. Bubier, and other friends. 
On his return, his natural relation to business interests 
were re-established by becoming President of the Lynn 
Institution for Savings. As President and as Treasurer 
twenty-six 3'ears, he continued to direct the policy of the 
Institution, and to take a lively interest in public affairs 
until the day of his death. 

The public and semi-public offices that he filled during 
his busy life were many. The following list embraces the 
most important : Member of the Common Council, con- 
temporary with B. F. Doak, Joseph Davis and A. F. 
Breed ; a member of the Water Board, and its Chairman 
for several years; Chairman of the Board of License 
Commissioners ; President of the Lynn Board of Trade ; 
Member of the State Board of Trade ; Director succes- 
sively of the Central National Bank, the Lynn National 
Bank, the First National Bank ; The Security Safe De- 
posit and Trust Co. ; Director and Treasurer of the Lynn 
Hospital ; Director of the Home for Aged Women ; Presi- 
dent of the Park and of the Oxford Clubs, and Trustee 
of the Unitarian Society. His services as an administrator 
and fiduciary trustee were frequently sought. 

Mr. Svveetser was married at the age of twentv-five bv 
the Rev. Parsons Cooke to Marv Abbv Chase, daughter of 
Philip Chase. They lived for many years on the Chase 
estate on North Common Street, where the Public Library 



30 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

now stands. About the time the property passed to the 
City, the family moved to Baltimore Street on land owned, 
since the settlement of Lynn, b}^ William Bassett and his 
descendants. 

To benefit his health, Mr. Sweetser visited Italy last 
winter and returning, reached New York April 7, 1900. 
On the way to the railroad station from the steamship, he 
died suddenly of a heart complaint that his physicians had 
regarded as serious for several months. 

In person, Mr. Sweetser was a little below the aver- 
age height. A florid complexion and animated manner 
made him appear younger than his years. The clear crisp 
language in which he expressed himself was an indication 
of a mind clear and keenly perceptive, which, united with 
a broad public spirit, made him an excellent citizen and 
helpful member of society. 

Honesty, industry, and fidelity to trust were the strong 
points in his character. In doing for others, he show^ed 
the same zeal and devotion as in doing for himself. A life 
as well spent as was his is w^orth}" a record on these pages 
of our history. 



EBENEZER KNOWLTON FOGG, 

The subject of this sketch, was born in Northwood, N. H., 
October 24, 1837, coming from good old Revolutionary 
ancestors, his grandfather having taken part in that 
struggle. He spent his early years in the schools of his 
native town, and the New Hampton Academy. 

When twenty years of age, he came to Lynn and 
engaged in shoemaking. Later, he engaged in the retail 
shoe business on Union Street with his brother-in-law. 



L 



,#1^ 



/ 




EBENEZER KNOIVLTON FOGG. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 3 1 

G. H. Batchelder, after which for two years he served as 
salesman for the well-known lirm of Titus & Buckley. 

He was a life-long Republican, and was extremely 
active in the counsels and work of the party. A man of 
sound judgment, a kind, warm heart, great executive force, 
and the most unblemished character, he became prominent 
in Republican circles, and was honored by several offices 
by his constituents. 

In 1888 Mr. FoiTff w^as elected to the Common Coun- 
cil, and in 1889 and 1890, he was in the Board of Alder- 
men, serving as President of the Board in the latter year. 
During 1891 he served the City as its Mayor; his term, 
was characterized by the same honesty and application to 
the best interests of the City as had been all other positions 
to which he had been called. He was elected to the Legis- 
lature of 1896 and 1897, serving on the Committee on 
Metropolitan Affairs. 

His term as Postmaster at Lvnn began June i, 1898 ; 
he held the office until his death, nearly two years later. 
During his term of office the postal service in the city 
was greatly improved. Swampscott was added to the 
Lynn Postal District, and free delivery established in that 
town. Three sub-stations in Lynn were added to give the 
people better facilities for the transaction of their postal 
business. 

Mr. Fogg was a model husband and father. He was 
married January 5, 1862, to Miss Fannie S. Batchelder of 
Northwood, N. H., two children resulting from the union, 
Wilbert Kirkland, wiio died in 1898, and Bertha Grace, 
who with the widow, survives him. He died April 21, 
1900. 

Of social disposition, Mr. Fogg had long been promi- 
nent amonor the fraternal associations of the Citv. He 



32 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

was a member of Golden Fleece Lodge of Free Masons, 
and was a charter member of East Lynn Lodge of Odd 
Fellows. He was an attendant at the First Universalist 
Church, Nahant Street. 



ANNA AMELIA HOOD 
Was born on February 27, 1832, in that portion of Lynn, 
now Nahant, in the second house built on the peninsula, 
occupied bv her great-grandfather, Richard Hood, whose 
ancestors are traced to colonial days. The first Richard 
came from Lynn, England. 

Richard"^ held the office of Collector of Taxes. 
Richard'- bought large tracts of land, and the '* Hood 
homestead " from Lady Humphrey, when she left the col- 
ony for England. At his death, he left a large property 
in land, houses, and household effects. 

Richard" moved to Nahant : Abner^, his son, had a 
son Benjamin*, who married Hannah Phillips of Svvamp- 
scott. These were the father and mother of Amelia^. 
The Phillips family came from Pictou Castle, Wales, 
which estate remains to the present time in the Phillips 
family. Sir John Phillips being its present owner. The 
house in Swampscott, which passed out of the family 
many years ago, still stands, and is called " The Elms.'' 
Both the Hoods and Phillips's were members of the 
Society of Friends, called Qiiakers. 

Amelia Hood was educated at the Lynn and Town- 
send Academies. From her father, Benjamin Hood, she 
inherited a keen sense of humor and readv wit, quick in 
repartee, which made her always a welcome guest ; from 
her mother, great decision of character, which, early left an 




A.y.y.A A ME/. I A HOOD. 




AArOS FR\\K/J.\ Bk-F.ED. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 33 

orphan, enabled her to assume the business cares of the fam- 
ily, conducting affairs with an unusual amount of energy 
and ability. She was a woman of great appreciation of the 
graces of life. Cultivated travel had broadened a mind 
receptive to all the refining influences. She loved music, 
art and literature. Few women are equally loved and 
honored by a wider circle of friends and acquaintances. 
In friendship she was loyal, faithful and constant; her 
presence stood for usefulness, integrity, dignity, good 
cheer. Her charm of manner, simple directness of thought, 
keen sense of humor, combined with a calm, cheerful, and 
courageous nature, and ready sympathy, made her one of 
those loval hearts who in life's battle firm doth stand, 

" Shall bear hope's tender blossoms 
Into the silent land."" 

She died April 27, 1900. 



AMOS FRANKLIN BREED. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Lynn, Octo- 
ber 15, 1830, and died May 22, 1900, spending his ^vhole 
life in the town and cit}-. His parents were Amos and 
Francis (Reed) Breed. He was a descendant of one of the 
earliest settlers of Lvnn, Allen Breed, a farmer, who 
was born in 1601, and came to Lynn in 1630, and lived 
near where Summer Street crosses Western Avenue, and 
from him the vicinity where he resided was called Breed's 
End. 

Soon after passing through the public schools, Mr. 
Breed engaged in the shoe business, making a success, as 
he did in all his enterprises. For his courtesy, strict integ- 
rity and thorough business management, he was sought by 
3 



34 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

moneyed institutions, and in 1884, became President of 
the First National Bank, which position he held until his 
decease. He was also a Director and Vice President of 
the Lynn Institution for Savings, Vice President of the 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad Co., and a Direc- 
tor of the Lynn Gas and Electric Co. 

His business ability in the management of the Lynn 
and Boston Railroad Co., however, gave him his widest 
fame. He assumed this management when the stock w^as 
considered almost worthless, and by dint of the far-seeing 
policy which he inaugurated, made it among the best in the 
Commonwealth. Extending its tracks in all directions, 
improving the rolling stock, and absorbing the Belt Line 
Road, the notice of investors was attracted, and the North 
Shore Traction Co. was formed, absorbing the Lynn and 
Boston and subsidiary branches. Mr. Breed was made 
President of the increased corporation, and renewed his 
former successes. On July 30, 1899, the system of the 
North Shore Traction Co. was bought by a company of 
Boston capitalists, and several other roads were combined 
with it under the name of the Massachusetts Electric Rail- 
ways Co., and of this Mr. Breed was made President, a 
worthy compliment to his policy and management. It has 
been truly said that " Lynn owes more to Mr. Breed than 
to any other man for the great development of its suburbs." 

He was a true citizen, and took an active interest in 
politics from his arrival at his majority. He was a life- 
long Republican, and in 1864 ^^^s elected to the Common 
Council, and was a member of the Board of Aldermen in 
1865, 1866, 1867, 1868 and 1870. In 1865 and 1866, and 
also in 1876 he was elected to the Legislature, and in 1877 
and 1878, he was a member of the Senate, serving the lat- 
ter year as Chairman of the Committee on Street Railways. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 35 

In 1896 he was elected a delegate to the national Republi- 
can convention. 

His public spirit and general worthiness have been 
recognized by the citizens, and he has been called upon tO' 
give his services as Chairman of the Pine Grove Cemetery 
Commissioners nearly twenty years, and Commissioner of 
the city sinking funds. He was a generous giver to all 
forms of charit}', and was always open to appeals for 
local enterprises. 

Mr. Breed married Mary A. Lindsey, of Lynn, who, 
with two sons, x\mos F. and Sylvester B. Breed, survive 
him. 



SAMUEL HENDERSON GREEN, 

Son of Samuel and Hannah (Boden) Green, was born in 
Lynn, October 24, 1850, and spent his whole life in this 
city. He was educated in our public schools. Then he 
engaged in the shoe finding business, in which he con- 
tinued until his death. 

He married Mary A., daughter of Ezra and Rosanna 
Wardwell of Lynn. She, with two children, Doctor 
Arthur W., who is a hospital steward in the Forty-sixth 
Regiment, U. S.V"., now stationed in the Philippine Islands, 
and a daughter, Jennie B., survive him. 

Born in 1850, the year Lynn was made a city, he was 
invited to be an aid in the procession of May 15th, the day 
of the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the incor- 
poration of Lynn as a city. He was injured while mount- 
ing a horse in that procession. His death, on July 20, 
1900, was the result of the accident. 

He was a member of Bay State Lodge and Palestine 
Encampment, I. O. O. F., the Oxford Club, and of the 



^6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Lynn Historical Society. He was an attendant at the First 
Universalist Church. 

Mr. Green was a genial, social man, honest and up- 
right in every respect. He made friends wherever he 
went. He was a very domestic man. Fond of his home, 
he surrounded it with ever3-thing to make it pleasant and 
attractive. A devoted husband and father, a useful mem- 
ber of society, his memor}- will be cherished by all who 
knew him. 



JOHN ELBRIDGE HUDSON 

Was born in Lynn, August 3, 1839, '^^^'-^ died at his 
summer home in Beverl}^, October i, 1900. He was the 
son of John and Elizabeth C. (Hilliard) Hudson, and a 
lineal descendant of Thomas Hudson (of the family of 
Henry Hudson, the navigator), one of the planters of 
Lynn. He married August 23, 187 1, Eunice W. Heale}', 
daughter of Wells and Elizabeth (Pickering) Healey of 
Hampton Falls, N. H. They had no issue. She survives 
him. 

Mr. Hudson's maternal great-grandfather was Rev. 
Samuel Hilliard, a pioneer in Universalism, and a soldier 
of the Revolution, who served at Bunker Hill and Ben- 
nington. His mother's maternal grandparents were Rev. 
Dr. David Hall, who preached in the Congregational 
Church at Sutton for sixty years, and Elizabeth (Prescott) 
Hall, daughter of Dr. John, and Rebecca (Bulkley) Pres- 
cott of Concord. 

Mr. Hudson's early training was in the Lynn public 
schools. He fitted himself for Harvard" College, and was 
graduated in 1862, the valedictorian of his class, sumvia 
cum laude. He was the best Greek scholar of his class, 




JOHN ELBRIDGE HUDSON. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 37 

and while still an nnder-graduate was appointed to a Greek 
tutorship, an appointment unique in the history of the 
college. Tutoring was simply an avocation while he was 
preparing for his life work, which was to be law. He 
was graduated from Harvard Law School, in 1865, and 
was admitted to the Suffolk Bar, October 25, 1866, when 
he entered the office of Chandler, Shattuck & Thayer. 

In 1870, he became a partner in the firm of Chandler, 
Thayer & Hudson, and later, Chandler, Ware & Hudson. 
In 1878, the firm was dissolved, and for two years rvlr. 
Hudson continued alone. 

In 1880, Mr. Hudson became general counsel for the 
American Bell Telephone Company, and devoted himself 
exclusively to its interests. In 1885, he became general 
manager of the Company; in 1887, Vice-President; and 
in 1889, President, which office he held at the time of his 
death. In 1887, he became President of the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company — "The Long Dis- 
tance Company " — with which, in 1900, the Bell Company 
was consolidated. Duringr his direction as General Man- 
ager and President, the number of miles of telephone wire 
increased from 101,592 in 1885, to 1,016,777 ^" 1899; and 
the number of exchange connections from 272,478,705 in 
1885, to 1,666,000,000 in 1899. 

Other elements enter into the estimate of a man's suc- 
cess or failure in life, but in this pushing age of ours it is 
perhaps not indelicate to sa}' that this great corporation 
which Mr. Hudson managed so brilliantly put a higher 
value upon his annual services than any other man born in 
Lynn ever received. 

Mr. Hudson was a member of the corporation of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was Vice- 
President of the New England Historic-Genealogical 



38 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Societ}', and a member of the following societies : Ameri- 
can Antiquarian Society, fellow of American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences, British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Bos- 
tonian Society, Bar Association of the Cit}- of Boston, 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Virginia His- 
torical Societ^v, and of the Lynn Historical Society. 

Mr. Hudson was a member of the Boston Art, St. Bo- 
tolph, Union, Algonquin, Exchange, and University Clubs. 

The ownership of some land on the banks of the 
Saugus River by the immigrant Thomas Hudson, and the 
discovery of bog iron ore, with the establishment there of 
the Iron Works, led to an incident in the life of John E. 
Hudson, whicli shows his keen interest in the ties of kin- 
ship, and attachment for his birthplace. 

The rude little iron kettle, which is now a priceless 
legacy of Lynn, is believed to have been the first casting 
made in America. It was made and given to Thomas 
Hudson, in consideration of release of claim to the land. 
It remained in possession of his descendants until it was 
presented to the City of Lynn, by John E. Hudson, Novem- 
ber 21, 1892. 

Most men who achieve fame win it upon a single line. 
Mr. Hudson attained high rank in several widely differing 
ways. He was a profound student of Greek, and of Gre- 
cian histor}', with which he kept in touch to the last of his 
persistently busy life. 

As a lawyer, he was noted for his thoroughness of 
preparation, for his keen analysis of intricate points, and 
for his conscientious devotion to important interests in- 
trusted to him. 

His ceaseless studies developed the keen business tal- 
ent, so that when he came to the Telephone Company all 




MARTHA LOUISR NE IV HALL. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



39 



his faculties were alert, and he became the master-mind 
of a great business. As scholar, as lawyer, and as busi- 
ness man, he was easily leader. 



MARTHA LOUISE NEWHALL 

Was born in Boston, Mass., April 28, 1852, and died in 
Lynn, Mass., October 17, 1900. She was the daughter of 
Newell and Phebe Nourse. Both of her parents were direct 
descendants of the early settlers of this country, her father 
being a descendant of the famous Rebecca Nourse, and 
her mother was a descendant of the Shaw family. She 
was a woman of constant cheerfulness, always loyal to her 
friends, and of a kind and benevolent disposition. She 
had a very large circle of friends. She was educated in 
the public schools of Cambridge, " Lasell Seminary" of 
Auburndale, and Wesleyan Academy of Wilbraham, 
Mass. She was a member of the Lynn Common M. E. 
Church, the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Glen Lewis Council 
of the Royal Arcanum, and of the Lynn Historical Societ}', 
in all of which she took a deep interest. She loved to be 
with, and was very devoted to her famil}^ 

She was married to George H. Newhall of Lynn in 
Cambridge, Mass., January 17, 1872, by Rev. Ira G. Bid- 
well of the Harvard Street M. E. Church ; since that time 
she has resided in Lynn. She had two daughters, Loella 
and Lizzie Grace, who, with her husband, survive her. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON FLANDERS 

Was born August 6, 1808, at South Hampton, N. H., and 
died November 8, 1900, in Lynn, where he had resided 



_j.O LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

for nearly seventy years. His parents were Parker Flan- 
ders and Tirzah Sawver, both of whom were also natives 
of South Hampton. 

Mr. Flanders received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town. He came to Lynn in 1829, 
and with the exception of a few years passed in Maine, 
has lived here ever since. His trade was that of a car- 
penter, and he worked for Ezekiel Parker, Benjamin 
Clifford and others, and later, in partnership with Joseph 
Oilman. He erected several large water wheels for mills 
in various parts of New England, and later, gave his atten- 
tion to the setting up of shoe machinery in Lynn. Mr. 
Flanders had great confidence in the growth of Lynn, 
buying and improving considerable real estate on what 
was formerly Beach Street. His frugal and industrious 
habits enabled him to retire from active work some years 
ago, but he did not cease to be active in his own affairs, 
and interested in local matters up to the time of his death. 
Mr. Flanders kept a diary from the year 1825 to the time 
of his death, a record of personal and local events, inter- 
esting and of great value. 

Mr. Stephen Flanders, probably the tirst and only one 
of the name, came to America together with his wife Jane, 
between 1640 and 1646, settling in Salisbury, Mass. He 
died June 27, 1684. His wife died November 19, 1683. 

George W. Flanders was a descendant from the above 
in the sixth generation. He was married to Ruth L. 
Flanders (no relation) February 16, 1842. She was born 
August 28, 1819, and died November 11, 1878, in Lynn. 

He leaves a son, Wendell Phillips Flanders of New 
York City, and one daughter, Lizzie, wife of Edward 
Oliver Chase of Newark, N.J. 




GEORGE H'ASHrXGTON FLAXD^RS. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



41 



EDWARD MAURY RUSSELL 

who died at die Lynn Hospital, on November 14, 1900^ 
from injuries received from the collision of his bic}'cle 
with a heavy team, was born in Dedham, Mass., on 
January 3, 1857. Little is known of his family ancestry, 
excepting that his father's family came from Connecticut,, 
and his mother's family from England. 

He moved from Dedham to Jamaica Plain when a ver}' 
voung boy, and moved to Lynn about 1870. In Lynn, he 
was for many years connected with the L. A. May Co., a 
large household furnishing store, afterwards was a col- 
lector for different business houses, and at the time of his 
death held a position in the L3'nn office of the General 
Electric Company. He was a member of the Oxford Club 
and of the Lynn Historical Society. He was much inter- 
ested in church and charitable work, and was always read}- 
to make himself useful when needed. He was one of the 
early members of St. Stephen's Episcopal vested boy 
choir, and for three years was President of the Choir 
Guild, an association of those who had been connected 
with the choir. As librarian of the Sunday-school, and in 
many other ways, he gave freely of his time to St. 
Stephen's Church. During the active existence of the Lynn 
Boys' Club he was greatly interested in its welfare, and 
was also active in assisting in the work of obtaining money 
for the Lvnn Hospital in the arrangements for Hospital 
Day. Genial, generous, wherever he was found he was 
conscientious, useful and faithful. A brother, William R. 
Russell of New York, is his remaining near relative. No 
recent photograph of Mr. Russell is in the possession of 
anv of his friends, and cannot be presented in connection 
with this sketch. 



42 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS HILL, 
Who died in Lynn, December i6, 1900, was a descendant 
in the seventh generation, from John Hill of England, who 
settled in Dorchester in the seventeenth century. His 
father was Deacon Philip Ellis Hill, and his mother Louisa 
Packard (Leach) Hill, both of whom were born in Bridge- 
water. His maternal ancestor was Giles Leach of Eng- 
land, who came to Bridgewater in 1656. The subject of 
this sketch was born in Bridgewater, Mass., September 26, 
1827. His father was a farmer, and he followed that 
honorable calling until he came to Lvnn, in 1865. Here 
he associated himself with a brother of his wife, Edward 
M. Farnsworth, in the shoe-finding business. Later, he 
was in company with the late L. B. Russell, under the 
name of Russell & Hill, then in business with Hill Broth- 
ers, and finally as head of the firm of Wm. F. Hill & Co. 
They were located on Exchange Street at the time of the 
great fire in Lynn, and suffered with others in the destruc- 
tion of their property. Relocating on Suffolk Street, he 
continued the business until his fatal illness, which, how- 
ever, was of comparatively short duration. 

William F. Hill belonged to the conservative class of 
business men, who are always' relied upon for their strict 
integrity, and honest dealing. What he said could be 
believed, and what he promised he alwa3's fulfilled. With 
no political aspirations, he was ever faithful to that duty 
of the citizen, which consists in expressing by his ballot 
his consent to the authority of those who were chosen to 
rule in public affairs. 

Deacon Hill had fine taste for music, and in the palmy 
days of the Lynn Choral Union he was one of the most 
enthusiastic members. 




WILLIAM FRA.XCIS HILL. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 43 

Socially, William F. Hill was a warm and faithful 
friend. His friends loved him because his love for them 
was never stinted, and it spoke not only from his lips, but 
from his eyes, and in the smile that never failed to light 
up his kindly countenance. 

His religious home was in the Baptist Church, and he 
was for the greater part of his life in fellowship with that 
communion. On coming to Lynn, he joined the High 
Street Baptist Church, but in 1874, ^^*^ with others with- 
drew and formed the East Baptist Church, becoming one 
of its deacons, in which office he continued until his death. 
No higher tribute can be paid to his integrity than the 
statement that for nearly t\vent3'-five years he was the 
honored Treasurer of the Church. 

On November 22, 1855, he was united in marriage 
with Susan Thayer Farnsworth, daughter of Rev. James 
D. Farnsworth of Bridgewater, Mass. Five children were 
the fruit of this union, three of whom, George B., Char- 
lotte F., and Mrs. Susan Francis Green, survive. 

Deacon Hill was a member of the Houghton Horti- 
cultural Society, the Essex Congregational Club, the 
Lynn Historical Society, and the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 



44 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



MEMBERS 



April 27, 1807. Abbott, Waldo Lovejoy 25 Hanover St. 

" Aborn, Charles Henry Swampscott 

Jtfarr// 2(3, 1901. Akhvortli, Eliza A 394 Walnut St. 

Jan. 28, 1S98. Allen, Lillie B 120 South Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Allen, Walter B 2 Walden St. 

July 29, 1901. Allen, Eliza M 2 AValden St. 

April 27, 1897. Attwill, Alfred :Mudge Kensington Square 

" Atwood, Luther 8 Sagamore St. 

Xov. 23, 1899. Babcock, Bessie B 48 Breed St. 

April 27, 1897. Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2743 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111. 

April 21, IS91. Baker, Frederick E 189 Lewis St. 

J/ayr/i 18, 1899. Baker, Harry Mudge 11.5 Ocean St. 

" liaker, Lynette Dawes 115 Ocean St. 

March 12, 1900. Barker, Balph E 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1897. Barney, Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

" Barney, William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

" Barry, John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Bartlett, Ella Doak 61 Atlantic St. 

Oct. IS, IS91. Bartlett, Hannah H llSNahantSt. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Bartlett, John S 61 Atlantic St. 

April 27, 1899. Bazzoni, Mary A 28 Elsmere Place 

Jane 1,1897. Beal, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

March 26, 1901. Beard, Cordelia M. E 389 Essex St. 

" Beard, Daniel Breed 389 Essex St. 

March 8, 1901. Bennett, George Edwin 44 Ireson Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Bennett, Josiah Chase 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

" Bennett, Larkin Everett 258 Gibson St., Lowell 

March 8, 1901. Bennett, Mary Eugenia Pearl 44 Ireson Ave. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Berry, Benjamin Hun 238 Ocean St: 

June 9, 1899. Berry, John W 105 Franklin St. 

" Berry, Susannah W 105 Franklin St. 

March 27, 1900. Bessom, William B 44 Elsmere Place 

Nov. 24, 1897. Bliss, George S 24 Chase St. 



L.ofC. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 45 

Oct. 28, 1898. Blood, Eldredge H I57 Maple St. 

March 8, 190L Brainerd, Albion 11 5;] Xahant St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Breed, Adelaide L 17 Xahant St. 

Dec. 28, 1899. Breed, Caroline A 61 Newhall St. 

Ifacc/i 26, 1901. Breed, Charles Orrin 54 Elm St. 

Oc<. 11, 1899. Breed, Clara E 40 Xahant Place 

June 1, 1897. Breed, Emma Hawthorne 114 Green St. 

April 20, 1900. Breed, Florence L 22 Breed St. 

Nov. 28, 1899. Breed, Frances Tucker 52 Baltimore St. 

Ocf. 11, 1899. Breed, Frank M 40 Xahant Blace 

Nov. 28, 1899. Breed, George Albert 52 Baltimore St. 

March 21, 1900. Breed, George Herschel 40 Xahant Place 

April 27, 1897. Breed. George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

" Breed, Henry W 48 Xahant St. 

" Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Xahant St. 

March2G, 1901. Breed, Lilla M 54 Elm St. 

March 8, 1901. Breed, Marietta 41 Franklin St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Breed, Mary E 47 Commercial St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Breed, S. Estelle 118 Green St. 

April 21, 1S91. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

" Breed, Stephen Lovejoy ]5 Xewhall St. 

" Breed, Warren Mudge 22 Breed St. 

March 18, 1899. Bresnahan, Maurice V 128 Chestnut St. 

Ajyril 27, 1897. Brigham, Frank F 17 Franklin St. 

" *Brown, Joseph Goold 83 Green St. 

" Brown, Mary Gerry 11 Light St. 

" Bubier, Frederick L 23 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Bubier, Harriott Mudge 185 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1897. Bubier, Joanna Attwill 172 Washington St. 

" Bubier, Mary Adelaide 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Mary A 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, X'^athan G Swampscott 

'' Bubier, Samuel Arthur 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Sylvester H., 2d 172 Washington St. 

" Buffum, Charles 450 Union St. 

March 18, 1899. Buker, Frank Emery 25 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1897. Bullinch, Charles F 184 Lewis St. 

" Burrill, Abby M 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, John Irving 23 Xahant Place 

" Burrill, William A 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, William Stocker 23 Xahant Place 

April 29, 1901. Burrows, Helen 1 196 Washington St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Burrows, Joseph E 196 Washington St. 



46 LVNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

3/a?v/; 26, 1901. Caldwell, .Sarah M. X 23 Caldwell Crescent 

April 27, 1897. Carleton, Joseph G. S 15 Ocean Terrace 

Feb. 9, 1899. Chace, Maria Rachel 185 Franklin St, 

April 27, 1897. Chadwell, George H 192 South Common St. 

Jan. 10, 1900. Chadwick, Ida F 7 Franklin St. 

" Chadwick, Sarah F 7 Franklin St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Chase, Alice P 47 Baltimore St. 

3farc/« 12, 1900. Chase, Ellen S 24 Chase St. 

" Chase, Frederick S 24 Chase St, 

April 27, 1897. Chase, Percy Brookline, Mass, 

" Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

" Clark, Charles Edward 89 Broad St. 

Clough, Charles Bartlett 39 Cherry St. 

" Clough, Harriet Kelley 253 Ocean St. 

" ■ Clough, Micajah Pratt 253 Ocean St. 

Jfarc/i 26, 1901. Cobb, Bessie Brown 4 Washington Square 

" Cobb, Carolus M. 4 Washington Square 

March 8, 1901. Colburn, Clifton 80 Xahant St. 

Oct. 11, 1899. Comey, Henry Newton . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

Oct. 26, 1900. Conner, Adalaide M 27 Sagamore St. 

7>ec. 28, 1900. Cox, Frank P 211 Ocean St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Cox, May Vaughan 211 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Cross, Alfred 14 Chase St. 

" Cross, Charles A 8 Chase St. 

March 27, 1900. Currier, Benjamin W 13 Deer Cove 

April 26, 1900. TJarcy, Alice M ,54 Commercial St. 

Ajml 27, 1897. Darcy, .John W 54 Commercial St. 

Juli/ 28, 1899. Davis, Lydia C 34 Baltimore St. 

Dec. 24, 1898. Dow, Charles L 265 Boston St. 

March 18, 1899. Dunn, Anna Lincoln 22 Portland St. 

3/arc/t 8, 1901. Durland, Henrietta 83 Chestnut St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Dwyer, Elmer F 34 Maple St. 

^pr(7 27, 1897. Earle, Anthony 110 Henry Ave. 

" Earle, Louise Snow 110 Henry Ave. 

if ctrc/i 18, 1899. Earle, Mabel 110 Henry Ave. 

Bee. 22, 1897. Emerson, Philip 9 Beede Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Faulkner, Walter 33 Endicott St. 

• March 12, 1900. Fenton, Michael Angelo 740 Boston St. 

Jubj 28, 1899. French, Hartwell S 1 Atlantic St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



47 



Ajiril 21, IS91. *Fry, Charles Coffin Ill Laiglitdn St. 

Fuller, Addie G 26 Vine St. 

" Fuller, Charles Sylvester 26 Vine St. 

" Galloupe, Isaac Francis i;} Park St. 

" Galloupe, Lydia Ellis 13 Park St. 

" Garrison, William Lloyd Boston 

Juhj 28, 1899. Goldthwait, Martha E 18 Portland St. 

.42)r(7 27, 1897. Goodell, Abner Cheney, Jr 4 Federal St., Salem 

" Goodell, .Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Goodridge, Charles Sewell 79 Johnson St. 

Apinl 27, 1897. Goodridge, Gertrude May 5 Prescott Place 

March 8, 1901. Goodridge, Micajah N. . • 109 High Eock Ave. 

March 12, 1900. Goodwin. Daniel W 92 Xewhall St. 

Dec. 24, 1898. Gove, AVilliam H 254 Lafayette St., Salem 

April 27, 1897. Graham, George Herbert 62 Commercial St. 

" Graves, Isaiah Ill Fayette St. 

" Green, Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Green, Mary A 1 Fayette Place 

Oct. 26, 1900. Green, Jennie B. 1 Fayette Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Greene, Robert II 369 Summer St. 

" Greene, Susan A 369 Summer St. 

" Grover, Charles S lOGroverSt. 

April 27, 1897. Guilford, Samuel A 30 Bedford St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Gutterson, Annie M 912 Western Ave. 

" Gutterson, Eliza C 912 Western Ave. 

Gutterson, Emily X 912 Western Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Hacker, Sallie H 201 Ocean St. 

Jlfarc/t 26, 1901. Harney, Elizabeth 73 Baker St. 

April 7, 1899. Halliday, Marion 35 King's Beach Terrace 

Bee. 28, 1899. Hallowell, Caroline A 42 Hanover St. 

Apn-il 27, 1897. Hannan, Joseph F 30 Rogers Ave. 

" Harmon, Maria B 89 Xorth Common St. 

" Harmon, Bollin E 89 North Common St. 

" Harris, Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

Nov. 28, 1899. Hastings, Charles H 163 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Hawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremont St. 

May 20, 1898. Hawkes, Samuel Saugus 

April 27, 1897. Hawks, Esther H 16 Newhall St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hayes, Amy Augusta 43 Eastern Ave. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Hayes, t\\\m B 43 Eastern Ave. 



48 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27, 1S07. Heath, Caroline Putnam 132 South Common St. 

" Heath, Henry Warren 109 Hollingsworth St. 

Jiili/ 28, 1899. Henderson, Abhy M 79 Xahant St. 

March IS. 1899. Herbert, George C 17 Chatham St. 

SejH. 9, 1898. Hill, Alfred C East Saugus 

Marrh26, 1901. Hill, Charlotte Farnsworth 14 Summer Place 

" Hill, George Barnum 120 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1897. Hill, Susan T 14 Summer Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hilliard, Alma V 11 N'ew Ocean St. 

April 21, [891. Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 

" Hilton, Eliza A 16 Henry Ave. 

Dec 28, 1900. Hixon, Lucilla D 65 Baker St. 

" Hixon, Warren S 65 Baker St. 

April 27, 1899. Hitchings, James W 21 Wave St. 

March 27, 1900. Holder, Harriet E 9 Tapley St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Holder, William C 12 Park St. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Holmes, Lucy T 67 North Common St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hood, Julia Pond 18 Sachem St. 

A2)ril 27, 1897. Houghton, John Clarkson 29 Vine St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Houghton, Maria L 33 Breed St. 

Nov. 28, 1899. Houghton, S. Ellen 1 Light St. 

April 27, 1897. Howe, Oliver Paymond 20 Bedford St. 

April 27, 1899. Huntington, Alice B 181 Allen Ave. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Hunt, D. Gage 142 Maple St. 

Dec. 14, 1898. Ingalls, Edwin W 98 Laighton St. 

April 27, 1897. Ingalls, Emma F 229 Ocean St. 

" Ingalls, J. Fred 605 Western Ave. 

" Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls, Jerome 229 Ocean St. 

3Iay 20, 1898. Ingalls, Mary Mower 189 Essex St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Ingalls, Robert Collyer 229 Ocean St, 

A})ril 7, 1899. Ireson, Samuel S . 170 South Common St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. James, Frank M 127 Nahant St. 

Nov. 24, 1897. Johnson, Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

A.2yril 27, 1897. Johnson, Andrew Dudley .... Winter St., East Saugus 

" Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Xewhall' 109 Xahant St. 

" Johnson, David N 101 Xewhall St. 

" Johnson, Elliott Clarke ....*. 62 Mall St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



49 



Aj>ril 7, 1800. Johnson, Emma linrt 101 Newiiall St. 

April 27, 1807, Johnson, Enoch Staffonl 55 Atlantic St. 

Johnson, Henry W OS Sonth Connnon St. 

^Iprii 7, 1899. Johnson, Lizzie Bishop LSI North Connnon St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Lnther S 220 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22, 1897. Johnson, Lydia Hacker . . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

Dec. 28, 1900. Johnson, Maria L (j2 Mall St. 

Ajn-U 7, 1899. Johnson, Mary May 220 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1807. Johnson, Virginia Newliall 100 Nahant St. 

" Keene, Frank 17 Atlantic St. 

iVoy. 2;], 1899. Keene, William Oerry 11 Grosvenor Park 

March 18, 1899. Keith, Emma IJarnard 34 Nahant St. 

i/rtrc/;26, 1901. Keith, Ira B 34 Naliant St. 

April 27, 1897. Kenney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

Off. 11, 1800. Kent, Harriet .Marshall 112 Green St. 

J"r(H. 10, 1900. Kimball. Frank W 120 Washington St. 

ylprt7 27, 1897. Kimball, Knfus 54 Ilarwood St. 

./a». 10, 1900. Kindjall, Sylvia H 120 Washington St. 

April 27, 1807. Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill Ave. 

,/(n/c ], 1S07. Lamper, Sarah E I(! King's Beach Terrace 

3f (H-cA 12, 1000. Lee, Caroline S 13 West Baltimore St. 

" Lee, Nehemiah 13 West Baltimore St. 

Dec. 20, 1000. Lewis, Carrie Shillaber 31 Bnrrill Ave. 

May 20, 1898. Lewis, Charles W. . . '. 140 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1897. Lewis, Jacob Meek 8 Fayette St. 

Jan. 27, 1890. Little, Mary F 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

" Little, AV^illiam B 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

April 7, 1899. Littlefield, Horatia A 35 Franklin St. 

April 18, 1898. Littlefield, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

April 7, 1809. Littlefield, William Bradbury 35 Franklin St. 

Sept. 4, 1900. Loring, John L 27 Violet St. 

May 20, 1898. Lummus, Henry Tilton 4 Hudson St. 

April 20, 1900. Lummus, Lucinda M 43 Cherry St. 

April 27, 1897. Lummus, William W 43 Cherry St. 

" Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

" Mansfield. Perley B 19 Nichols St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Marsh, George E 12 Ireson Ave. 

" Marsh, James M 12 Ireson Ave. 

3/(frf// 8, 1901. Martin, Angle P 388 Summer St. 

4 



50 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

March 12, 1900. Martin, Augustus B 17 High Rock Ave. 

jlpril 27, 1897. Martin, (4eorge Henry 388 .Summer St. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Martin, .Tames P 24 Sachem St. 

^pn7 27, 1897. Matthews, Harriet L 42 Hanover St. 

June 1, 1897. McArthur, Annie E 07 Nortli Common St. 

April2G, 1900. Melntire, Frederick M. . . . KiOO Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

March 27, 1897. IMerriil, Albert K 9 Henry Ave. 

" ]\[erriil, Harriet E 9 Henry Ave. 

,l^^;/7 27, 1S97. Moore, Artliur Scudder .54 Mall St. 

Joji. 29, 1900. Moore, .Julia , 1 72 Fayette St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Mor.se. M. Louise 309 Summer St. 

April 27, 1897. Moulton, Daniel P. 30 Sagamore St. 

" Moulton, James T 12 Carnes St. 

" Moulton, Katherine R 71 Federal St. 

" Mower, Earl Augustus ... 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

" Mower, Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

Jan. 29, 1900. Mudge, Ann Amelia 84 Green St. 

y| prii 27, 1897. JNIudge, Arthur Bartlett 27 Greystone Park 

/Jr'r. 28, 1900. Mudge, Pamelia H llTj Green St. 

" Mullin, James D .58 Newhall St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Mullin, Sarah Abby .58 Newhall St. 

March 26, 1901. Neal, Lydia C 1022 Washington St, 

^?)n7 27, 1897. Neal, Peter Morrell 1022 Wa.shington St. 

Neal, William E 1022 Washington St. 

jVr^D. 23, 1899. Neill, Charles F ]7BassettSt. 

Neill, Eliza J 17 Bassett St. 

M(irch2G,19()\. Newhall, Annie Louise 72 Broad St. 

July 28, 1899. Newhall, Annie Pepperell 305 Essex St. 

Ajrril 21, \S91. Xewhall, A.sa Tarbell 489 Lynn field St. 

" Newhall, Charles Henry 14 West Baltimore St. 

JVoo. 23, 1899. Newhall, Frances H 10 Deer Park 

Feb. 20, 1900. Newhall, Francis S 18 Baltimore St. 

J»fa/Y7t 27, 1900. Newhall, George H 343 Chatham St. 

April 27, 1897. Newhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

Feb. 2, 1901. Newhall, Hattie C 23 Atlantic St. 

Airril 27, 1897. Newhall, Howard INIudge .5 Prescott Place 

" Newhall, Israel Augustus .25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, James Silver 132 South Common St. 

" Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

" Newhall, Kittle May 5 Prescott Place 

" • Newhall, Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, Marion Went worth . . .132 South Common St. 



I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 5 1 

J(r». 11, 18!»0. Newhall, Mary Elizabeth 09 Newliall St. 

April 21, ISdl. Newhall, Sarah Eflie 19 I'ark St. 

" Newhall, Stephen Cyrus 22 Atlantie St. 

" Newhall, Terry Arilen ('.9 Newhall St. 

" Newhall, Wilbur Fisk . . . 74 Ijineoln Ave., East Saugus 

" Newhall, William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

" Nichols, Bessie Frances o2 Cherry St. 

" Nichols, Frank Herbert 410 Summer St. 

" Nichols, Fred Hammond 10 Prospect St. 

April 7, 1S99. Nichols, Fred M 1.5 Essex Court 

.l/*)-/7 27, 1897. Nicliols, Richard Johnson ,32 Cherry St. 

'• Nicliols, Thomas Parker 11 Prospect St. 

Drc. 24, 1898. Northrup, Arthur .1 20 Baker St. 

" Northrup, Hattie E 20 Baker St. 

Feb. 2, 1001. Norton, Joseph C 30 Grove St. 

" Norton, Sarah S 30 Grove St. 

April 7, 1899. Noyes, Mary A 235 Summer St. 

3/arc// 2(3, 1901. O'Keefe, Mary A 414 Broadway 

J/)r(7 27, 1897. Oliver, James W 09 Iliiih Kock St. 

-/a)i. 29, 1900. Oliver, Pachel Louise 99 Beacon Hill Ave. 

July 29, 1901. Osborne, Archer Preble 694 Western Ave. 

-/»/)f' 1, 1897. O'Shea, William 112 Market St. 

Jan. 29, 1900. Parke, Emma F 36 Xaliant Place 

April26, WOO. Parker, Amelia J 37 Phillips Ave. 

Oct. 26, 1900. Parker, Harriet Fitts 28 Lowell St. 

April 27, 1897. Parker, John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

Jan. 11, 1899. Parrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherry St. 

" Parsons, Katharine M 106 F'ranklin St. 

A}iril 27, 1897. Parsons, Mary A Lynnfield Centre 

" Patten, Frank Warren 370 Summer St. 

" Patten, Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

" Paul, John M 9 Farrar St. 

" Paul, Lucy F 9 Farrar St. 

" Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

Or/. 11, 1899. Percival, Mary E 79 North Common St. 

^I^))v7 27, 1897. Pevear, Henry A 159 Washington St. 

March 10, 1898. Pevear, iSIary F. 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

A2n-il 27, 1897. Pevear, Sarah E 159 Washins^ton St. 

Der. 24, 1898. Pevear, Waldo L 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Phillips, Anna Pvacillia 35 Bassett St. 

J^n-i? 27, 1897. Phillips, Arlhur John 35 Bassett St. 



52 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Jan. 27, 1899. riiillips, Sarah E 21 Lewis St. 

.•Ip/-i7 27, 1S97. Pickford, Anna M IGG Washington St. 

Pinkham, Emily G (i4 Nahant St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Pool, Howard F ! 72 Johnson St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Pool, Lena B 72 Johnson St. 

.l/x-i/ 18, 1898. Porter, Bertha Currier . .' 101 Fayette St. 

" Porter, Margaret Ellen 101 Fayette St. 

April 27, 1897. Porter, Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 

April 7, 1899. Prichard, Charles F 17 Sagamore St. 

April 27, 1897. Putnam, Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

" Putnam, Hannah V 40 Fayette St. 

" Richards, James H 72 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Robinson, Elizabeth F 47 Commercial St. 

Jane 1, 1897. Robinson, William Pitt . 17o9 17th St., Washington, D.C. 

March 12, 1900. Rogers, Abraham L. . • . .311 West 97th St., New York 

" Rogers, Emmelyn S. . . . oil West 97th St., New York 

April 27, 1897. Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Henry Warren 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 

July 28, 1899. Rolfe, Charles E 22 Atlantic St. 

'• Rowell, Frank B 14 Linwood Road 

April 27, 1897. Rule, Elizabeth E 80 Franklin St. 

Mail 20. 1898. Ruppel, Emil F 120 South Common St. 

" Ruppel, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 

Jan. 17. 1900. Sanborn, Charles S 18 King St. 

April 27, 1S97. Sanderson, Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

Sargent, William P 1.51 Chestnut St. 

" Sawyer, Henry A 243 Boston St. 

" Sears, Henry Darrah . 30 Greystone Park 

" Sheldon, Chauncey C 49 Xorth Common St. 

" Sheldon, May L 49 North Common St. 

May V6,mA. Shorey, Martha H 70 High Rock St. 

" Shorey, Susan E 70 High Rock St. 

" Silsbee, Henry 38 Brookline St. 

JV/arcA 12, 1900. Silsbee, Lillian L 60 Breed St. 

7>ec. 28, 1900. Silsbee, Louise E 118 Green St. 

March 12, 1900. Silsbee, N. Everett 60 Breed St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Smith, Joseph N. 232 Ocean St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Smith, Sarah F 232 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Spinney, Benjamin F 270 Ocean St. 

" Spinney, Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 53 

Ai)ril 27, 1SU7. Sprague, Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

" Sprague, Henry Breed .... Walker Uoad, Swampscott 

April 7, lSi)!t. Stetson, Helen liOuise 18 Sachem St. 

March 2('}, lUOl. Stevens, Adeline ir)2 Washington St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Stevens, Gertrude W 100 Johnson St. 

" Stevens, Maurice A 100 .Johnson St. 

April 27, 1897. Stewart, Sanuiel Barrett 141 Ocean St. 

May 20, 1898. Stimpson, Isabelle Bradford 24 Sachem St. 

Nov. 24, 1897. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

^1pn7 27, 1897. Stone, William ". . . 23 Lyman St. 

Oct. 11, 1899. Sweetser, ilary Abby ,55 Baltimore St. 

Jan. 10, 1900. Sweetser, Mary Anna .... Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

Feb. 2, 1901. *Symonds, Annie W 57 Xahant St. 

April 27, 1897. Symonds, Walter E • 57 Nahant St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Symonds, Warren L 57 Nahant St. 

April 27, 1897. Tapley, Amos Preston lioston 

" Tapley, Henry Fuller 280 Ocean St. 

Tapley, Ida J . 280 Ocean St. 

" Tarbox, .James E 102 Federal St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Tebbetts, Georgiana B 37 Baltimore St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Tebbetts, Kate B 23 Wentworth Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Tebbetts, Theodore C 37 Baltimore St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Tillman, Hannah Dixon 174 Broadway 

Jane 1, 1897. Tirrell, Sarah E South Weymouth, Mass. 

April 27, 1897. Tozzer, Samuel Clarence 62 Xahant St. 

iVorr// 27, 1900. Tripp, Thaxter N 11 Baltimore St. 

" Tucker, Bertha B 44 Hamilton Ave. 

" Tucker, Emma A 44 Hamilton Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Usher, Edward Preston ... Grafton, Mass. 

" Van Bureu, James Heartt .... San Juan, Porto ilico. 
Xoc. 23, 1899. Vogel, Frederick M 54 Elm St. 

Jul;/ 28, 1899. AValter, Mary E 2729 Prairie Ave, Chicago, 111. 

J(UJ. 11, 1899. Warner, Ellen L 17 Baltimore St. 

" Warner, John G 17 Ualtimore St. 

3/ctrt7i 12, 1900. Watrous, Grace Greenwood Schenectady, N.Y. 

A2}ril 27, 1897. Watters, William 20 South Common St. 

" Whitman, Joseph Henry 10 Sherman Terrace 

Mai/ 20, 1898. Whitman, Mary Ashcroft . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Williams, George Hamilton, Woodland Ave., Swampscott 



54 I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

March 8. 1901. Wilson, Alice N 22 Henry Ave. 

March 12, 1900. Wilson, Faustina Cliadwell 423 Summer St. 

JVov. 23, 189!». Witherell, Eunice Smith 22 Portland St. 

Ajirll 27, 1897. Witherell, Ivers L 22 Portland St. 

" Wood, Lana J 10 Franklin St. 

" Woodbury, Charles J. II 61 Commercial St. 

Uec. 22, 1897. Woodbury, Jennie Russell (50 Atlantic Terrace 

Aprii 27, 1897. AVoodbury, John 00 Atlantic Terrace 

" AVoodbury, John P Boston 

April 26, 1900. Woodbury, JMaria B 01 Commercial St. 

Jan. 10, VJOO. Young, Annah A ... . 19 Garland St. 

" Young, Elbridge S 19 Garland St, 

J/arr// 20, 1901. Young, Herbert W 85 North Common St. 



■ Deceased since 11)01 Annual Rleetinj 



T 



Ill: P1:(.LSTI:I> 



LviAiA Historic ell Socieiv, 



LYNN, nASSACHLisrrrs., 



ro\^ TIM: \\zl\\} 1^)0 1 




LYNX. MASS. 

WIUTTEX & CASS, PRINTERS. 
1 902 . 



f1^ 



Gift 

The Society 

1 e'03 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1902. 



Prcsiihiif. 

BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Vicc-Prcsidoit. 

GEORGE H. MARTIN. 

Treasurer. 

EUGENE A. PUTNAM. 

Rccor(h')ii^ Sccrcta ry. 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL 

Corrcs/ioi/dii/i^ Sccrcfarv. 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Ciiakles H. Newhall. 

George H. Martin. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

George S. Bliss. James S. Newhall. 

William 8. Burrill. John L. Parker. 

PiULH' A. Chase. Charles F. Peirce. 

Nathan M. IIawkes. Eugene A. Putnam. 

RuFUs Kimball. Henry F. Tatley 

Earl A. Mower. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



COMMITTEES. 



Cushxiidiis 



William S. Bikkill. 
Gkorge S. Bliss. 
Henkv N. Comey. 



Eakl a. Mowkr. 
Charles F. Peirc k 



Philip A. Chase. 

LlIHER S. JOHNSON. 



Fiinnii 



Eugene A. Pitnam. 
Henry B. Sprague. 



To Sfriirc Publicaiio)! of Old I'or^ii ]\icor(h 



Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Philip A. Chase. 



RoLLiN E. Harmon. 
John \\oi>iJBi ry. 



To Procure I )i formation front E/dcrlv C/h'zcns. 



Charles Buffum. 
S. Oliver Breed. 
Samuel A. Guilford. 

LsAAC K. PLVRRIS. 

George C. Herbert. 



David X. Johnson. 
Henry W.Johnson. 
James H. Richards. 
William P. Sargent 
William Stone. 



I^cctitrcs mid Public Meetings. 

Henry F. Tapley. Mary F. Little. 

William S. Burrill. George H. Martin. 

Harriet K. Clough. Charles \\. Newhall. 

MiCAjAH P. Clough. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

LouTisE S. Earle. May L. Sheldon. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



< ic>/('(l/l>i>'V. 



John L. Parker. 
Joanna A. Bibier. 
Harriet K. Clough. 
Nathan M. Havvke.s. 
Susan T. Hill. 
John C. Houghton. 
Anna L. Johnson. 



Enoch S. Johnson. 
Melissa J. Littlefield. 
Harriet L. Matthews. 
Sarah S. Norton. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Hannah V. Putnam. 
Warren L. S^■Mo^I)s. 



Pii/'licd/ioiis 



Howard Mudge Newhall. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
James S. Newhall. 



ii/(f Piiiitiiiff. 

Henry F. Tapley. 
John G. W.vrner. 



Geor(;e S. Bliss. 
Edwaro F. Bai heller. 



PIiotooriip/iY. 

Charles A. Cross. 

J<iHN W. I)\[U\'. 



Collection of II hioiiral Relief. 



Henry N. Comey. 
Emma H. Breed. 
Stephen L. Breed. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 
C.\Roi,iNE P. Heath. 



Mary A. Parsons. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Anna R. Phillh's. 
Arthuk J. Phui-H's. 
Ida [. Tapi.i-Y. 



MaikiiiiS 1 1 istorieol Locatio>if. 



RuFus Kimball. 
Isaac F. Galloipe. 
.\kihi R B. MuDGi-:. 



Richard J. Nichols. 
John L. Parker. 
James 1 1. Ru hakds. 



Nathan M. Hawkes. 
RuFus Kimball. 
George H. ^Fartin. 



Necrolosrv 



Israel A. Newhall. 
Wilbur V. Newhall 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Nathan M. IIawkes. 
John C. 11()1(;hton'. 
Benjamin N. Johnson 
David N. Johnson 
George II. Martin. 



Cowpildlhm of Loral I/is/ory. 

Harriet L. Matthews. 
Israel A. Nevvhai.l. 
Wii.iu'R F. Newhall. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Eeizaheth E. Rri.E. 



(iroloi^'V (n/(/ Botaiiv. 



Albion Hai.e Brainard. 
LiLLiE B. Allen. 
Luther Atwood. 
Charles Neal Barney. 
Elmer F. Dwyer. 
Mahel Earle. 

PhII.H' liMERSON. 



HENR^ W. Heath. 
Henry T. Ll.m.mi s. 
James M. Marsh. 
M. Elizabeth Newhall 
Myra D. Allen Ruppel 
Chaunce^' C. Sheldon. 
S. Clarence Toz/kk. 



1\ crept ion . 



Sallie H. Hacker. 
Ella D. Bartlett. 
M. Nellie Buiher. 
Lydia C. Davis. 
Anna L. Dunn. 
Addie G. Fuller. 
Maria B. Harmon. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Maky M. Johnson 



\'iR(;iNiA N. Johnson. 
KiTTiE M. Newhall. 
Marion W. Newhall. 
Katharine M. Parsons. 
Sarah F. Smith. 
Sarah S. Spinney. 
Ida J. Tapley. 
Ellen L. Warner. 
Jennie R. W'oodiu uy. 



and Mi'.MiiEUs of the Council. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BY-LAWS. 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Membersliip shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues lor two years. 

ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second 
Wednesday evening in January, time and place to be deter- 
mined by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. A less number 
may adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direc- 
tion of the Council, or President, and shall be called upon 
the written request of twenty members. 

ARTICLE III. 

COUNCII,. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate ofiicers and agents, and make all necessaiy 
rules and regulations for itself and them. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



ARTICLE IV. 



OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretaiy, and 
Treasurer, who shall be elected annually by ballot, from 
the members of the Council. They shall perform the 
usual duties of such officers, and such other duties as the 
Council nia\^ require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on Jul}- ilrst of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularl}' called, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



THE MEETING-HOUSE 

Of the Third Parish in Lynn or of the " Society of the Proprietors of tiie 
new Meetiny-house in the western end of the town of Lvnn." 



Tlie histm-ii-al skctcli of the nld Meetin.ti'-housc was contrilniti-il by 
Ilmi. Xatiian Mortimer IIawkes. 



Up to 1782 what is now the town of LYnnfield con- 
stituted the North or Second Parish of L3ain. In that 
year L3'nnfield was set off from the town as a District. 
Subsequently the Saugus Parish was known as the Second 
Parish of Lynn instead of the Third. 

" The Society of Proprietors of the New Meeting- 
house in the Western end of tlie Town of Lynn " was the 
name of what later became the Meeting-house of the 
Third Parish of Lynn. 

It was built by the people of the west end of the town 
as proprietors because the First Parish successfulh' opposed 
the setting up of a new parish. 

The same arguments were used as in the case of the 
North or Lynnfield parish, namely, distance and incon- 
Yenience of traYelling down to worship in the old parish 
meeting-house on the Common. 

The moYement to secure a separate place of worship 
took definite form when William Taylor on JuIy i, 1736, 
conveyed to Thomas Cheever, Jonathan Waite and John 
Waite a parcel of land "for divers good causes and con- 
siderations but more especially to encourage the building 
of a meeting-house for the public worship of God " which 
includes what is now the public square whereon stands the 
Soldiers' Monument in Saugus Centre and the old burying 
ground lying to the west. 



lO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

William Taylor was a prominent citizen of the place, 
the son of James Taylor, who for many years was the 
Treasurer of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. 

Through the marriage of William Taylors daughter, 
Anna, to Benjamin Parker, his blood and his influence 
have ever since been potent in the aflairs of the Parish 
and Town of Saugus. 

The building which still stands, though degraded in 
use and removed across the road to the north, stood upon 
what was then a little knoll. It was forty-five feet six inches 
in length by thirty-five feet eight inches in width with posts 
twenty feet in height. It had three doors, two of which 
opened directly into the room of worship, while on the 
south side was the main door with a large porch into which 
were three entrances. When finally abandoned as a church 
edifice there was a single entrance at the west end. It 
had galleries and sounding board but never had a steeple 
or cupola and was as plain and austere and homely as all 
the Puritan meeting-houses were. . The building was com- 
pleted in 1737. 

The proprietors organized under a general law of the 
Province authorizing the owners of lands held in common 
to form themselves into an association. 

By so associating they could govern themselves sub- 
stantially in the same manner as a parish. 

The General Court gave them a share of the income 
of the First Parish " to maintain preaching among them- 
selves during the more diflicult seasons of the year." 

In 1738, Edward Cheever, a graduate of Harvard of 
1737, then twenty-one years of age, a resident of the West 
End became the first minister of the congregation and the 
only minister of the proprietors as distinct from the later 
organized parish. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIF/IV. 1 1 

After a struggle of twelve 3^ears on Januarv 27, 
1749-50, a joint committee of the General Court reported 
in favor of the new parish. 

At the tirst meeting of the parish Fehruary 2, 1750, it 
was voted "That the parish did concur with the cluu-ch 
and made choice of Mr. Joseph Rohy to be settled in the 
work of the ministry in said parish." 

Thereafter, for the period of fifty-two years. Parson 
Roby faithfully and efficiently served the parish and 
church as minister and friend. He died January 31, 1803, 
and his name and quaint-marked tombstone may be seen 
in the old burying-ground across the way. 

Like so many of the old Puritan churches, this one was 
a storm centre of the ecclesiastical duels of the tirst half of 
the nineteenth century. The Universalists won in the end 
and occupied it until i860 when it was sold and remoxed 
to its present site. 

Whoever seeks to know more of the house may be 
referred to the exhaustive and sympathetic Historical Ad- 
dress upon the Third Church in Lynn, delivered b}^ Ben- 
jamin N. Johnson at its 150th Anniversary, October 13, 
1887. 

See also sketches of Saugus by Benjamin F. Newhall, 
printed in Lynn Reporter in 1862 and 1863, which it is 
hoped will sometime be printed in a more convenient form. 

We are indebted to Mr. Charles A. Lawrence tor the 
pen-and-ink sketch from which the illustration of the old 
buildinrr was made. 



12 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL, Recording Secretary, 

At tlK' Kiftli Anmiul Mucting of the- Scu-icty. at tlie Kooin of tin- Society. 
Wednesday p^veniiii;. januaiy S, 1902. 



The membership of the Society at the end of the fiftli 
year has increased to fonr hundred and forty-four, eighty 
new members having been elected during the year, and 
ten applications now being on file for election at the Janu- 
ary meeting of the newly elected Council, thus making the 
Lynn Historical Society one of the large societies of the 
State in point of membership. This large membership 
gives an assurance of increasing usefulness and a proper 
amount of money to do the work which the Society ought 
to do. The present year, with the purchase of cases, the 
entertainment of visiting societies, and the removal of the 
rooms, has brought unusual expenses, but great enjoyment 
with them also. Tiiree members have died during the 
year: General Charles C. Fry, Hon. Joseph G. Brown, 
and Mrs. Annie W. Symonds, two of whom were among 
the number who signed the original call for the first meet- 
ing of the Society on December i8, 1896. 

The first meeting of the year after the annual meeting 
was held on Thursday evening, February 21, at which 
time an interesting paper was read by Mr. William Stone, 
on the, subject of " Lynn, and its old time Slioemaker's 
Shops." 

On Thursday evening, March 21, a paper which had 
been prepared by Mr. Charles Buffum was read bv Mr. 
William Stone, entitled, '' The Stvle of Living, Habits, 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCUiTV. 13 

Manners and Customs of the People of Lynn earh' in the 
Last Century." 

On Thursday evening, April 25, a paper was read by 
Mr. Charles E. Mann on the subject of '^ The Old Hart 
House," which stood at the corner of Boston and North 
Federal streets. A paper was also read bv Mrs. Susan T. 
Hill, entitled "Old Time Schools and School-houses." At 
this meeting Mr. George H. Martin spoke of a curious fact 
he had found in connection with the old Parish records 
that the schools of the town were evidently owned and con- 
ducted by the parish. 

On Thursday evening, May 16, a meeting was ar- 
ranged by the Committee on Genealogv, with a paper on 
the subject of Genealogy by Capt. John L. Parker, Chair- 
man of the Committee. The paper, as intended, brought 
out an interesting discussion, participated in by several 
ladies and gentlemen of the Society, and by Mr. Mcintosh 
of the Peabody Historical Societ^' who was pr,esent. The 
meeting was ideal in the number of those taking part, and 
was one of the Society's most interesting and protitable 
meetings. 

On Monday, June 17th, the Historical Societies of 
Essex County spent the day in Lynn Woods, by invitation 
of the Lynn Society. The day was most propitious and 
an ideal day for such an occasion. The headquarters in 
the Woods were made near the summit of Mount Gilead, 
and tramping parties visited Dungeon Rock, Wolf Pits, 
Rocking Boulder, Weetamoo Cliff and Frog Boulder. 
Remarks w'ere made by Benjamin N. Johnson, Esq., Presi- 
dent of the Societ}', Philip A. Chase, Esq., Hon. Nathan 
M. Hawkes, all of whom spoke of Lynn and Lynn Woods, 
and were follow'ed by Hon. Robert S. Rantoul of Salem, 
Rev. Mr. Hovey of Newburyport, E, Moody Boynton, Esq. 



H 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



of Newburyport, Judge Ira A. Abbott of Haverhill, and 
John W. Hutchinson of Lynn. 

On Wednesday, August 14, by invitation of the Pea- 
body Historical Society, the Society visited the former home 
of John Proctor, hanged for witchcraft at Salem, August 
19, 1692. In the afternoon there were several interesting 
speeches in the grove where the farewell picnic dinner to 
George Peabody was given August 13, 1857. 

On Thursday evening, October 17, a paper was read 
by Ezra D. Hines, Esq., Assistant Register of Probate of 
Essex Count}', and member of the Danvers Historical 
Society on the subject of "The March of Arnold and his 
men from Cambridge to Qiiebec." 

On Saturday afternoon, October 19, by invitation of 
Hon. and Mrs. Asa T. Newhall, a large number of the 
Society visited their home on Lynntield street, where seven 
generations of the Newhall family have lived. The mem- 
bers were generousl}' and bountifully entertained, and the 
host and hostess with their family made it a very pleasant 
occasion. 

December i, 1901, the Society removed from the 
building of the Lynn Institution for Savings and First 
National Bank, No. 25 Exchange street, to the building of 
the L3'nn Gas and Electric Company, No. 90 Exchange 
street. The new rooms comprise a well-arranged hall for 
meetings, a small hall for exhibition of the property of the 
Society, two coat rooms, and a committee room. The 
Society has a lease of the rooms for five years, with the 
privilege of renewal for five years. The first meeting in 
the new rooms was on Thursday evening, January 2, 1902, 
the occasion being a social evening, at which about two 
hundred members of the Society were present. 

The Monday afternoon teas were held by the ladies of 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 5 

the Reception Committee during January, February and 
March, 1901, and the first meeting for 1902 was held on 
January 6. These occasions are well attended by mem- 
bers of the Society and their friends, giving an opportunity 
to visit the rooms, and examine the objects of interest 
which have been presented to the Society, and creating an 
interest among manv to become members. 

The following gifts have been received by the Society 
during the year : 

From Edward B. Newhall, one pah' old style shoes ; and wooden 
sole pattern. 

From Frank M. James, photograph of monument in George- 
town ; bag of old coins. 

From Philip A. Chase, old three dollar Nahant bank note. 

From the City of Lynn, volume containing account of fiftieth 
anniversary municipal celebration. 

From Nathaniel Melcher, linen handkerchief which was the 
property of Nathaniel Ingalls. 

From J. Warren Cars well, ruffling iron. 

From Lydia E. Galloupe, subscription for Omnibus line from 
Breed's wharf to Lynn Hotel ; poem, petition of Town of 
Lynn for fence around the Common ; fifty-five old rewards 
of merit; tuition bill of 1833; and other papers. 

From the City of Lynn, the first mayor's chair, used by George 
Hood, first mayor. 

From George C. Herbert, framed photograph of Breed and 
Bassett's wharf on Commercial street in 1S67. 

From St. Stephen's church, loan of small organ pipes from the 
organ in St. Margaret's church, King's Lynn, England. 

From Harriet E. Holder, fine assortment of plates and crockery 
used in family of late Nathaniel Holder; Canton sugar 
bowl; tea-pot; wine glasses; pitcher; glass tumbler. 

From Salem Public Library, Trustees' Report. 

From Medford Historical Society, publications. 



l6 LV.XX HISTORICAL .SOCIIiTV. 

From Essex Institute, publications. 

From West Newbury Historical Society, publications. 

From Maiden Public Library, annual report. 

From Marblehead Public Library, annual report. 

From Ipswich Historical vSociety, publications. 

From Lowell Old Residents Association, publications. 

From New England Historic and Genealogical Society, publica- 
tions. 

From Dummer Academy, annual report. 

From Nantucket Historical vSociety, publication and pamphlet, 
giving record of Nantucket land and owners. 

From Bostonian Society, catalogue of Colburn collection. 

From Bridgewater Historical Society, publication. 

From Isaac K. Harris, oriole's nest. 

From Mrs. George C. Houghton, catalogue of loan exhibition 
by Daughters of the Revolution. 

From Mrs. Arie G. Melcher, seraphim. 

From Alfixd Cross, programme of laying the corner stone of the 
First M. E. Church; list of members First M. E. Church, 
1900; an ancient plate. 

From Charles A. Harvvood, a Washington army button; Harri- 
son button; old English coin, 1724; three sharks' teeth; 
two hand made nails from old Bowler house, Glenmere; 
five petrified clams found in cliffs at Gay Head ; four old 
keys; five Jackson cents. 

From Emma A. Tucker, ancient plate. 

From Ivers L. Witherell, almanacs; a scrap-book of illustrated 
envelopes collected during the Civil War ; photograph of 
Union street buildings before the erection of the Spinney 
and Blake buildings. 

From Eunice L. Witherell, one pair steelyards, 1813; one tea- 
pot ; one fan painted by Governor Thomas Wilson while in 
prison for high treason in 1S44. 

From Ellen Mudge Burrill, one State of Massachusetts Bay 
Treasury note, 1779. 

From Susan T. Hill, wool cards. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 7 

From an unknown person, an old Empire 5 fire engine com- 
pany hat. 

From Mary A. Noyes, two singing books; 1831 collection of 
hymns ; box of old shoes, shoe tools and shoemaker's apron. 

From Peter M. Neal, an ancient certificate. 

From George H. Waitt, one Royal Standard Dictionary, 1796; 
one Bible, 1814; one certificate signed by Ezra Newhall, 
1793. 

From Hannah V. Putnam, sketch of the life of Rev. Joseph 
Mottey of Lynnfield, 1822. 

From Annie P. Newhall, old painting. 

From Eliza A. Aldworth, counterfeit bill on old Mechanics' Bank. 

From Pamelia B. Mudge, Confederate bill. 

From Harrison Newhall, Lynn Lyceum lecture tickets. 

From Gertrude Emery, old saddle used in coming to Lynn in old 
times. 

From William T. Oliver, original drawing of Market street as it 
appeared in 1820, drawn in 1872 and 1873. 

From Wendell P. Flanders, from the estate of George W. Flan- 
ders, twenty-three old books; almanacs; copies of New- 
buryport Morning Star, 1794; New Hampshire Gazette, 
1807; Boston Investigator, 1835; Boston Daily Chrono- 
type, 1850; Skowhegan Sentinel, 1838; Perpetual Calen- 
dar ; and other publications. 

From Mrs. Charles E. Meader, painting of Daniel Webster's 
house at Marshfield. 

From Joseph G. Brown, umbrella carried by Goold Brown the 
grammarian. 

From Caroline S. Lee, poem recited at the re-opening of the 
Lynn Home for Aged Women by J. Warren Newhall, Jan- 
uary 16, 1888. 

From Henry B. Preble, piece of the Charter Oak at Hartford, 
presented to Nelson Lewis, foreman of Silver Grey Engine 
Company by the mayor of Hartford when the company 
visited Hartford. 



1 8 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Martha G. Robinson, weaving board said to be over two 
hundred years old. 

From William S. Burrill, an old style boot-jack. 

From Massachusetts Secretary of State, Volume VIII of the 
Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution. 

From Samuel A. Halliday, blocks used in printing at the old 
Lynn print works. 

From Mrs. Isaac H. Stearns, hour-glass brought over from Eng- 
land in 1630 in ship Arabella by the first Isaac Stearns and 
descended to Dr. Isaac H., being the seventh Isaac in direct 
line; trencher brought over by the same ; candle-stick, the 
property of Mrs. Sarah Fillebrown of Mansfield, grand- 
mother of Dr. Isaac H. Stearns; trunk of Dr. Isaac H. 
Stearns, who was surgeon of the Twenty-second Massachu- 
setts Regiment, carried by him through the Civil War; 
overcoat buttons and vest buttons worn by the fourth Isaac 
Stearns in the Revolutionary War; book. Children in the 
Wood; Youth's Companion of 1S34; gravy tureen, prop- 
erty of Betsey Baker, who died in 1800 and which was 
then very aged ; two knots for looping back pulpit curtains 
in Westminister, taken down in 1S36; tongs; and a book. 

From Birney H. Robidou, clock made by Jesse Frost in Lynn 
in 1834. 

From a friend of Charles F. Peirce, dedication programme of 
the latest High School-house. 

From Henry O. Fox, copy of Ulster County Gazette, contain- 
ing account of funeral of George Washington. 

From William H. Sisson, shoe tools made by him, and used by 
him for fifty years. 

From Elizabeth C. Osborn for herself and the Feabody Histori- 
cal Society, two copies of the Lynn Tattler ; copy of 
Forum; report of Lynn School Committee, 1847-1S48; 
report of Accounts, 1852, 

From Francis H. Lee of Salem, medal. 

From Howard Mudge Newhall, programmes of the entertain- 
ment of Porto Rican guests, and pamphlets. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



19 



From the Misses M. iVnnie Phillips and LucIHa A. Phillips, a 
painting of Eben Breed, who was instrumental in having 
legislation passed favorable to the shoe manufacture in early 
days. 

From Otis Upham, framed photograph of the building corner of 
Exchange and Spring streets before the Lynn conflagration 
of 18S9, formerly occupied by Lucian Newhall, Charles B. 
Tebbetts, and Hood, Johnson & Co. 

From Wilder T. Bowers, lantern slides of Nathan Breed, James 
N. Buffum, Isaiah Breed, Parsons Cooke, Micajah Pratt, 
David Rodman, Interior old Public Library, 1876, Lynn 
Harbor, 1S56, from High Rock, another view of Lynn Har- 
bor from High Rock, 1856, and Lynn from High Rock, 
1S56; the views of Lynn Harbor from High Rock may at 
some day be very valuable, as they were taken at low tide, 
and show the location of the flats before any harbor im- 
provements were made. 

From William H. Gerrish, a State of Massachusetts lottery 
ticket of 1790, 

From Asa T. Newhall, a scrap-book containing the letters and 
telegrams received from all parts of the United States and 
the world, in connection with the Lynn conflagration of 
November 26, 1889. 

From Frank Keene, an original Alonzo Lewis History of Lynn, 
printed in four parts in pamphlet form. 

From Mrs. M. H. Vennard, volumes as follows: Hymns and 
poems of Rev. Isaac Watts ; Constitution of Massachusetts, 
1807; Memory of Washington, 1800; Grecian History by 
Dr. Goldsmith, 1834; History of New England, 1820; 
Jedediah Morse and Elijah Parish ; French War, General 
Stark, 1 83 1. 

From Charles L. Alley, Poem of Cyrus M. Tracy at the dedica- 
ation of the City Hall in 1867 ; catalogue of the Lynn High 
School, 1867; Constitution of the Lynn Assembly, 18S1 ; a 
piece of the old elm on Boston Common. 



20 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From the will of Frances Ellen Mullen, by Daniel B. Moulton, 
the executor, one pair of gilt decanters ; one gilt glass water 
jar ; all over one hundred years old ; and three cups and 
saucers over one hundred and fifty years old. This is the 
first bequest ever, made under any will to the Lynn Histor- 
ical Society. The fine specimens of glass candle covers 
which belonged to Mrs. Washington Haven were given by 
her direction, by her daughter, after her decease, and these 
two are the only two instances thus far in which the Society 
has been so remembered. Considering the comparatively 
recent formation of the Society it is remarkable that we have 
been thus early remembered. 

From Charles H. Hastings, photograph of the old Goodridge 
house on Western avenue. 

From Flora H. Breed, an old history of the United States. 

From George Z. Collins, steelyards once used by Zaccheus 
Collins. 

From Sallie H. Hacker, an old plan of the houses and buildings 
about Lynn Park and Common, a j^icture of George Fox, 
and the loan of valuable deeds, papers, profiles and books. 

From Amos P. Tapley, a shoemaker's shop, whenever the Society 
provides a permanent location for it. 

From Joseph Wesley Breed, old iron mortar and pestle, said to 
have been cast at the old Iron Works over two hundred 
years ago. 

From Mary E. Percival, a tile picture of the old Oliver house. 

From William S. Burrill, a diagram map of railroads diverging 
from Boston, showing the depots and distances. 

From Charles A. Lawrence, a Lynn tax bill of 1815, John 
Mansfield, Jr., collector, and an old shoe store order. 

The Society has also been given the use for the pres- 
ent winter of a beautiful upright piano by Miss Alice J. 
Boynton, formerly of Lynn, but now of Washington, D. C. 

Last year the Secretery referred in his report to the 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 21 

faithful work of the Custodians, and takes occasion this 
year to repeat his words of appreciation for the Society 
with emphasis. The Society owes a great deal of appre- 
ciation and thanks to them. They have had not only the 
regular care and custody of the rooms and collection, but 
have had entire charge, and done all the work excepting 
transportation, and a good deal of that also, from the 
former room to the new rooms. They have placed num- 
bers and names of donors on all the articles belonging to 
the Society, and have arranged a complete card catalogue 
for reference. What they have done has been clearly 
work, and lots of it. The Secretary and members of the 
Council have had more opportunity than most of the mem- 
bers of the Society to know of it, and what they have done 
should be fully known, felt and appreciated. 

The Council, by the By-Laws, is the active body of 
the Society. What has been done by them, and what has 
come before them, can be fully understood by an examina- 
tion of the records of the Recording Secretary. The 
Council meets on the last Monday eyening of each month 
and at such other times as special business ma}^ require. 
They are a very interested Committee as officers, and the 
Society is to be congratulated on the devotion and faithful- 
ness with which they consider its affairs. 

Nine of your Committees are active, hold meetings, 
and fully attend to the work in the departments of the 
Society for which they are appointed. There are some of 
the Committees which do not hold meetings or do any 
work. It would seem to the Secretary, that if the chair- 
manship of the non-active Committees should be given by 
the Council to one of its members, or if regular reports of 
meetings should be required by the Council, it might lead 
to work in departments which are now neglected. This, 



22 LYNN IIISTORICAI. SOCIETY. 

however, is a matter tor the Council to consider, but the 
Secretary feels it can well be sug^gested. 

The preservation of an old-time shoemaker's shop is 
an assured fact. What is known as the old Lye shop will 
be donated by Mr. Amos P. Tapley, whenever the Society 
provides a permanent location. The shop has been placed 
by him on his own land on Mall street temporarily, to re- 
main until such time as the Society provides or obtains the 
suitable and permanent location required. 

The Society can well be pardoned if it should indulge 
in a little self-congratulation. With onl\' live years to its 
credit, it stands with a solid membership of interested 
ladies and gentlemen, with an historical collection well be- 
gun, most attractive rooms, and the knowledge that a great 
deal of historical work has been accomplished. The Soci- 
etv has honored its existence and has been welcomed and 
well supported. Its largest work is belbre it and in the 
future, for which its strong organization, large supporting 
membership and preliminarv work has been preparing it. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 23 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



EUGENE A. PUTNAM, Treasurer, 

in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dr. 

Received from meinhei-ship thios tVom Jan. m. 1901, 

•to Jan. 8, 190J $821 00 

Starr Club, use of rooms 39 00 

Whist party, use of rooms 2 00 

Board of Trade, use of rooms 5 00 

Special cars, Oct. 19 12 85 

Portiaits foi- 1900 Register 105 00 

Balance, Jan. 10, 1901 29506 

$1,279 91 

Cr. 

Rent of i-ooms to Dec. i, 1901 $-39 5S 

Janitoi-. scr\ ice 24 00 

S. S. Liirxey, nuisic i.S 00 

A. Schlehuber, catering 65 59 

William Miller & Son, florists S 00 

Howard Mudge Newhall, jiostage and postals 4S 35 

En\elopes and postage stamps 13 60 

(j. H. & A. L. Nichols, printing ^3-5 

Thomas P. Nichols, annual registers. 1000 278 00 

William S. Burrill, insurance 3 75 

Lynn Gas and Electric Co 11 88 

William S. Burrill, supplies 4 70 

S. S. Pierce & Co., tea i 00 

Joseph Young, groceries i 45 

Sinuii\v expenses i 25 

John S. Wright, linishing table 2 00 

Police, June 17 200 

Estate of E. H.Johnson, use of chairs, June 17 ... . 1300 

George C. Herbert, envelopes i 00 

George A. Higgins, carriage hire, [une 17 4 20 

Aiiioiiiil carried for-jjanh $79^ ^'^ 



24 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Aiiioiiiit brought for-i.vard^ $79860 

Clcriciil .serxice for year 1901 3 00 

Ezra D. Hines, lecture- 5 "o 

Boston and Northern R. R.. cars. Oct. 19 1600 

W. E. Parker, library bureau . ' 26 00 

Adams, Gushing &; Foster 3 03 

Hatch & Fernald, cases and labor 60 70 

Anthony Earle, stock and labor in new rooms 48 77 

J. L. Fairbanks, register 6 50 

C. T. Curtis ^: Son. mo\ ing furniture 8 00 

$975 ^'O 

Lynn Institution for Savings ' $10000 

Balance Central National Bank 1S5 39 

Cash on hanti 18 92 

304 31 

$1.27991 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



The undersigned having been appointed to audit the ac- 
counts of Eugene A. Putnam, Treasurer, hereby report that they 
have examined the accounts and vouchers as presented to them, 
and they appear to be correct. 

Nathan M. Hawkes, 
J. Warren Carsweli., 

h,YfiK. J(n/U(/r\' S. igo2. Auditors. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give ami bequeath to the Lynn Historical Society the S7im of 

. Dollars. 



LYNX HISTORICAL S0CII':TY 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GENEAEOGY. 



25 



The Committee on Genealogy has made an earnest 
endeavor to add to the number of family records now in 
the possession of the Society. Our list of genealogies has 
increased to 113, but as these are the contributions of but 
53 members, it will be seen that a large amount of work 
must be done before we can record a full set, in which 
each family connected with the Historical Society will tind 
a place. One meeting of the Society during the year was 
devoted to Genealog}', a paper being read and an inter- 
esting discussion had upon the subject. The members of 
the Committee have put forth earnest efforts to interest the 
Society, and have always been ready to assist those not 
familiar with the work of tracing family lines, and ready 
to render further help. 

A year ago it was announced as the purpose of the 
committee to bind the manuscript genealogies into a book, 
but that has been found impracticable, and the records will 
be preserved in the form in which they have been prepared. 
The genealogies are numbered in the order in which they 
are received, and additional records from the same mem- 
ber retain the original number with an added letter, as, for 
example. No. 53, a, b, c, and so on. One member has 
contributed eight genealogies, tracing her descent from as 
many emigrant ancestors. This illustrates the possibilities 
of this branch of work of the Society, and should encour- 
age all to at least attempt the preparation of one. 

The Committee meets on the first Monday evening of 
each month, when any information that is desired will be 



26 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

willingly given, and we cordially invite the members to 
avail themselves of the opportunity for assistance in trac- 
ing their family lines. Grateful acknowledgment is made 
to all who have responded to the requests of tlie Committee 
to add to its treasures. 

For the Committee, 

John L. Parker, 

l^\y:yi. Jtf///nrrv S, igo2 C//(iiiiii<u/ . 



RHPORT OF THH COMMITTHE ON PHOTOGRAPHY. 



George S. Bliss, Chairman of the Committee on 
Photography, made a verbal report that the Committee had 
made a large number of pictures during the past year and 
planned for a systematic ilkistration of the citv, which 
would comprise all the public buildings, and the prominent 
business structures. 



RHPORT OF THH COMMITTHH TO SHCURH PUBLICATON 
OF OLD TOWN RHCORDS. 



Hon. Nathan M. Hawices reported verbally what pro- 
gress had been made, and that a commencement of the 
work liad been made bv the City Clerk. 



RHPORT OF THH COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 
AND PRINTING. 



Howard Mudge Newhall, Chairman, reported ver- 
bally what had been accomplished, and that the publica- 
tions and notices which had been received b\' the members 
of the Society was the report of the work of the Committee. 




CHARLES COFFIN FRY. 



I 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIKTY. 27 



NECROLOGIES. 



CHARLES COFFIN FRY 

Son of Homer and Patience (Boyce) Fry, born on Tremont 
street, Lynn, May 31, 1842, died at his home on Laighlon 
street in this city, March 21, 1901. 

Mr. Fry inherited the traits of a stnrdy New England 
ancestry. WilHam Fry and his wife Hannah were mem- 
bers of the Dover, N. H., Society of Friends at the time of 
the birth of their son WilHam, 7th day, 12th mo. 1694, who 
married in 1724, Abigail, daughter of Ebenezer and Mary 
(Otis) Varney. They removed to Kittery, Maine, where 
on the nth day, 12th mo. 1731-2, their son John was 
born. He married June 21, 1762, "Merriam," daughter of 
Obadiah and Eleanor Wheeler of Bolton, Mass., and on 
September 21, 1773, their son John was born. John mar- 
ried June 6, 1798, Lydia, daughter of Robert and Sarah 
(Hunt) Earle of Leicester, Mass. Their son Homer born 
October 22, 1801, married October 12, 1832, Patience, 
daughter of Jonathan Boyce'' of Danvers (Jonathan, ■'' 
Jonathan,"* Jonathan,'^ Joseph,- Joseph*) and Anna J^reed. 

Mr. Fry was descended from two of the early I^\ im 
settlers ; on his father's side from Thomas Newhall through 
Mary Newhall, who married Robert Earle, and on his 
mother's side from Allen Breed through Anna Breed'' 
(Samuel,''' Ebenezer,^ Samuel,-' Allen,- Allen*). 

Even as a boy Mr. Fry was noted for thoroughness 
and self-reliant energ}', and to those traits his life suc- 
cess was largely due. He received his early education in 
the public schools of Lvnn, entering the High Scliool in 



28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIKTY. 

the class of 1855, when but thirteen years of age. After 
he was graduated he engaged in the shoe business in his 
father's factory on Market street, and in September, 1862, 
when but a few months over twenty years of age, he en- 
listed among the nine months men of the Eighth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M., serving as Corporal under General 
John C. Foster, in the Department of North Carolina, and 
later with the Army of the Potomac in Maryland, until 
after the expiration of his time of service in 1863. After 
the war he served as First Lieutenant of Company I, Eighth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M.,from 1865 to 1874; '^s Ad- 
jutant of said regiment from 1874 ^o 1875 ; as Major of the 
Seventh Battalion Infantry, M. V. M., 1876, 1877 and 1878 ; 
as Adjutant of the Eighth Regiment in 1879, 1880 and 
1881, and as Assistant Adjutant-General of the Second 
Brigade, M. V. M., from 1882 to 1897. Upon his own 
application he was retired July 29, 1897, with the rank of 
Brigadier-General, after nearly thirty-five years of military 
service, including his war service in 1862 and 1863. 

From 1873 to 1875, he in compan}^ with his brother 
James Boyce Fry, manufactured shoes on Exchange street. 
In 1876 he was elected City Auditor, and in 1877, City 
Marshal, a position he held two years. In 1879, ^^^ spent 
the summer in Europe, and in 1880, was elected clerk 
and treasurer of the Lynn Gas Light Company, and later 
that of the Lynn Gas and Electric Company, which he 
held until his decease. 

In addition to his business duties Mr. Fry was called 
to fill many positions of honor and trust, and this he did 
with unswerving fidelity and indefatigable energy, as he 
believed and acted upon his belief, that the best citizenship 
involved an active participation in public affairs. He ex- 
erted a strong influence in political matters as a member of 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 29 

the City Government from 1896 to 1901. As President of 
the Common Council, 1897-1898, he was a Trustee of the 
Pul^lic Library, and member of the School Committee. A 
member of the Board of Aldermen, 1899, 1900, 1901, being 
President of the Board in 1901. 

He was a prominent Mason and had held the following 
positions : Master of Mount Carmel Lodge, 1876-1877 ; 
Eminent Commander of Olivet Commandery, 1882-1883 ; 
Riijht Eminent Grand Commander of the Grand Command- 
ery of Knights Templars of Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, 1893-1894. He was President of the Massachusetts 
Union of Knights Templars Commanders in 1896-1897. He 
was long a miCmber of Mount Carmel Lodge, Sutton Chap- 
ter, Zebulon Council, Olivet Commandery; Boston Lafay- 
ette Lodfje of Perfection ; Giles F. Yates Council, Princes 
of Jerusalem ; Mt. Olivet Chapter, Rose Croix, Massachu- 
setts Consistory ; Aleppo Temple, Mystic Shrine ; a prom- 
inent member of the Grand Commandery of Knights 
Templars of Massachusetts and Rhode Island and the 
Grand Encampment of the United States, and an honorary 
member of the Mt. Supreme Council, Northern Masonic 
Jurisdiction, 33d degree. He was a member of General 
Lander Post 5, G. A. R., of the Park and Oxford Clubs, 
President of the Park Club, 1892, 1893, 1894 ; and a mem- 
ber of the Lynn Historical Society. 

Mr. Fiy was of a positive and forceful temperament, and 
possessed genuine qualities of organization and leadership. 
Independent in thought and action himself, he fully con- 
ceded the same independence to others. Tliose who knew 
him best were impressed with the justice, moderation, and 
charity of his personal judgments. He was a sincere 
friend, and always had a willing ear and a sympathetic 
heart for those in need or sorrow. "He was a leader 



30 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

among men, not by reason of self-assertion, but by the 
force of his character, the genuineness of his manhood, 
the dignity of his Hfe, and the unselfishness of his pur- 
poses." 



JOSEPH GOOLD BROWN 

Was born in Pembroke, Plymouth County, Mass., June 
19, 1835, and died in Lynn, Mass., May 27, 1901. He 
was the eldest son of Samuel Brown, a direct descendant 
of Chad Browne, who came to this country from England 
in 1638, and settled in Providence, R. I. Chad Browne 
was a Baptist minister and one of the chief men in the 
colony founded by Roger Williams, his name being the 
first of thirty-nine signatures to the Charter for the Rhode 
Island plantation, obtained from the King of England. 

Joseph G. Brown's mother was Maria Hussey of Nan- 
tucket, who was a descendant, in the seventh generation, of 
Tristram Coffin, one of the first proprietors of that island, 
and its governor in 167 1. Mr. Brown's parents were 
Qiiakers, of which society he remained a life-long member, 
being a constant attendant at its services, and holding the 
office of Treasurer of the Lynn Meeting until within a few 
months of his death, when his failing health obliged him 
to resign it. 

As was usual with the men of iiis ijeneration, he 
received the greater part of his education at the district 
school in his own town, but it was supplemented by a 
course at the Eriends' School, in Providence, R. L 

After leaving school, like most young men, he felt 
that his energies demanded wider scope than was offered 
him on his father's farm, and he went to Wilmington, 
Delaware, where he entered into the hardware business. 




JOSEPH GOOLD BROWN. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 3I 

He gave it up, however, in 1862, and came to Lvnn to 
engage in the manufacturing of shoes with his brother, 
William x\ustin Brown, under the firm name of Brown 
Brothers. Afterwards, and until the great fire of 1889, ^^^ 
conducted a large shoe business himself on the site of the 
present Brown building, which he erected after the de- 
struction by that fire of a former one built by his brother 
and himself. 

In politics, Mr. Brown was a staunch Re])ublican and 
was elected by that party, in the years 1896 and 1897, to 
represent Wards Two and Four and Nahant in the State 
Legislature. During his first term, he was a member of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Printing ; and the follow- 
ing ^'ear he was House Chairman of that Committee and 
also a member of the Committee on Lie[uor Laws. 

In 1898, he served the city as an Alderman from 
Ward Four and was twice re-elected. 

In both of these public offices, Mr. Brown displayed his 
uncompromising fidelitv to what he believed to be for the 
good of the people, and his successive elections to the 
Le<;islature and Citv Council indicate the esteem in which 
he was held by his fellow citizens. 

For many years, and up to the time of his death, he was 
one of the Trustees of the Nathan Breed estate of Lynn, 
the duties of which office he performed with faithfulness 
and exactness to the last. 

Mr. Brown w^as a member of the Lynn Historical 
Societv, and was alwavs deeply interested in everything 
connected with the welfare of the city of his adoption. 

^ In 1854, ^^^ married Katherine Murray Bostwick of 
New York, who survives him. 

Five children, all of whom are living, were the fruit 
of their union, namelv : Maria B. Woodbury, Laura L. 



32 LYNN IIIS'IOKICAL SOCIETY. 

Sprague, Cora E. Hilton, Mary Emma Hallett, and 
Bethany S. Brown. 



ANNA MARIA (WARREN) SYMONDS 

Was born in L^nn, August 17, 1843, the second child of 
Asa and Cynthia P. (Breed) Warren. On the paternal 
side, she was in the seventli generation from James Warren 
who settled at Kittery, Maine, in 1636, and on the mater- 
nal side, the ninth generation from Allen Breed and thus 
was connected in greater or less degree with nearly all 
the old Lynn families. 

Her childhood was passed in this city in the little 
house on Nahant street, once standing on ground now 
owned and occupied as a home by Benjamin N. Johnson. 
When ten years old, her father's health necessitated a re- 
moyal from Lynn, and he undertook the management of 
a branch of the shoe business of S. M. Bubier (with whom 
he had occupied a position in Lynn), at Naples, Maine. 
Here, on the shore of Long Lake, the family liyed for six 
years, and here occurred the fire in which the father and 
one brother lost their liyes. The home thus sadly broken 
up, the remaining members of the family returned to Lynn 
to spend the remaining years, and took up their residence 
in the house next their former home on Nahant street. In 
1870 the subject of this sketch w^as married to Walter E. 
Symonds (son of Stillman Lothrop and Oliye Gould 
(Lovell) Symonds), at that time a member of the firm of 
B. F. Doak & Co., and now successor of D. H. Sweetser 
as Treasurer of the Lynn Institution for Sayings. Two 
years later they moved to the house on Nahant street, where 
they haye since resided and there Mrs. Symonds died, July 
19, 1901, after an illness starting with a slight cold in 




AX.XA .UAA'/.l (WAKRKX) SYMOXns. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



33 



April, and gradually showing itself of a serious and then 
of a fatal character. 

Mrs. Symonds was a woman of sweet and loving 
nature, active in all good works ; has endeared herself to a 
wide circle of friends who mourn her loss, as the societies 
of which she was a member miss her ever ready and effi- 
cient help. She was a member of the Historical Society, 
one of the th'st and most constant members of the North 
Shore Club ; was thoroughly identified with the work of 
the First Universalist Church, in all its branches, and was 
always especially interested and an active participant in 
many charitable and philanthropic works. The family, to 
whom comes so great a loss, consists of her husband, two 
children, Anna Louise (Mrs. Charles A. Collins), and 
Warren Lovell, and a sister, Mary A. Warren. 

"I cannot say, and I will not say 
That she is dead. She is just awaj. 

With a cheery smile, and a \ya\e of the hand, 
She has wandered into an unknown land. 

And left us dreaming ho\y yery fair 

It needs must be. since she lingers there." 



34 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



THE ESTABLISHED CHURCH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

A papur ixad bufoiv Un- I.yriii 1 1 istiiik-al Sock-ly I>v 
lli,Nr<v T. I.umjMls, Esq,. 



In the history of the struggle between the Puritans and the 
various opposing sects which grew up among them — a struggle 
which continued well into the nineteenth century, until it ended 
in the final divorce of church and State and the establishment of 
that measure of religious freedom which we enjoy to-day — no 
descendant of the early Massachusetts settlei"s can fail to be 
interested. Congregationalists, whose faith was formerly the 
established religion of Massachusetts — Baptists and Qiiakers, 
Unitarians and Universalists, whose predecessors rebelled with 
ultimate success against the supremacy of that established 
religion — all unite, at the present time, in the endeavor to learn 
the truth concerning the two centuries of religious warfare 
through which this Commonwealth has passed. 

That the principal reason for the Puritan emigration to 
Massachusetts was the desire to escape the persecutions of the 
Anglican prelates, is familiar to every one. The religious zeal, 
courage, and fortitude of the Puritans have commanded the 
admiration of the world ; but those very qualities, when given 
full sway in the wilds of New England, led to the establishment 
of a despotism as mibearable as that from which they had 
escaped. 

It is a sad reflection upon human nature, that in the history 
of the world, until the present age, no religious sect has been 
able to refrain from persecution when it has had the power ; and 
a little thought may perhaps lead to the conclusion that the 
spirit of religious oppression is not quite dead yet. The Jews 
and the Romans persecuted the early Christians ; the Christians, 
then formed into the Roman Catholic Church, inflicted the 
terrors of the Inquisition upon the Protestants ; the Church of 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



35 



England, becoming the dominant sect of English Protestants, in 
turn harassed the Puritans; the Puritans, coming to New Eng- 
land, took their i-evenge upon the Baptists and Qiiakers ; while 
the Baptists and (Quakers, for all we know, failed to become 
active persecutors merely from want of opportunity. 

The Puritans valued their religion so highly, that they 
determined to prevent any other sect from gaining a foothold in 
Massachusetts. In the Colony Laws we find this provision, first 
enacted in 163 1 — " To the end the body of the freemen may be 
preserved of honest and good men, It is Ordered, That hence- 
forth no man shall be admitted to the freedome of this Common- 
wealth, but such as are members of some of the Churches, 
within the limits of this Jurisdiction." This was not amended 
until 1664, and even then no unorthodox person could be admit- 
ted to citizenship. 

Very early in the history of the Colony a strangely tolerant 
declaration was made. That remarkable code of laws called 
the Body of Liberties of 1641 contained this passage; "Wee 
allowe private meetings for edification in religion amongst 
Christians of all sortes of people. So it be without just offence 
for number, time, place or other circumstances." But our Puri- 
tan ancestors reserved the privilege of giving a broad and liberal 
interpretation to the words "just offence"; and a congregation 
of unorthodox persons, who presumed to rely upon the words of 
the Body of Liberties, would probably have been told that 
accursed heretics were never intended to be benefited by the 
language of that act. In fact, the way in which the Puritans 
justified their persecutions was by representing all unorthodox 
persons as heretics and disciples of the devil, and therefore not 
entitled to toleration. One of the early statutes, passed in 
1644-46, declared that " Although no humane Power, be Lord 
over the Faith & Consciences of men, yet because such as bring 
in damnable Heresies, tending to the subversion of the Christian 
Faith & distructions of the soules of men, ought duely to be 
restrained, from such notorious impieties. It is therefore 
Ordered," that those who broach and maintain "any Damnable 



36 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Heresies," such as denying the immortality of the soul, the resur- 
rection of the body, original sin, the atonement, the fourth com- 
mandment, or the baptism of infants, shall be banished. To 
deny any of the books of the Bible to be the " written & infalible 
Word of God," was, in 165 1, made punishable by fine or whip- 
ping, and, for a second offence, by death. What an exodus 
there would be if these old laws should be revived to-day ! 

In 1646, Samuel Maverick of Boston, a member of the 
Church of England, with a few others, petitioned the General 
Court, asking for civil rights for Episcopalians, and praying that 
" none of the English nation *** be banished unlesse they break 
the known lawes of England." A storm of denunciation arose 
from the clergy, and the result was that the petitioners were fined 
for persisting " obstinately and proudly in their evil practice" — 
that is to say, for maintaining the right of petition and the justice 
of their request. 

The Antinomians were the first sect to give trouble to the 
Puritans. In 1634, Mrs. Anne Hutchinson arrived in Boston. 
She was a woman of great ability and high character, and won 
many friends, but fell under the displeasure of the ministers, who 
accused her of advocating the doctrine that one could be saved 
by faith without good works, and that nothing which a believer 
might do could be sin. Although it is very doubtful whether 
her statements, except by a forced construction, supported that 
doctrine, she was nevertheless condemned and banished, and her 
adherents suppressed. 

The Antinomian controversy had hardly been settled, before 
the Baptists began to give orthodox^ people great anxiety. The 
Baptists, in early Colonial days, figured under the formidable 
names of Anabaptists and Antipaedobaptists. Roger Williams, 
a minister in Salem, who was banished to Rhode Island in 1636 
because of his unpopular opinions, is commonly said to have 
been the leader of the Baptists in America. But it has been 
doubted by some historians whether his opinions were really those 
of the later Baptist church. 

1 This word is used, of course, in its popuhu' or historic;il sense. 



LYNN HISTORICAL S0CI]<:TY. 37 

As early as 1644, the Baptists had become worthy of the 
attention of the General Court, which passed a law condemning 
them to banishment if they declared their faith. This, however, 
did not prevent the spread of the belief. Indeed, the first presi- 
dent of Harvard College, Henry Dunster, was removed from 
his office because of his disapproval of infant baptism. 

In Swampscott, then a part of Lynn, lived William Witter, 
an ao-ed Baptist, who had long been harassed on account of his 
religious views. Being old and blind, he requested the Baptists 
in Rhode Island to send some of the brethren to him, to admin- 
ister the communion. John Clark and two others came in re- 
sponse to his request. They were at Witter's home on Sunday, 
July 20, 165 1, and, with a few friends, held a private service. 
While Mr. Clark was preaching, two constables entered and 
arrested them. In the afternoon, the constables took the pris- 
oners to the Puritan meeting, where they had the pleasure of 
listening to the preaching of Thomas Cobbet, the author of a 
tract entitled, "A large, nervous, golden, conscientious dis- 
course, against the Baptists." One might think that a sufficient 
punishment, but on the 31st they were brought before Governor 
Endicott for trial. A trial before Governor Endicott could have 
• but one ending. Although the only penalty provided by statute 
for the offense of being a Baptist was banishment, two of them 
were fined, and one, Obadiah Holmes, was given thirty lashes 
with a three-thonged whip. 

Although the Baptists were suppressed for a while, they 
gained strength so rapidly that the time soon came when they 
had to be tolerated. By 1678 they felt strong enough to build a 
meeting-house in Boston ; and from that time we hear no more 
of conflict with the Baptists. 

Turning back a few years, we come to the persecution of 
the Qiiakers — the darkest stain upon the annals of the Puritan 
Commonwealth, not excepting even the Witchcraft delusion. 
The witches were accused of making a covenant with the devil ; 
if such a covenant had been possible, and if they had been guilty, 
they would have deserved their fate. But, granting all which 



38 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

has been said against the Qiiakers, there is no excuse for the 
treatment to which they were subjected. 

In July, 1656, the magistrates were thrown into a great 
panic by the arrival of two poor Quaker women in Boston. 
Shortly afterwards, a law was passed against the " cursed sect of 
the (Quakers," condemning them to banishment, with a promise 
of death if they dared to return. Nevertheless, the Qiiakers 
appear to have gained a number of converts. It has been as- 
serted by some writers, and denied by others, that the early 
Qiiakers were coarse, blustering, disagreeable fanatics. But 
whether that charge is true or not, there can be no doubt of their 
courage. Before 1661, four Qiiakers were hanged, and many 
imprisoned, scourged, and banished. Among those hanged was 
one woman, Mary Dyer, who had once before been condemned 
to death, but had escaped it by consenting to go to Rhode Island. 
Ashamed of what she considered her cowardice, she returned to 
Massachusetts to proclaim her faith, and met death on the gal- 
lows without fear. 

It may seem strange, that, with the exception of certain laws 
to prevent Jesuit priests from working among the Indians on the 
frontier, no statutes were passed concerning Roman Catholics. But 
the absence of any laws against Papists within the settled towns 
is easily accounted for ; the idea was too awful to contemplate. 

The conduct of the Colony of Massachusetts in persecuting 
members of dissenting sects did not meet with the approval of the 
English authorities ; and further persecution was forbidden by 
the Province Charter of William and Mary, in 1 691, in these 
words, — "Wee doe by these presents *** Grant Establish and 
Ordaine that forever hereafter there shall be a liberty of Con- 
science allowed in the Worshipp of God to all Christians (ex- 
cept Papists) Inhabiting or which shall Inhabit or be Resident 
within our said Province or Territory." 

It is a relief to turn from such sanguinary conflicts as those 
which have been described, to one which involved no bodily 
harm, although it was quite as fiercely contended. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



39 



To be taxed for the support of another's religion is ahnost 
as hard as to be prevented from maintaining one's own. Having 
secured the right to worship at their own churches, the Bap- 
tists, Quakers, Episcopalians, and other dissenters began to 
strive for exemption from the duty of supporting Congrega- 
tionalism. 

In order to understand this struggle, and its successful termin- 
ation, we must understand the system ujoon which the churches 
and parishes of Massachusetts were founded. 

In the earliest records of the Colony, in 1630, is the follow- 
ing entry : "Imprimis, it was propounded how the ministers 
should be maintained." It was decided to maintain them at the 
public expense. 

It is true that such legislation did not create a union of 
church and State, such as existed in the Papal States in Italy ; 
but it did place Orthodox Congregationalism upon the footing of 
an established religion, which it was the special function of the 
government to foster. 

Except in Boston, where the system of voluntary offering 
prevailed, every inhabitant was taxed his share for the support of 
the ministry. Any town which failed to collect such taxes and 
to support a " learned, orthodox" minister, was liable to punish- 
ment.^ 

It cannot be said that these enactments were not subject to 
contemporary criticism. ■ In 1658, at Plymouth court. Lieuten- 
ant Mathew Fuller was fined forty shillings for saying, "All 
such laws are wicked and devilish laws, and the Devil sat at the 
stern when they were enacted." And Governor Winthrop, in 
his diary, relates that the system of taxation " was very offensive 
to some." 

As we have seen, every town was given the right and duty 
to maintain divine worship within its borders. Business relating 
to ministers and meeting-houses was transacted in town-meeting, 
and was not distinguished from matters of merely municipal 

• St. 1692.3, c. 26; St. 1692-3, c. 46; St. 1701-3, c. 10; St. 1706-7, c. 9; St. 1715-16, c. 17; St. 
I799> '^- S7, § 2; Com. V. W'iitcrborough, 5 Mass. 257. 



4© LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

concern.' The town in those early days, had two sets of func- 
tions — the one, municipal, the other, parochial. - 

As the towns grew larger, it became impracticable for all 
the people to worship in one meeting-house. In such cases, a 
part of the town would be set off by the General Court as a sep- 
arate parish. If a certain portion of the territory of the town 
was thus set off, it was called a territorial parish. If the new 
parish was formed of certain designated individuals, it was 
called a poll parish. In either case, the result to the town was 
the same.^ The town could not continue to maintain public 
worship for a part only of its inhabitants. For this reason, 
immediately upon the formation of a parish within a town, the 
remainder of the inhabitants and territory', not included in the 
new parish, became, by operation of law, the first parish. ■* The 
town was no longer bound to maintain public worship, but that 
duty fell upon the parishes. All property which the town had 
owned in its parochial capacity became the property of the first 
parish.'' 

In a very interesting paper which Hon. Nathan Mortimer 
Hawkes read before this Society, he mentioned the attempt on the 
part of the town of Lynn, in iSo6, to use the meeting-house of 
the First Parish as a place for town-meetings, even after the for- 
mation of other parishes in Lynn. The question of the right of 
a town to do this, was brought before the Supreme Court in the 
case of the town of Medford, in 1836, and decided in favor of 
the parish and against the town.'' 

As the towns became divided into parishes, the latter took 

' Austin V. Thomas, 14 Mass. 333, 33S; Tobey v. Wareham Bank, 13 Met. -fjo, 44'!: 
Fisher v. Whitman, 13 Pick. 350, 355. Of. Jewett v. Burrouyhs. 15 Mass. 464. 4'^S. 

- Ludlow V. .Sikfs, 19 Pick. 317; Atty. Gen. v. Proiirictors, 3 Orav, i. 35; Weld \. Mav. 

9 Gush. iSi, iSS. 

^ Minot V. Curtis, 7 Mass. 441 ; Sutton Parish v. Cole, S Mass. 96. 

■• St. 171S-19, c. i; St. 17S6, c. 10, § 5; Brunswick Parish v. Dunning, 7 Mass. 445: Med- 
ford Parish v. Pratt, 4 Pick. 222, 227; I.udlow v. Sikes, 19 Pick. 317; Medfurd Parish v. 
Medford, 21 Pick. 199, 204. 

■'' Tobey V. Wareham Bank, 13 Met. 440; Sudbury Parish v. Jones, S Cush. 1S4; Med- 
ford Parish v. Medford, 21 Pick. 199; Stearns v. Woodbury, 10 Met. 27; Wells v. Heath, 

10 (iray, 17, 24. 

" Medford Parish v. Pratt, 4 Pick. 222. See also, Milford v. Godfrey, i Pick. 91 ; Gofl' 
V. Uchoboth, 12 Met, 26, 



LYNN HISTORICAL SiOCIRTY. 



41 



upon themselves all parochial duties. They became corporations 
empowered to build and manage meeting-houses, to settle and 
maintain ministers, and to tax their members for the defraying 
of all necessary parish charges.^ 

The question is likely to suggest itself, If the parish was the 
body which had the management of all the business affairs, what 
were the powers of the church? The answer is in the words of 
Chief Justice Shaw : " The church is a voluntary association, 
consisting of the whole or some part of the members of the 
society [which is another name for a parish], united together by 
covenant or agreement, according to usages well known and 
generally recognized, for the purpose mainly of celebrating the 
Christian ordinance of the Lord's Supper, and for mutual dis- 
cipline, in regular church order. The church is a voluntary 
association ; not a corporation."^ 

It is evident that the temporal powers of the church were 
few. The church had not even the right of choosing the minis- 
ter. The earliest usage was, it is true, for the church to elect 
the minister ; and this usage was declared in the Body of Liber- 
ties of 1641. But by St. 1693-3, c. 36 and st. 1693-3, c. 46, the 
consent of the town or parish was required ; and by the Con- 
stitution of Massachusetts, which was adopted in 1780, the right 
of choosing the minister was given wholly to the town or parish.^ 

In their membership, the church and the parish differed as 
widely as in their powers. The church was necessarily a body 
of professed Orthodox Christians. No others could be received. 
On the other hand, the very origin of the parish gave it a varied 

1 Constitution of Mass., Anifiulnicnt XI; Rev. Laws. c. 36, § 17. But llic rig-ht of a 
religious society to tax its menibeis was taken away by st. 1887,0.419; Rev. Laws, c. 36, 
§ iS. On the power of a parish to maiiilain schools, see White v. Braintree Parish, 13 Met. 
506. 

■^ Parker v. May. 5 Cush. 336, 345. See also. Weld v. May, 9 Cush. iSl. 

"■Avery v. Tyringham, 3 Mass. ifw, 180; Baker v. I'ales. 16 Mass. 4SS, 5aS; Burr v. 
Sandwich Parish, 9 Mass. 277, 397, 29S; Leicester v. Fitchlnui;. 7 Allen, 90, 92. Cf. a New 
Hampshire case, Holt v. Downs, sS N. II. 170. If, in the election of a minister, no pro- 
vision is made for a termination of the relation, the election is for life, unless the mini-ster 
commits some violation of dulv. Avery v. Tyringham, 3 Mas.s. 160; Sheldon v. Easton 
Parish, 24 Pick. 2S1. See also. Freeman v. Bourne, 170 Mass. 2S9; Cochran v. Camden, 15 
Mas.s. 296; Thompson V. Rehoboth, 7 Pick. 160; Whitmore v. Plymouth Society, 2 Gray, 
306. 



42 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



composition. Originally all the freemen of the town took part in 
the discussion of parochial affairs in town-meeting. When the 
towns became divided into parishes, the membership was no less 
general. All the voters living within the confines of a territorial 
parish were members of it. The parish could not exclude any 
one of them, nor could any one escape from membership. The 
maintenance of religion being one of the functions of govern- 
ment, a parish was as much a public corporation as a town, and 
had the same general membership.^ As the right of suffrage 
became extended so as to include unorthodox persons, the views 
of the members became correspondingly varied. But the Puritan 
spirit was so strong in Massachusetts, that until the beginning of 
the nineteenth century the majority in almost all the towns and 
parishes were in full sympathy with the Orthodox creed. 

Membership in a parish was by no means an unmixed l)less- 
ing. It meant parish taxes and charges, and, unless these were 
paid, levies, sales of property, and imprisonment for debt. In 
fact, all persons having property within the limits of the parish 
were taxed. Even non-residents and manufacturing corporations 
were compelled to bear their share of the burden of supporting 
an "able, learned orthodox " ministry. - 

The strongest objection to the ecclesiastical taxes came, as 
might be expected, from the Baptists, Qiiakers, and other dis- 
senters. The first exemption which any unorthodox persons 
obtained was granted by the act of 1727-3S, c. 7, which pro- 
vided that the taxes paid by Episcopalians should be given to the 
minister of that denomination, if such a minister lived in the 
neighborhood. The next year. Baptists and Qiiakers were, by 
statute, exempted from taxation. These acts of exemption were, 
by their terms, limited in their effect to a few years ; but success- 
ive acts continued the exemption almost to the close of the eigh- 
teenth century. The persons exempted by these statutes were not 
allowed to vote on religious matters in town or parish meetings. 

1 Oakes v. Hill, lo Pick. 333; Kcitli v. IIowuivl, 24 Pick. 292; Fisher v. Wliiliium, 13 
Pick. 350, 355; Richardson v. Butterfickl, 6 Cush. 191. 

- Goodell Mfg. Co. v. Trask, 1 1 Pick. 514 ; Amcslnnv Nail Co. v. Weed, 17 Mass. 53 ; 
Coburn v. Ilichardson, 16 Mass. 213. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



43 



It is plain that so far the dissenters had obtained but a limit- 
ed relief. Episcopalians, Baptists and Qiiakers were the only 
denominations benefited. The dissenters were naturally not con- 
tent witli this state of the law, and procured the enactment of the 
statute of 1799, c. 87, which was founded on the Declaration of 
Rights, Article III. This act provided that all persons, except 
Qiiakers, should pay an ecclesiastical tax, but that every person, 
of whatever religious belief, should have the right to have his 
parish taxes " applied to the support of the public teacher of his 
own religious sect or denomination." The dissenters, except the 
Qiiakers, were not deprived of their parish membership. The 
parish still had the right to tax them, although it became the 
duty of the parish treasurer to pay the money collected over to 
the dissenting minister. The parish treasurer was sometimes 
obstinate, and not inclined to increase the revenues of the dis- 
senting clergy. It required in one instance fourteen suits at law 
before the parish treasurer could be compelled to do his duty, 
and, in another case, an expense of one hundred dollars and 
four years time to get four dollars out of his hands for the use 
of a Baptist minister. 

The vSupreme Court construed the act of 1799 very strictly. 
The Methodists were alarmed by the decision that their itinerant 
preachers, who rode the circuit, preaching in a number of towns 
in succession, were not within the meaning of the statute.' 
Furthermore, it was held that the dissenting minister, in order 
to be entitled to the taxes, must be settled over an incorporated 
religious society;^ and very few of the dissenting societies were 
incorporated. 

Both these points were rectified by the statute of iSii, c. 6, 
which actually went so far as to provide that a person could 
withdraw from the parish, and, by joining some other religious 
society, escape taxation in the original parish. The Supreme 
Court gave a reluctant consent to its constitutionality, saying with 



1 Washburn v. West Spiiiiotidil I'aiisli, i Muss. 52; Tumor v. nrooktiold Precinct, 7 
Mass. 60. 

- Barnes v. Falmouth I'arisli, 6 Mass. 401. 



44 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

considerable despondency, that it might become injurious to 
" public morals and religion," and tend " to destroy all the 
decency and regularity of public worship." At the present 
time, we should be more likely to consider the statute of 1811 
unconstitutional because it compelled a man to subm.it of taxation 
in some one religious society, and denied him the right now well 
known and often exercised, to have no church associations. It 
is a striking indication of Orthodox sentiment at that time, that 
it was seriously contended by counsel that the Legislature had 
no right to grant exemptions from taxation for the support of the 
established religion. As we have seen, the court, while holding 
the statute constitutional, expressed a decided opinion against 
the policy of an enactment " so destructive to regular and orderly 
worship." ^ 

The attitude of the Supreme Court at that time was one of 
tender solicitude for the safety of the orthodox estal)lishment. 
In the case of Barnes- v. First Parish in Falmouth,- in iSio, 
Chief Justice Parsons made an elaborate defense of the Massa- 
chusetts ecclesiastical system. Chief Justice Doe of New Hamp- 
shire, in commenting upon the Falmouth case, rather humorously 
said, '' The decision in Barnes v. Falmouth is pervaded by a 
profound conviction of the wretchedness of man not assisted in 
the protection and enjoyment of life, liberty and property, and 
the acquisition of an inheritance in a better country, by religious 
corporations, legally authorized and required to exercise ample 
powers of taxation."'' 

Before passing to the account of the crisis in ecclesiastical 
history which preceded the disestablishment of Congregational- 
ism in Massachusetts, let us consider the state of religion after 
the passage of the statute of iSi i. 

First, there were the old territorial parishes, which, like 
towns, were bound to receive as members all who might reside 
within their territorial limits, and choose to partake of their cor- 

1 Ad;iiii.s V. ItdWf, 14 M;iss. 540. 

- 6 Muss. 401. 

" Holt V. Downs, 5S N. II. 170. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCU'rrY. 45 

porate privileges. Tiiese territorial parishes were all religious 
societies supporting the Orthodox Congregational faith. 

Then there were other religious societies or poll parishes, 
incoVporated and unincorporated, of Orthodox Congregational- 
ists, Baptists, Methodists, Episcopalians, Unitarians, Universal- 
ists, and other denominations, whose members, having withdrawn 
from the territorial parishes, were no longer taxable therein under 
the statute of iSi i. But there was no way in which a man could 
escape taxation in the territorial parish except by becoming a 
member of some other religious society. 

A case which occurred in Maiden is instructive in regard to 
the position of a territorial parish at that time. In Maiden there 
were three different religious societies or poll parishes, composed 
respectively of Baptists, Methodists, and Congregationalists. 
Besides these, there was the territorial parish, comprising the 
whole town, which, upon the organization of poll parishes with- 
in its borders, had become known as the First Parish. Capt. 
Uriah Oakes was a member of the Congregational poll parish. 
He obtained a certificate from the clerk of that poll parish that 
he had ceased to be a member, and, presenting that certificate at 
a meeting of the first Parish, claimed the right to vote as a mem- 
ber of the First Parish. The clerk of the First Parish refused to 
allow Capt. Oakes to vote. Upon a suit brought by the Captain, 
the court decided that upon leaving the poll parish, he became 
by that act a member of the territorial parish, and had the right 
to vote in its meetings.^ 

We have now come down to the time when the Orthodox 
faith was about to lose its character as an established religion. 
We might expect to find that result brought about by the clamors 
of the dissenting denominations for religious equality. But such 
was not the case. The dissenters were yet in the minority in the 
State. It needed a violent shock to convince the Congregation- 
alists that there was something wrong in the whole system before 
a radical change could be made. 

1 Oakes V. Mill, 10 Pick, t,^; 14 Pick. 442. Sit- also. Keith v. llowaid, .'4 Pick. 292. 



^6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The blow came from an unexpected quarter. For years the 
Supreme Court had worked hard for the support of the Orthodox 
church. Statutes in favor of dissenters had met with little en- 
couragement from the judiciary. Yet the downfall of the State 
church was due to a decision of the Supreme Court. As Mr. 
Buck, a writer upon this subject, says, "Under the Bill of 
Rights of 17S0, Congregationalists had slumbered, as under 
their own peculiar vine ; bearing unto them taxes and other good 
and religious fruits ; they deemed it was intended for the especial 
refreshment of Christians of the established order. Little did 
they dream, in those halcyon days of Commonwealth favor, that 
a freezing blast was soon to sweep over them, blowing out of 
the judicial quarter of the heavens, heretofore so bland and 
genial to the churches proper of the Commonwealth.'" 

The case arose in the town of Dedham. In the First 
Parish in Dedham, as in many other parishes in the Common- 
wealth, the Unitarian belief had been rapidly gaining ground. 
A majority of the parish had become converted to the new faith, 
although two-thirds of the church members had i-emained 
Orthodox. The usage of most parishes was to elect the minister 
by concurrent vote of the church and the parish ; but the First 
Parish of Dedham threw off all allegiance to the church, and 
exercised its constitutional rights by choosing a minister against 
the objection of the Orthodox majority of the church. Mr. 
Lamson, the minister chosen, was a Unitarian; a circumstance 
which the chvuxh considered as adding insult to injury. 

The Trinitarian majority of the church could not submit to 
this indignity. To make the matter worse, the parish, with its 
Unitarian minister, claimed all the property, and in fact used the 
meeting-house for religious services. There was no course open 
to the church but to dissolve its connection with the parish, 
which, by a vote, it proceeded to do. Pending a decision of the 
court as to the ownership of the property, the seceding church 
established itself across the street from Mr. Lamson's society, 
and claimed to be the true First Church in Dedham. 

■ Kcclcsiiisticiil Law (2d Ed.) 4S. 



LYNN HIST.ORICAI. SOCIETY 



47 



The minority of the church, which adhered to the parish, 
also claimed to be the rightful First Church in Dedham, and 
accordingly elected deacons. These deacons sued one of the 
deacons of the seceding Orthodox church in an action of 
replevin, to obtain the records and other property of the 
church. 

This case, under the name of Baker v. Fales,^ came before 
the Supreme Court in iSzo. While the suit was technically for 
the sole purpose of recovering certain personal property, it really 
involved the question whether the seceding Orthodox church had 
any rights in the meeting-house or any other part of the 
property. 

The case was argued for the defendant by Mr. Webster, 
with all the ability for which he was famed. Associated with 
him was Theron Metcalf, afterwards a Justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court. But the court decided for the plaintiff. It was 
held that, under the Constitution, the parish had the sole right of 
electing the minister. The parish was not bound to select a 
minister of the Orthodox faith, but might, if it desired a change 
of doctrine, choose a minister of any other belief to preside over 
the parish. As for the church, that was not a corporation, but 
a mere appendage to the parish. A church, apart from its parish, 
could have no legal existence. If all the members of a church 
should die or withdraw, it would be competent for other mem- 
bers of the parish to unite themselves into a church, which would 
be the legitimate successor of the former church, and would be 
the church of the parish. If, as in the case at bar, only a major- 
ity of the church members should secede, leaving a minority with 
the parish, the minority remaining would constitute the church. 
The deacons elected by the church members who I'emained asso- 
ciated with the parish, were therefore entitled to the church 
records. The meeting-house was the property of the parish, 
and even if the church could be said to have any rights in the 
building, surely the seceding church members had none, for, 
although they were a majority, they ceased to be the First 

1 i6 Mass. 4SS. 



48 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Church at the tune when they separated from the First Parish.^ 
Such was the decision which brought home to the Congre- 
gationaHsts the dangers of their parish system. By it the Ortho- 
dox First Church of Dedham was turned out of house and home 
for the benefit of the Unitarian First Parish. It is not difficult 
to understand the storm of protests which arose from Congrega- 
tionalists, both lawyers and laymen. In Stebbins v. Jennings, - 
commonly known as the Brookfield case, which came before the 
Supreme Court in 1830, the facts were much the same as those 
in the Dedham case ; in fact, only two church members remained 
with the parish. The counsel for the Orthodox church argued 
the case with fulness, in the endeavor to induce the court to over- 
rule Baker v. Fales. But Chief Justice Shaw, in giving the 
unanimous opinion of the court, sustained Baker v. Fales, and 
decided that the seceding church had no rights. 

The Unitarians and Universalists were not slow to take 
advantage of the law as laid down by the court. All that they 
had to do was to gain a majority in any parish, and they were 
supreme. In this, the nature of the old territorial parishes was 
a great aid. Under the statutes which we have already men- 
tioned, all the inhabitants, unless members of some other relig- 
ious society, were members of the territorial parish. Of these 
inhabitants, many were Unitarians and Universalists in belief, 
while others were indifferent in i-eligious matters, and naturally 
inclined towards the more libea*al denominations and against the 
established order of things. Even if the Unitarians and Univer- 
salists within the territorial parish were united into separate 
societies of their own, they could regain their membership in the 
territorial parish by ceasing to be members of any other society ; 
the prospect of acquiring a meeting-house, completely furnished, 
was a great inducement for them to do so. 

At many of the parish meetings, between 1820 and 1834, 

1 For these jiropositioiis, sue ;il.so Stebbcns v. Jennings, lo Pick. 172; Sawyer v. Bald- 
win, II Pick. 492; Page v. Crosby, 24 Pick. 211; Attorney General v. Proprietors, 3 Gray i, 
57; Warner v. Bowdoin Square Baptist Society, 14S Mass. 400. Cf. Holt v. Downs, 58 N. 
11. 170. 

- 10 Pick. 172. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



49 



more political strategy could be found than at the town-meetings. 
Some dissenting parish members, usually either Universalists or 
Unitarians, would seek to elect a minister of their belief, and to 
change the doctrines taught from the meeting-house pulpit. To 
effect this, the neighborhood would be canvassed, and all possible 
voters turned out. The Congregationalists would rally to save the 
meeting-house. At the parish meeting, the battle would be fouo-ht. 
In some parishes, a single vote turned the scale, and decided 
whether Congregationalism or some newer creed should prevail. 

Just how many parishes in Massachusetts went over to the 
dissenting denominations, I do not know ; but the number must 
have been large. It is now very common, in Massachusetts 
towns, to see, upon a meeting-house, the words, " First Congre- 
gational Church — Unitarian." One who is not familiar with 
the story of the Unitarian defection, sees the words, and passes 
by ; but to the student of Massachusetts history, these four words 
bring before the mind a vivid picture of seventy-five years ago. 
He sees the parish meeting, crowded with voters drawn together 
by the opposing factions. The question is put to a vote, and a 
bare majority suffices to elect a minister of Unitarian views. 
What is left for the Orthodox church members to do, but to 
leave their ancestral meeting-house to the invaders, and, by with- 
drawing, to seek to escape further humiliation? 

Congregationalists, even to-day, are apt to bemoan the loss 
of so many churches to the dissenting sects. Looking at the 
matter after the lapse of seventy-five years, I agree with them, 
that it would have been more fitting if a greater number of the 
historic churches of this Commonwealth had preserved their 
religious doctrines as well as their church and parish organiza- 
tions. But looking at the struggle from the standpoint of 
seventy-five years ago, the Unitarians and Universalists are 
hardly to be blamed for their exercise of the rights of a majority. 
For years they had been taxed for the support of the Orthodox 
ministry ; their money had been wrung from them for the 
building of Orthodox meeting-houses. Then, when they gained 
the upper hand, why should they not take possession of the 

4 



50 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

property for the maintenance of which they had been taxed ? 
The decision in the Dedham case seems to have been the 
real cause of the final divorce of church and State. The dis- 
senting denominations had long desired the equality of all sects 
before the law. The Congregationalists now began to see the 
dangers which lurked in the system of territorial parishes. For 
thirty years there had been continual litigation concerning relig- 
ious societies and ecclesiastical taxes. The reports of the 
Supreme Court early in this century abound in all kinds of suits 
ecclesiastical, of which the like cannot be found in the courts 
to-day. There were suits by parish treasurers to recover taxes ; 
suits by dissenters to recover damages for unlawfully levying on 
red heifers for parish taxes ; suits to compel parish treasurers to 
pay to the dissenting ministers the taxes collected from dis- 
senters ; and other actions too numerous to mention. All parties 
had by this time become tired of the old system, and when the 
Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution, which disestablished 
Congregationalism, was presented to the people in 1833, it was 
adopted by the very decisive vote of 32,234 to 3,273. The 
statute of 1834, c. 183, which followed, provided that a person 
might leave a parish at will, and that no one should thereafter 
be made a member of a parish without his consent in writing 
See Rev. Laws, c. 36, § 4. 

The act'of 1834 completed the woi-k of religious freedom. 
No longer could a person be compelled to submit to taxation for 
religious purposes. On the other hand, a person could no 
longer thrust himself into a religious society against its will. 
Territorial parishes became practically the same as poll parishes, 
for the rules governing their membership were made identical.^ 
The maintenance of religion ceased to be a function of govern- 
ment, and was left to private parishes or religious societies, sup- 
ported entirely by private liberality. By the same act, the old 
laws imposing fines for failure to attend public worship, were 
repealed. 

' Sudbury Parish v. Stearns, 21 Pick. 14S; Ludlow v. Sikes, 19 Pick. 317; Richardson v. 
Bultcrfield, 6 Cush. 19:, 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 5 1 

With the great changes made by the statute of 1S34, an 
account of the Established Church of Massachusetts ought per- 
haps to end ; but I cannot refrain from discussing briefly the 
condition of churclies and religious societies since the passage of 
that statute. 

The old distinctions between the church, and the parish — 
or, as it is more often called, the society, — still remain. The 
society is the legal corporation, owning the pi'operty, and having 
the sole right of electing the minister. The custom of electing 
the minister by concurrent vote of the church and the parish is 
simply a matter of courtesy. The society has the same right to 
change the doctrines taught in the meeting-house that it had in 
1S20. A Congregational society, if it pleases, may become Bap- 
tist, Universalist, Roman Catholic, or anything else, against the 
remonstrance of all the members of the church. All this is true 
not only of Congregational societies, but also of Unitarian, Uni- 
versalist, and Baptist societies, since they have all adopted the 
Congregational form of church government. The only safe- 
guard against a change of religion lies in the fact that few persons 
are likely to be admitted to membership unless they are in accord 
with the religious views which have been taught in the society. 

It is sometimes thought that the pewholders in a meeting- 
house have some control over the affairs of the society ; but this 
appears to be untrue.^ The right to a pew is merely a right to 
use a portion of the meeting-house, and involves no ownership 
in the soil, the building, or any of the furnishings." A pew- 
holder may be a member of the society, and in that capacity have 
a share in its management ; but a pewholder, as such, has merely 
the right to sit in his pew, and nothing more. 

But the right of the pewholder to the occupation of his pew 
is exclusive, and he can maintain an action of trespass for any 
infringement of his rights. How ungraciously the right to the 

1 In re New South Meeting-house in Boston, 13 Allen, 497, 508; Wood v. Cashing, 
6 Met. 448; Rev. Laws. c. 36, § 4. 

- Went\vorth v. Canton Parish, 3 Pick. 344; Locke v. Belmont Congregational Society, 
157 Mass. 589,594; Daniel v. Wood, i Pick. 102; Gay v. Baker, 17 Mass. 435; Revere v. 
Gannett, i Pick. i6y. 



52 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

exclusive use of a pew has been exercised, may be seen in a case 
which reached the Supreme Court, in which a pewholder, not 
wishing his pew to be used at a Fourth of July meeting, boarded 
it up.^ 

The society, being the general owner of the soil, has the 
right to alter or destroy the meeting-house or any of its furnish- 
ings. An indemnity must be given to the pewholders whose 
rights have been impaired ; but if the meeting-house is so old and 
ruinous that it is no longer tenantable no indemnity need be made, 
as the pewholders have lost nothing of value." The pewholders 
have no redress for the simple abandonment of the meeting-house 
by the society.^ 

We have now traced the history of the parish system down 
to the present day. In the last hundred years parishes have 
changed from municipal to purely priv^ate corporations. Within 
the twentieth century it is very likely that they will cease to exist. 
Already the Congregationalists, among whom there is now the 
greatest opposition to the parish system, have had a statute passed 
which permits the incorporation of churches, and provides for 
the transfer of the property from the society to the incorporated 
church, after which the society is supposed to pass out of 
existence.* When this statute is generally adopted, it will destroy 
the last vestige of that remarkable ecclesiastical system upon 
which was based the Established Church of Massachusetts. 



1 Jackson v. Kounsville, 5 Met. 127. 

2 Kimball v. Rowley Parish, 24 Pick. 347; Gay v. Baker, 17 Mass. 435; Daniel v. 
Wood, I Pick. 102; Wentworth v. Canton Parish, 3 Pick. 344; Howard v. North Bridufc- 
water Parish, 7 Pick. 137; Gorton v. Hadsell, 9 Cush. 508; Sohier v. Trinity Church, loy 
Mass. I, 21; Aylward v. O'Brien, 160 Mass. iiS; Rev. Laws, c. 36, §§, 19, 33, 34. 

^ Fassett v. Boylston Parish, 19 Pick. 361 ; Aylward v. O'Brien, 160 Mass. iiS. 

■• St. 1SS7, c. 404: Rev. Laws c. 36, §§ 47-54. See Stone v. Framing^ham, 109 Mass. 303. 
There is a serious question as to the constitutionality of this act, in so far as it authorizes 
the society, by a three-fourths vote, to transfer its property to the incor])orated churcli, 
without consideration, against the will of a minority of the society, who are thus deprived 
of jjvoperty rights. See Dow v. Xortluru Railroad, 67 N. H. i. Cf. Durfee v. Old 
Colony K. H., 5 Allen, 230; Treadwell v. Salisluiry Mfg. Co., 7 Gray, 393; Clark v. (J_iiiiuv 
Society, 12 Gray, 17; Warner v. Bowdoin Square Baptist Society, 14S Mass. 400; Canadian 
Religious Society v. Parmenter, iSo Mass. 415; Sohier v. Trinity Churchy 109 Mass. 1. See 
also McFadden v. Murjihy, 149 Mass. 341 ; Kane v. Shields, 167 Mass. 1,^12. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 53 



MEMBERS. 



April 2^, 1897- Al)bott. Waldo Lovejov 25 Hanover St. 

" Aborn, Charles Henry . . 130 Atlantic Ave., Swampscott 

" Adams, Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

Oc/. 20. 1902. Albree. John, Jr 279 Humphrey St., Swampscott 

M(i re /i 2G. i^)Oi. .Mdworth, Kliza A 394 Walnut St. 

July 2(), 1901. .\llen ICliza M 2 Walden St. 

Jan. 2S, 1S98. Allen, Lillie B 120 South Common St. 

A/>r// 2^, 1S07. .Mien, Walter B 2 Walden St. 

OcL 20, 1902. Alley, Addie H 1 Chestnut Ave. 

Ocf. 12, igoi. Alley, Emma R 273 Ocean St. 

J///v 28, 1902. Arrini^ton, Alfred A 44 Rockaway St. 

Jtr//. 27, 1902. Atkins, Annie J 157 Euclid Ave. 

" Atkins, Frank W 157 Euclid Ave. 

.1/;-// 27, 1897. Attwill, Alfred Mudge 19 Kensington Sq. 

J/mc 16, igo2. Attwill. Louis Hulen 134 Myrtle St. 

yl/;-// 27, 1897. Atwood, Luther 8 Sagamore St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Babcock, Bessie B 48 Breed St. 

A/>ri7 27, 1897. Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

^>//. 9, 1898. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2041 Prairie .\ve., Chicago, 111. 

.4/;-// 27. 1897. Baker, Frederick E 189 Lewis St. 

J/^^/r// 18.1899. Baker, Harry Mudge 115 Ocean St. 

.SV//. 30. 1 901. Baker, Lydia Maria 1 12 Johnson St. 

.1^^/77/18,1899. Baker, Lynette Dawes 115 Ocean St. 

.SV//. 30, 1 90 1. Baker, William Ezra 1 12 Johnson St. 

March 12, 1900. Barker, Ralph E 2.4 Chase St. 

,I//v7 27, 1S97. Barney, Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

Barney, William Mitchell 103 (ireen St. 

Barry. John NLithew 23 Tudor St. 

r^r/. 28, 1901. Barry, William J 23 Tudor St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Bartlett. Ella Doak <'>i .\tlantic St. 

Oct. 18, 1897. Bartlett, Hannah H u.S Nahant St. 

,/r///. 28, 189S. Bartlett, John S 61 Atlantic St. 

April 2\, u)02. Bauer, Fannie M 35 Grosvenor Park 

Bauer, Ralph S 35 Grosvenor Park 

,/«;/<- I, 1897. Beal, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

il/f?;-r//26, 1901. Beard, Cordelia AL E 389 Essex St. 



54 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Marcli 26, 1901 Beard. Daniel Breed 3S9 Essex St. 

Man// S, 1901. Bennett. Geort^e Edwin 44 Ireson Ave. 

.l/;'//27, 1897. Bennett. Josiah Chase 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

" Bennett, Larkin Everett 12 Avon St., Wakefield 

Mcnr/i 8, 1901. Bennett, Marv Eugenia Peail 44 Ireson Ave. 

,/<"/. 27, 1S99. Berry, Benjamin I Inn 238 Ocean St. 

J/iiie 9. 1899. Berrv-, John W 105 Franklin St. 

Berrv, Susannah W 105 Franklin St. 

March 27. 1900. Bessom, William B 44 Elsmere Place 

Oct. 1%, \()o\. Billings, Edward Baker 103 Liberty St. 

No-'. 24, 1897. Bliss, George S 24 Chase St. 

CAV. 28, 1898. Blood, Eldredge II 157 Maple St. 

March 8, 1901. Brainard, Albion II 53 Nahant St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Breed, Adelaide L 17 Nahant St. 

Dec. 28. 1899. Breed, Caroline A 22 Atlantic St. 

March 2G. 1901. Breed, Charles Orrin 54 Elm St. 

Ocf. II, 1899. Breed, Clara E 40 Nahant Place 

June I, 1S97. Breed, Emma Hawthorne 114 Gixen St. 

April 26. 1900. Breed, Florence L 22 Breed St. 

A'^)T'. 28, 1899. Breed, Frances Tucker 52 Baltimore St. 

Oct. II, 1899. Breed, Frank M 40 Nahant Place 

Nov. 28, 1899. Breed, George Albert 52 Baltimore St. 

April i"). 1897. Breed, George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

March 27, 1900. Breed, George Herschel 40 Nahant Place 

April 27, 1897. Breed, Henry W 48 Nahant St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Breed, Isabel Morgan 114 Green St. 

April 2"^, 1897. Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Nahant St. 

.lA^/r// 26. 1901. Breed. Lilla M 54 Elm St. 

March 8. 1901. Breed, Marietta 41 Franklin St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Breed, Mary E 47 Commercial St. 

Nov. 25, 1901. Breed, Richard 4S4 Summer St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Breed, S. Estelle 118 Green St. 

.\pril2-. 1897. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

Breed, Stephen Lovejoy 15 Newhall St. 

Breed, Warren Mudge 22 Breed vSt. 

.\/arch iS. iS()i). Bresnahan, Maurice V 128 Chestnut St. 

.\pril 11. 1897. Brigham. Frank F 17 Franklin St. 

Sept. 30, 1901. Brown, Bethany S 83 GreSn St. 

Brown, Kate M 83 Green St. 

April 2']', 1897. Brown, Mary Gerry 11 Light St. 

" Bubier, Frederick L 23 Fayette St. 

Z>('r. 30, 1901. Bubier, Harriet Atherton 267 Ocean St. 

April 21, 1897. Bubier, Joanna Attwill 172 Washington St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



55 



April z^.iSl)'] Bubier, MarvA 267 Ocean St. 

'■ Hubier, Marv Adelaide 267 Ocean St. 

D(c. 30, 1901. Bubier, M. Nellie 23 Fajette St. 

^/;-/7 27, 1897. Bubier, Nathan G Swampscott 

" Bubier, Samuel Arthur 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Sylvester H.. 2d 172 Washington St. 

Buffum, Charles 450 Union St. 

Tl/c^rr// 18, 1899. Buker, Frank Emerv 2:; Franklin St. 

.'l//v7 27, 1897. Bulfinch, Charles F 184 Lewis St. 

Burrill, Abbv M 44 PLinover St. 

" Burrill, John Irving 21, Nahant Place 

" Burrill. William A 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill. William Stocker 23 Nahant Place 

.4/;-// 29. 1901. Burrows, Helen 1 196 W^ashington St. 

Ja/i. 17, 1900. Burrows, Joseph E 196 Washington St. 

April 21, i()02. Caldwell, Elizabeth W 52 Cherrv St. 

il/^r/r// 26, 1901. Caldwell, Sarah M. N 23 Caldwell Crescent 

Ocf.2^, i()oi. Callahan, Julia F 2iHoljokeSt. 

y4/r/7 27, 1897. Carleton, Joseph (7. S 15 Ocean Terrace 

5^//". 30, 1 901. Carswell, J. Warren 47 Broad St. 

Apr/7 2^, iStj'j. Chadwell, George II 192 South Common St. 

-Fr/>. 2, igoi. Chase, Alice P 47 Baltimore St. 

MarcJi 12, 1900. Chase, Ellen S 24 Chase St. 

Chase, Frederick S 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1897. Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

Clark, Charles Edward 89 Broad St. 

.S'c//. 30, 1901. Clough, Abbie M 60 Cherry St. 

April 27. 1S97. Clough, Charles Bartlett 60 Cherry St. 

Clough, Harriet Kellev 253 Ocean St. 

iT/r/;r// 24, 1902. Clough, Martha Elizabeth 28 Baltimore St. 

April 27, 1897. Clough, Micajah Pratt 253 Ocean St. 

Afr^rc// 24, 1902. Clough, Orville A 28 Baltimore St. 

March 2(i,\()o\. Cobb, Bessie Brown 10 Nahant St. 

Cobb, Carolus M 10 Nahant St. 

Marc/i S, 1901. Colburn, Clifton 80 Nahant St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Collins, Timothv A i Inion St. 

Oct. 12, 1901. Comey, Augusta W Chatswortli 1 lall. Ocean St. 

Oct. II, 1899. Comey. Henry Newton . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

Oct. 26, 1900. Conner, Adalaide M 27 Sagamore St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Cox, Frank P 211 Ocean St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Cox, May Vaughan 211 Ocean St. 

April 2'j, iScj'j. Cross, Alfred 14 Chase St. 



56 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27, 1897. Cross, Charles A 8 Chase St. 

March 27. 1900. Currier, Benjamin W 13 Deer Cove 

April j6, 1900. Darcy, Alice M 54 Commercial St. 

April i--, 1897. Darcj, John W 54 Commercial St. 

y//()' 28,'i899. Davis, Ljdia C 34 Baltimore St. 

Jittic 16, 1902. Demerest, David 36 Sachem St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Didham. Sarah Barter 112 I lollingsworth St. 

(^ct. 20, 1902. Dorman, William E 157 Ocean St. 

Dec. 24, 189S. ^4^o\\ . Charles L 265 Boston St. 

March 18, 1899. Dunn, Anna Lincoln 22 Portland St. 

March 8, 1901. Durland, Henrietta 83 Chestnvit St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Dwyer, Elmer F 34 Maple St. 

April 2"]. 1897. Earle. Anthon\- 1 10 Henry Ave. 

Earle, Louise Snow no Henry Ave. 

March 18, 1899. Earle, Mabel no Henry Ave. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Emerson, Anna E 205 Ocean St. 

Emerson, Henry P 205 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22, 1897. Emerson, Philip 9 Beede Ave. 

,Ja)i. 2^, 1902. Emer_\', Mary E. B 17 Churchill Place 

Dec. T^o, 1901. Farquhar, John M 156 Broad St. 

April 2-j. iSg-j. Faulkner, Walter 33 Endicott St. 

A/arch 12, 1900. Fenton, Michael Angelo 740 Boston St. 

,/a//. 27, 1902. Filene, P^annie 628 Western Ave. 

Jul). 24, 1902. Foster. Susan M 173 I'nion St. 

J//lv 28. 1899. French, Hartwell S i Atlantic St. 

Sep/. 15, 1902. Fry, James Boyce Greenville, N. H. 

.\pril 27, 1897. Fuller, Addie G 26 Vine St. 

Fuller, Charles Sylvester 26 Vine St. 

" Galloupe, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

'* Galloupe, Lydia Ellis 13 Park St. 

" Garrison, William Lloyd Boston 

Ja)i. 27, 1902. Gay, Charles W 25 Exchange St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Gerry (L Luella 18 Sachem St. 

July 28, 1899. Goldthwait, Martha E 18 Portland St. 

April 2^, 1897. Goodell, Abner Cheney, Jr 4 Federal St., Salem 

.'Iwi,'-. 18, 1902. Goodell, Addie G 4 Broad St. 

April 2'], 1897. *Goodell, Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

Fel>. 2, 1901. Goodridge, Charles Sewell 79 Johnson St. 

April 27, 1897. Goodridge, Gertrude May 5 Prescott Place 

March S, 1901. *Goodridge, Micajah N 109 High Rock Ave. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 57 

Man// 12. igoo. Goodwin, Daniel W 92 Newhall St. 

/u'/>. 24. 1902. (roodwin, Joseph W 8 Burchstead Place 

Goodwin, Martha S 8 Burchstead Place 

Jem. 27, 1902. Gordon, Fred A 367 Broadway 

Z>cc. 24, 1898. Gove, William U 254 Lafayette St., Salem 

Aj>ri7 2'j, 1897. Graham, George Herbert 5 Seaside Terrace 

A/ay 19, 1902. Graves, Helen E 169 Western Ave. 

,4//v7 27, 1897. Graves, Isaiah iii Fayette St. 

Sepf. 30, 1901. Green. Charles Maxwell 85 North Common St. 

Apr/7 2'j, 1897. Green, Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

Oc/. 20, 1902. Green, Susan Francis 40 Tudor St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Greene. Robert II 369 Summer St. 

" Greene, Susan A 369 Summer St. 

Dec. 28. 1900. Grover, Charles S i6GroverSt. 

April 27. 1897. *Guilford, Samuel A 30 Bedford St. 

'• Hacker, Sallie H 201 Ocean St. 

April 7, 1899. Halliday, Marion 35 King's Beach Terrace 

Dec. 28, 1S99. Ilallowell, Caroline A 42 Hanover St. 

April 1']. i'S>()'i. Hannan, Joseph F 36 Rogers Ave. 

Harmon, Maria B 89 North Common St. 

•• Harmon, Rollin E 89 North Conuuon St. 

vl/(^ rr// 26, 1901. *Harney, Elizabeth 73 Baker St. 

April 27, 1897. Harris, Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

Nov. 28, 1899. Hastings, Charles. H 163 Ocean St 

Jai/.z'], 1902. Hastings, Lucie 1 163 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Hawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremont St. 

May 20, 1898. Hawkes, Samuel Saugus 

y4//-/7 27, 1897. Hawks, Esther H 16 Newhall St. 

Dec. 2^, 1900. Hayes, Amy Augusta 43 Eastern Ave. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Hayes, Elihu B 43 Eastern Ave. 

April z^], 1897. Heath, Caroline Putnam . . 348 Marlborough St., Boston 

Heath, Henry Warren . . • . . . 109 Hollingsworth St. 

July 28, 1899. Henderson, Abby M 79 Nahant St. 

il/«rf// 18, 1899. Herbert George C 17 Chatham St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Herrick, Nellie P 43 Autunm St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Hill, Alfred C 57 Chestnut St., East Saugus 

Marc// 26, igoi. Hill, Charlotte Farnsworth 14 Summer Place 

Hill, (ieorge Barnum 120 Lewis St. 

April 2T, iSc)']. Hill. Susan T 14 Summer Place 

Z;rr. 28, 1900. Hilliard, Alma ^■ 1 1 New Ocean St. 

.1/;-// 27, 1S97. Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 

Hilton, Eliza A 16 Henry Ave. 



58 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27, 1899. Hitchings, James W 176 Ocean St. 

Dec. 38, 1900. Hixon, Lucilla D 65 Baker St. 

Dec. 28, 1900, Hixon, Warren S 65 Baker St. 

Oaf. 20, 1902. Hodgdon, Charles Ellsworth 40 Tudor St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Hoitt, Augusta L 13 Henry Ave. 

April 2\, 1902. Holder, Anna N 18 Tapley St. 

Marck 2'],i()0o. Holder, Harriet E 9 Tapley St. 

May 19, 1902. Holder, Langdon II 18 Tapley St. 

Z><>r. 28, 1900. Holder, William C 12 Park St. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Holmes, Lucy T 67 North Common St. 

Jitlv 2S, 1902. Hood, H. Maria 23 Wentworth Place 

Dcr. 28, 1900. Hood, Julia Pond 18 Sachem St. 

April 2^], 1897. Houghton, John Clarkson 29 Vine St. 

Nov. 28, 1899. Houghton, S. Ellen i Light St. 

April 2'], 1S97. Howe, Oliver Raymond 20 Bedford St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Hunt D. Gage 142 Maple St. 

vl/;v7 27, 1S99. Huntington, Alice B iSi Allen Ave. 

Drr. 14, 1898. Ingalls, Edwin W 98 Laighton St. 

April 27. 1897. Ingalls, Emma F 229 Ocean St. 

Ingalls, J. Fred 605 Western Ave. 

Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls, Jerome 229 Ocean St. 

il/rtV 20, 1898. Ingalls, Mary Mower 189 Essex St. 

,/(/;/. 17, 1900. Ingalls, Robert Collyer ^t, Commercial St. 

April 7, 1899. Ireson, Samuel S 170 South Common St. 

July 28, 1902. Jackson, Elizabeth A 100 Essex St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. James, Frank M 145 North Common St. 

No7'. 24, 1897. Johnson, Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Johnson, Addie Mabel 179 Ocean St. 

April 2'], 1897. Johnson, Andrew Dudley . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

" Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

" Johnson, David N loi Newhall St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Johnson, Ellen M 35 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

April z-j, iSij'j. Johnson, Elliott Clarke 62 Mall St. 

April 'J, 1899. Johnson, Emma Burt loi Newhall St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 

Sept. 15, 1902. Johnson, Harriette Ellen 18 Broad St. 

April 21, 1897. Johnson, Henry W 98 South Common St. 

April 1, 1S99. Johnson, Lizzie Bishop 181 North Common St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



59 



April 2^1, 1S97. Johnson, Luther S 226 Ocean St. 

Dec. Z2, 1S97. Johnson, Lydia Hacker .... Winter St., East Saugus 

Dfc. 28, 1900. Johnson, Maria L r,i Mail St. 

Apr// 'J, 1899. Johnson, Mary May 326 Ocean St. 

Apr/7 2^, 1897. Johnson, Virginia Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

AI(Tv U), igo2. Johnson, Walter W 2:; Nahant St. 

Apr/7 27, iSg'j. Keene, Frank . . ■ 17 Atlantic St. 

iVtJf. 23, 1899. Keene, William Gerry n Grosvenor Park 

March 18, 1S99. Keith, Emma Barnard 34 Nahant St. 

March 2(i,\c)0\. Keith, Ira B 34 Nahant St. 

Apr/7 27, 1897. Kenney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

Oct. II, 1899. Kent, Harriet Marshall 112 Green St. 

/(/;/. 10, 1900. Kimball, Frank W 120 Washington St. 

Apr/7 2^], iSg'i, Kimball, Rufus 54 Harwood St. 

Ja>/. 10, igoo. Kimball, Sylvia H 120 Washington St. 

.■J//v7 27, 1897. Knight. Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill Ave. 

J////r 1, iSi)']. *Lamper Sarah E 16 King's Beach Terrace 

March 12, 1900. Lee, Caroline S 13 West Baltimore St. 

Lee, Nehemiah 13 West Baltimore St. 

Dec. 26, 1900. Lewis, Carrie Shillaber 31 Burrill Ave. 

May 20, 1898. Lewis, Charles W 140 Lewis St. 

Apr/7 27, 1897. Lewis, Jacob Meek 8 Fayette St. 

May 19, 1902. Libbey Olive Augusta 55 Rand St. 

A/ii:^. 27, 1S99. Lincoln, Margaret H 17 Summer Place 

Jai/. 27, 1899. Little, Mary F 4 Nahant, cor. l5road St. 

Little, William B 4 Nahant, cor. 15road St. 

Apr/I 7, 1S99. Littlelield, Horatia A 35 Franklin St. 

.•l//v7 18, 1898. Littletield, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

y1/;-/7 7, 1899. Littletield, William Bradbury 35 Franklin St. 

Sept. 4, 1900. Loring, John L 27 \'iolet St. 

Jan. 2^], 1902. Lovejoy, Alice L 64 Broad St. 

A/tg. 26, 1901. Lovering, Mary Atlelaide 8 Portland St. 

May 20, 1898. Lununus, Henry Tilton 4 Ihuison St. 

Apr/7 26, 1900. Linnmus, Lucinda M 43 Cherry St. 

Apr/7 21, 1897. Lumnuis, William W 43 Cherry St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. I^urvey, Samuel S 19 IJurchstead Place 

Apr/I 2-,. 1897. Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

Mansfield, Perley B 19 .Nichols St. 

Ja//. 27, 1902. Marsh, Arthur W 249 Chestnut St. 

Marsh, Caleb W 243 Chestnut St. 

" Marsh, Clara E 243 Chestnut St. 



6o LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

A^OT. 23, 1S99. Marsh, George E 12 Ire.son Ave. 

" Marsh, James M 12 Ireson Ave. 

J(f//. 27, 1902. Marsh, Marv E 249 Chestnut St. 

March "6, 1901. Martin, Angie P 388 Summer St. 

]\fai-c// 12, 1900. Martin, Augustus li 17 High Rock Ave. 

April 2.'], 1897. Martin, George Ilenrv 388 Summer St. 

Jan. 27. 1899. Martin. James P 24 Sachem St. 

Sept. 30, 1901. Martin. Sadie \\'ooillnir\- 3S8 Summer St. 

April i^j. 1897. ^hltthe\vs. Ihuiiet L 42 IIano\er St. 

Jioif I, 1S97. McArthur. Annie E. O7 Nortli Common St. 

April 2(1. 1900. Mclntire, Frederick ^L . . . i(k)() Mass. A\e., Cambridge 

Dec. 30, 1901. Megquier, Abbie E 18 Sachem St. 

J/<^;-r// 27. 1897. Merrill, Albert R 9 Henry Ave. 

Merrill, Harriet E 9 Henrv Ave. 

April 27. 1897. *Moore, Arthur Scutider 54 Mall St. 

Jan. 29. 1900. Moore, JiUia J 72 Fayette St. 

April 27. 1897. Moidton, Daniel B 36 Sagamore St. 

Moulton, James T 12 Cai-nes St. 

" Moulton. Katherine R 71 I'"ederal St. 

" Mower, Earl Augustus . . .99 Rockkuid St., Swampscott 

" Mower, Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St.. Swampscott 

Jtilv 28, 1902. Mower, Martin V. B 3 Mountain Ave. 

Jan. 29, 1900. Mudge, Ann Amelia 84 Green St. 

April 27, 1897. Mudge, Arthur Bai'tlett 27 Greystone Park 

Dec. 28, 1900. Mudge, Pamelia B • ... 115 Green St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Mullen, Charles H 26 Sagamoi-e St. 

Zl^T. 28, 1900. Mullin. James 1) 58 Newhall St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Mullin, Sarah Abby 58 Newhall St. 

March 26, 1901. Neal, Lydia C 127 Nahant St. 

.I//-/7 27, 1897. Neal, Peter Morrell 127 Nahant St. 

Neal, William E 127 Nahant St. 

Nor. 23, 1899. Neill, Charles F 17 Bas.sett St. 

Neill, ElizaJ 17 Bassett St. 

March 2('), 1901. Newhall. Annie Louise 72 Broad St. 

April I'j, I'&i-)']. Newiiall, Asa Tarlx'U 4S9 Lynn field St. 

" Newhall. Charles llcnr\ 14 West Baltimore St. 

April 21, 1902. Newhall, Clara A 3 Warren St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Newhall, Edward S 34 Ocean Terrace 

" Newhall, Emma D 2S1 Ocean St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Newhall, Emma E 24 Foster St., Saugus Centre 

No-'. 2T,, 1899. Newhall, Frances II 10 Deer Park 

J^eb. 20, 1900. Newhall, Francis S 18 Baltimore St. 



4 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 6l 

Marc// 2^ ,U)00. \cwhall, George II 343 Chatham St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Newhall, Guv 57 Silsbee Ave. 

April 2*], i^f)'^. Newhall, Harrison 19 City I lall Square 

Feb. 2, igoi. Newhall, Hattie C 23 Atlantic St. 

yl//-// 27, 1897. Newhall, Howard Mudge 5 Prescott Place 

" Newhall, Israel Aui^ustus 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, James Silver 13J South Common St. 

Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

Newhall, Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

Jan. 2']^ 1902. Newhall, Louisa J 34 Ocean Terrace 

^//-// 27. 1S97. Newhall, Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

Newhall, Marion Wentworth . . 132 South Common St. 

Jan. II. 1S99. Newhall, Mary Elizabeth 69 Newhall St. 

J//// 27, 1897. Newhall, Sarah Efhe 19 Park St. 

" Newhall, Stephen Cyrus 22 Atlantic St. 

Newhall, Terry Arden 69 Newhall St. 

" Newhall, Wilbur Fisk ... 74 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

Newhall. William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

Nichols, Frank Herbert 410 Summer St. 

Nichols, Fred Hammond 10 Prospect St. 

J//77 7. 1899. Nichols, Fred M 15 Essex Court 

J/;-// 27, 1S97. Nichols, Richard Johnson 32 Cherry St. 

Nichols, Thomas Parker 1 1 Prospect St. 

Z^cr. 24, 1898. Northrup, Arthur J 20 Baker St. 

Northrup, Hattie E 20 Baker St. 

Feb. 2, Kpi. Norton, Joseph C 30 Grove St. 

*Norton Sarah S 3° Grove St. 

April T, iS^)(). Noyes, Mary A 235 Summer St. 

Marc// 26.i()0\. O'Keete, Mary A 414 Broadway 

, I//-// 27. 1897. Oliver, James W 69 High Rock St. 

Jtu/. 2'j, HJ02. Oliver, William T 164 Allen Ave. 

J/tly 2(), ujoi. Osborne, Archer Preble 694 Western Ave. 

,/«;/<■ I, 1897. O'Shea, William 112 Market St. 

Jai/. 29. 1900. Parke, Emma F 3^^ Nahant Place 

. I/;// 26. 1900. Parker, Amelia J 37 Phillijis .\ve. 

('''(7.26.1900. Parker, Harriet Fitts 28 Lowell St. 

.I//-/7 27. 1S97. Parker, John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

,/(/;/. II. 1899. Parrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherry St. 

Parsons, Katharine M -106 Franklin St. 

. I//// 27, 1897. Parsons, Mary .\ Lynntield Centre 

Patten, Frank Warren 370 Summer St. 



62 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April i-f, 1897. Patten. Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Paul, Dorcas Ellen 20 IJloomfield St. 

April i"-^, 1S97. Paul, John M 9 Farrar St. 

Paul, Lucy F 9 P'arrar .St. 

Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

(hi. II. 1899. Percival, Mary E 79 North Common St. 

April 2'], 1897. Pevcar, Henry A 159 Washinj^ton St. 

March 10, 1898. Pevear, Mary F 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

April !•], 1897. Pevear, Sarah E 159 Washington St. 

Ih c. 24. 1898 Pevear. Waldo L 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Fc/>. i), 1899. Phillips. Anna Racillia 35 Bassett St. 

April i-), 1897. Phillips. Arthur John 35 Bassett St. 

v4/y-// 27, 1897. Pickford, Anna M 166 Washington St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Pike, Georgianna 29 Breed St. 

April I'], 1S97. Pinkham, Emily (i 64 Nahant St. 

J/n/e 16, 1902. Pond, Carolyn Ashle\' ... 17 Chestnut .St.. East Saugus 

No-\ 23, 1899. Pool, Howard F 72 Johnson St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Pool, Lena B 72 Johnson St. 

April 18, 1898. Porter, Bertha Currier loi F\vette St. 

Alii;'. 26, 1901. Porter, Carrie Childs 40 Nahant St. 

Porter, Charles W 40 Nahant St. 

April 18. 1898. Porter, Margaret Ellen loi Fayette St. 

April 27. 1897. Porter. Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 

April ^j. 1899. Prichard, Charles F. . 17 Sagamore St. 

April 2"]. 1897. Putman. Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

Putnian, Hannah V 40 Fayette St. 

" Richards, James H 72 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Rohinson, Elizabeth F 47 Commercial St. 

Jem. 27, 1902. Robinson, Martha G 19 Walden St. 

JiDic I, 1897. Robinson. William Pitt 1739 17th St., Washington, D. C. 

Marc// 12, ujoo. Rogers, Abraham L 311 West 97th St.. New York 

'■ Rogers, Emmelyn S. . . . 31 1 West 97th .St., New York 

April 2']. 1897. Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Henry Warren - . 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 

July 28, 1899. Rolfe, Charles E 22 Atlantic St. 

Rowell, Frank B 14 Linwood Road 

April 27, 1897. Rule Elizabeth E 80 Franklin St. 

Miiy 20, 1898. Ruppel, Eniil F 120 South Common St. 

" Ruppel, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



63 



J(ni. 17, 1900. Sanborn, Charles S 18 }^i„„ g^ 

April 1'], iS<)'j. Sanderson, Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

^/r/7 27, 1897. Sargent, William P 151 Chestnut St! 

Sawyer, Henry A 243 Boston St. 

Jan. 1^, 1902. Schlehuber, Alma 38 Estes St. 

April 2T,iSgT. Sears, Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

Ji'ly 2S, 1902. Seaward, Savandah A. ...... 75 HoUingsworth St. 

Apr// 27. 1897. Sheldon, Chauncey C 49 North Common St. 

Jdii. 27, 1902. Sheldon, Lucinda P 10 Hi<>h St. 

April 27. 1897. Sheldon, May L 49 North Common St. 

il/.n'3, 1901. Shorey, Martha H 70 High Rock St. 

Shorey, Susan E 70 High Rock St. 

Silsbee, Henry 38 Brookline St. 

il/(/rc// 12, 1900. Silsbee, Lillian L 60 Breed St. 

Z)('c. 28, 1900. Silsbee, Louise E 118 Green St. 

Marc/i i2,i()oo. Silsbee, N. Everett 60 Breed St. 

Z^cc. 30, 1901. Smith, Annie B 232 Ocean St. 

^//v7 21, 1902. Smith, Edward C 60 Tudor St. 

OCA28, 1901. Smith, Florence E 12 Nichols St. 

/f///. 28, 1898. Smith, Joseph N 232 Ocean St. 

Z?^c. 30, 1901. Smith, Mary Abby 640 Western Ave. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Smith, Sarah F 232 Ocean St. 

.>//. 27, 1902. Spalding, Anna H 164 Ocean St. 

Spalding, Rollin A 164 Ocean St. 

April z-j, 1897. Spinney, Benjamin F 270 Ocean St. 

Spinney, Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 

Bee. 30, 1901. Spinney, Zephaniah H 52 South Common St. 

^//-/7 27, 1897. Sprague, Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

/«//. 27, 1902. Sprague, Helen M 20 Nichols St. 

April 2'j, 1897. Sprague, Henry Breed . . ;^t, Walker Road, Swampscott 

Alts'- 26, igoi. Sprague, Laura L 33 Walker Road, Swampscott 

nee. 30, 1901. Stacey, Hannah M 13 Portland St. 

April 7, 1899. Stetson, Helen Louise 18 Sachem St. 

A/iire/i 26, igoi. Stevens, Adeline 152 Washington St. 

Oc/. 20, 1902. Stevens, Charles Goold 147 Washington St. 

Z>f'r. 28, 1900. Stevens, Gertrude W 100 Johnson St. 

(>e/. 20, 1902. Stevens, Mary B 147 Washington St. 

/?(c. 28, 1900. Stevens, Maurice A 100 Johnson St. 

April 27, 1897. Stewart, Samuel Barrett 141 Ocean St. 

Tl/rn' 20, 1S9S. Stimpson, Isabelle Bradford 24 Sachem St. 

JVof. 2^, iSgj. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

April 27, 1897. Stone, William 23 Lyman St. 

Or/. II, 1899. Sweetser, ALary Abby 55 Baltimore St. 



64 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Jiiii. 10, 1900. Sweetser, i\Iarv Anna .... Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April i~i, 1S97. Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

April 1-^. 1897. Svmonds. Walter E 57 Nahant St. 

Feb. z. 1901. Svmonds, Warren L 57 Nahant St. 

April 2'. 1S97. Tapley, Amos Preston Boston 

Tapley, Henry Fuller 280 Ocean St. 

" Tapley, Ida J 280 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1S97. Tarbox, James E 445 Walnut St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Teal, Harriet E Nahant Road, Nahant 

Dec. 28, 1900. Tebbetts, Georgiana B 37 Baltimore St. 

Jem. 17, 1900, Tebbetts, Kate P 23 Wentworth Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Tebbetts, Theodore C 37 Baltimore St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Thompson, Fredd O. . 120 Elmwood Road. Swampscott 

April 21. 1902. Thompson, William I) 10 Violet St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Thomson, Elihu Monument xAve., Swampscott 

Thomson, Mary L Moninnent Ave., Swampscott 

Jm/e I. 1897 Tirrell, Sarah E South Weymouth, Mass. 

Jem. 27, 1902. Titus, Augusta C 17 Breed St. 

Titus, I. Walton 17 Breed St. 

April 2"j. 1897. Tozzer, Samuel Clarence 62 Nahant St. 

Ma rc/i 2']. n)oo. Tripp, Thaxter N 11 Baltimore St. 

Tucker, Bertha B 44 Hamilton Ave. 

Tucker, Emma A 44 Hamilton Ave. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Tufts, Lucy R 31 Neptune St, 

April 21, 1897. Usher, Edward Preston Grafton, Mass. 

" Van Buren, James Heartt San Juan, Porto Rico 

July 28, 1902. \'iall, Charles S 39 Bloomlield St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. ^'iall, Edith L 19 Hancock St. 

July 28, 1902. ^'iall, Lizzie F 39 Bloomlield St. 

Nov. 23, 1899 Vogel, Frederick M 54 Elm St. 

July 28, 1899. Walter, Mary E -7-9 Prairie Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

Jan. II, 1899. Warner, Ellen L 17 Baltimore St. 

Warner, John G 17 Baltimore St. 

April 21, 1897. *Watters, William 26 South Common St. 

" Whitman, Josepli Henry 10 Sherman Terrace 

il/rtV 20, 1898. Whiton, Mary Ashcroft . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

Aug. 18, 1902. Whitten, Frank S 83 Exchange St. 

April 2"!, 1897. Williams, George Hamilton, Woodland Ave., Swampscott 
March 8, 1901. Wilson, Alice N 22 Henry Ave. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 65 

March 12, 1900. Wilson, Faustina Chadwell 423 Sunimor St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Wilson, Maude E 300 Boston St. 

Oct. \2, \C)0\. Wires, Harriet A 31 Ocean Terrace 

Wires, W\ Marshall 31 Ocean Terrace 

Nov. 2T,, 1899. Witherell, Eunice Smith 22 Portland St. 

April 27, 1S97. Witherell, Ivers L 22 Portland St. 

April 2"], 1S97. Wood, LanaJ 19 Franklin St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Wood, Ruth 19 Franklin St. 

April 2'], iS()']. Woodbury. Charles J. PL .■ 6i Commercial St. 

Dec. 22, 1897. Woodbury, Jennie Russell 60 Atlantic Terrace 

April 2"], iS()']. Woodbury, John 60 Atlantic Terrace 

" Woodbury, John P Boston 

April 26, 1900. Woodbury, ]SIaria B 61 Commercial St. 

Ji"/. 10, 1900. Young, Annah A 19 Garland St. 

Young, Elbridge S 19 Garland St. 

March 26, iC)Oi. Young, Herbert W Schenectady, New York 



* Deceased since 1902 Anmi;il Meeting-. 



66 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DECEASED MEMBERS. 



Charles Edward Parsons. 
George Henry Rich. 
James Albert Breed. 
LuciAN Newhall. 
Charles Smith Sweet.ser. 
Charles Otis Beede. 
Martin IIerrick Hood. 
Howard Perlev, 
George Blrrill Currier. 
Julia Ann Earle. 
John Lewis Robinson. 
Catherine Lloyd Johnson. 
Charles Barker Tebbetts. 



1)a\id Herbert Sweetser. 
Ebenezer Knowlton Fogg. 
Anna Amelia Hood. 
Amos Franklin Breed. 
Samuel Henderson Green. 
John Elbridge Hudson. 

ALvRTHA Louise Newhall. 

George Washington P'landers. 

Edward >L\ury Russell. 

^\'ILLIAM Francis Hill. 

Charles Coffin Fry. 
Joseph Goold Brown. 

Anna Maria Warren vSymonds. 



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THE l?EGI5Tlli? 



jjiAR Historicol Society, 



LYNN, riASSACHLISCTTS, 



rOR THE YEAR 1,902. 




LYNN, MASS. : 

Whitten & Cass, Pkinters 

1903. 






,u^^ 



Gift 
The Society 

l'Je»05 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 190^. 



President. 

BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Vice-President . 

GEORGE H. MARTIN. 

Treasiirer. 

CHARLES S. VIALL. 

Recording Secretary. 

HOWARD MTJDGE NEWHALL. 

Corresponding Sec ret a ry- 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Ch^vrles H. Newhall. 

George H. Martin. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

George S. Bliss. James S. Newhall. 

•William S. Burrill. John L. Parker. 

Philip A. Chase. Charles F. Peirce. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Henry F. Tapley. 

RuFUs Kimball. Charles S. Viall. 

Earl A. Mower. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COMMITTEES. 



William S. Bi rrili, 
George S. Bliss. 
Henry N. Cdmev. 



Custodians. 



Anthony Earle. 
Earl A. Mower. 
Charles F. Peirce. 



Philip A. Chase. 
MiCAjAH P. Clough. 

LlTHER S. yOHNSON. 



Finance . 



Charles H. Newhall. 
Henry B. Sprague. 
Charles S. Viall. 



To Srci/rc Pi(bli<ation of (^hi Tozvn Records 



Nathan >L Hawkk 
Philip A. Cil\se. 



RoLLiN E. Harmon. 
Iohn \\'()()1)iury. 



To Procure Information from Elderly Citizens 



Charles Bieki :\i. 
S. Oliver Breed. 
Isaac K. Harris. 
David X. Johnson. 



Henry W. Johnson. 
James H. Richards. 
William P. Sargent. 
William Stone. 



Henry F. Taplev. 
William S. Birrili. 
Harriet K. Clokhi 
Louise S. Earle. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 
Mary F. Little. 



Lectures and Public Meetings. 

Georcje H. Martin. 
Howard Mudge Newhall. 
Eugene A. Putnam. 
May L. Sheldon. 
Charles |. H. Woodbury. 



T.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Genealogy. 



John L. Parker. 
Joanna A. Bubier. 
Harriet K. Clough. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Susan T. Hill. 
John C. Houghton. 
Anna L. Johnson. 
Enoch S. Johnson. 



Melissa J. Littlefield. 
Harriet L. Matthews. 
Emma F. P. Mower. 
Harriet Fitts Parker. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Hannah V. Putnam. 
Warren L. Symonds. 



Howard Mudge Newhall 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 

James S. Ne\\hall. 



Publications and Printing. 

Henry F. Tapley. 
John G. Warner. 



George S. Bliss. 
Edward F. Bacheller. 
Charles A. Cross. 



Photography. 



|()HX W. Darcy. 
Leonard W. Packard. 



Collection of Historical Relics. 

Henry N. Comey. 
Emma H. Breed. 
Stephen L. Breed. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 
Caroline P. Heath. 



Mary A. Parsons. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Anna R. Phillips. 
Arthur J. Phillips. 
Ida T- Taplev. 



RuFi s Kimball. 
Isaac F. Galloupe. 
Arthur B. Mudge. 



Marking Historical Locations. 

Richard J. Nichols. 
John L. Parker. 
J.\mes H. Rk hards. 



Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Rufus Kimball. 
Georc;e H. Martin. 



JVccrology. 



Israel A. Newhall. 
Wilbur F. Newhall. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Comptlatio}! of Local History. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Israel A 

John C. Houghton. 
Benjamin N. Johnson. 
David N. Johnson. 



Newhall. 
Wilbur F. Newhall. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Elizabeth E. Rule. 



George H. Martin. 
Harriet L. Matthews. 



Howard K. Sanderson. 



Geology and Botany 



Albion Hale Brainard. 
Lillie B. Allen. 
Luther Atwood. 
Charles Neal Barney. 
Henry Newton Comey. 
Elmer F. Dwyer. 
Philip Emerson. 



Hexry W. Heath. 
Henry T. Lummus. 
John B. Newhall. 
M. Elizabeth Newhall. 
Ch.\uncey C. Sheldon. 
S. Clarence Tozzer. 
Louis A. Wentworth. 



Reception. 



Sallie H. Hacker. 
Ella D. Bartlett. 
M. Nellie Bubier. 
Lydia C. Davis. 
Anna L. Di:nn. 
Addie G. Fuller. 
Maria B. Harmon. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Mary M. Johnson. 



Virginia N. Johnson. 
KiTTiE M. Newhall. 
Marion W. Newhall. 
Katharine M. Parsons. 
Sarah F. Smith. 
S.\rah S. Spinney. 
Ida J. Tapley. 
Ellen L. Warner. 
Jennie R. Woodbury. 



and Members of the Council. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BY-LAWS. 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two years. 
ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second 
Wednesday evening in January, time and place to be 
determined by the Council. Twenty members shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. A less 
number may adjourn. Special meetings may be called by 
direction of the Council or President, and shall be called 
upon the written request of twenty members. 

ARTICLE III. 

COUNCIL. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the aff\iirs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate officers and agents, and make all necessary 
rules and regulations for itself and them. 



8 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and 
Treasurer, who shall be elected annually by ballot, from 
the members of the Council. They shall perform the 
usual duties of such officers, and such other duties as the 
Council ma\' require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July tirst of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularly called, by a \ote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LVXN IIISTORICAI. SOCIETY. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL, Recording Secretary, 

At the Annual Meeting of the I^ynn Historical Society on Wednesday 
Evening-, January 14th, 1903. 

Those who attended the meeting called to consider the 
formation of a Historical Society in Lynn, held at Oxford 
Club Hall, on Friday evening, December i8, 1896, will 
recall the goodly number who came together, and the great 
interest shown, but no one present at that meeting would 
have predicted that in six years the Society would have so 
interested the people of L3-nn that its membership would 
number five hundred and ten, yet that number has been 
reached at the present time, notwithstanding occasional 
withdrawals, and the decease of thirty-seven members. 

Not only has the Society steadily increased in mem- 
bership, but the Treasurer's report shows that all its bills 
have been promptly paid, and that there has been an 
accumulation of something approaching five hundred dol- 
lars, in addition to numerous gifts and additions to the 
exhibits and treasures of the Society. More than all the 
rest, the work and meetings have given much pleasure and 
information to the members, and through the newspapers 
to the people of Lynn, and brought together people 
interested in the welfare of our ancient town. 

Eleven of our members have died during the year ; 
Charles L. Dow, Jonathan W. Goodell, Micajah N. Good- 
ridge, Samuel A. Guilford, Elizabeth Harney, Lucy T. 
Holmes, Sarah E. Lamper, Arthur S. Moore, Lydia C. 
Neal, Sarah S. Norton, and William Watters. 



lO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

At the annual meeting on January 8th, 1902, the 
members accepted with regret the resignation of Mr. 
Henry F. Tapley as vice-president, but were glad to be 
able to retain his valuable services in the Council. 

The afternoon teas, in charge of the ladies of the 
Reception Committee, were largely attended on Monday 
afternoons during January, February and March, ending 
with a most enjoyable afternoon reception on March 31. 

On Januar}' i6th, a very instructive paper was given 
by the Hon. Howard K. Sanderson about the Revolution- 
ary Soldiers from Lvnn, with readings from the Journal of 
Henry Hallowell, who was a Revolutionary soldier. Mr. 
Sanderson had borrowed for the evening the old musket of 
Daniel Townsend, a Lynn soldier killed at the battle of 
Lexington, and presented the Society with a drum-stick 
used during the war by Isaac Orgin from L3'nn, contributed 
by a descendant. The history and list of Lynn soldiers, 
Lynn's part in the Revolutionary War, extracts from the 
journal of Henry Hallowell, and other interesting matters, 
are being gathered together to be published in book form 
by Mr. Sanderson, which will be a valuable addition to our 
local history, and a book of more than local interest from 
the stirring events which it will narrate. 

On February 6th, Miss Isabel M. Breed read a sketch 
of "Ebenezer Breed," being one of the first complete bio- 
graphical papers given before the Society. At the same 
meeting Hon. Nathan M, Hawkes read a valuable paper 
on the "Old Iron Works," quoting authorities and giving 
references, and being probably the most correct and authen- 
tic paper in relation to the iron works that has ever been 
prepared, a paper which should be printed by the Society. 

On March 20th, Miss Helen L. Stetson gave an 
interesting paper of "Sketches, Early History, and Things 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 

to be Seen at Nahant," a great deal of which was new to 
manY present. 

On March 27th, Hon. Elihu B. Hayes, who had been 
greatly interested in the establishment of libraries in towns 
in Massachusetts w^hen he was a member of the Legisla- 
ture, read a paper on Libraries. He especially called 
attention to the need of books for the blind, and as a result 
a committee of ladies was appointed, meetings of the com- 
mittee for organization were afterward held, subscriptions 
solicited and obtained, and a department for the blind is 
now in successful operation at the Lynn Public Library. 

On April loth, Miss Sallie H. Hacker read a paper 
which had been prepared bv Prof. Charles Frederick 
Holder of California on the subject of "The Earl}- Qiiakers 
of New England, with an historical sketch of Christopher 
Hold^er." Several members of the Society of Friends were 
present, and supplemented the paper with remarks. 

On April 24th, Mr. George H. Martin, vice-president 
of the Society, read a paper on "The Public Services of 
Strawberry Brook." He had collected specimens of the 
work done at the old print factory and had brought together 
in his paper a valuable lot of facts for preservation. 

On May 8th a social evening, in charge of the ladies, 
brought a most profitable season to a close. 

On August 20th, one of the most perfect excursions in 
the history of the Society took place, in the form of an after- 
noon ocean sail to Rockport. About one hundred made 
up the party which left the Henry Breed wharf on one 
of the Lynn Steamboat Company's boats. Tiie weather, 
the sea, and the temperature were simply just right : at 
Rockport the U. S. war vessels were manoeuvring and a 
near view of them was obtained in motion. It was a great 
sight. Marblehead harbor was visited on the return. The 



12 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

setting sun and the rising moon were features which could 
not be advertised, but never sun or moon looked more 
beautiful than to the returning excursionists. It was one 
of those rare davs and times for an ocean trip that some- 
times occurs. 

During the summer and autumn the Committee on 
Geology and Botany planned some delightful excursions 
and tramps, which gave pleasure to the large number who 
participated. On one occasion Bartholomew's Pond and 
ledges, saddle rock, wild-cat ledge, phaeton rock, and 
devil's den, were visited. On another the boulder path in 
Lynn Woods, Burrill Hill and Mount Gilead, with a lunch 
at Bassett Camp. Still another a tramp through Seldom- 
good Pasture and the Fay Estate. Mr. Albion Hale 
Brainard, chairman of the committee, and Mr. Elmer F. 
Dwyer, with the assistance of Mr. Isaac K. Harris on one 
of the walks, made the afternoons very profitably spent. 

On September nth, by invitation of the Newburyport 
Historical Society, who were celebrating their twenty-fifth 
anniversary, about one hundred members of the Society 
visited Newburyport, w^ere courteously and hospitably 
received, shown the Historical Society's rooms and points 
of interest about the city, taken on electric car rides to 
Atkinson Park and Parker River, and refreshments were 
served for all in connection with a basket lunch at the lat- 
ter place. A beautiful day and kind entertainment. 

On October 9th, by invitation of some members of the 
Danvers Historical Society, a day was spent in Danvers, 
visiting the Francis Peabody (King Hooper) House, the 
Israel Putnam House, Rebecca Nurse House, Oak Knoll, 
and other places of interest, terminating with a visit to 
the bungalow of Hon. Alden P. White on Davenport Hill, 
w^here Mr. White had in readiness a bountiful chowder 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. I3 

and coffee, which with the cordial welcome from Mr. and 
Mrs. White was greatly appreciated. 

An invitation was received from The Old Planters' 
Society to attend a field meeting at Gloucester on Sep- 
tember 4th, but as the invitation for Newbury port on the 
following week had been accepted, it did not seem to be 
possible to arrange, as notices had already been sent out. 

The North Shore Club extended an invitation to the 
officers and committees to attend a lecture on February 
1 8th, bv Rev. Samuel A. Eliot of Boston, on the subject of 
the "Genealogy of the New England Meeting House," 
which was accepted b}' many of the officers. An invita- 
tion was also received from the Second Universalist Church 
to attend an old time service on Sunday morning, February 
i6th, at which old time music and historical addresses 
were to be given. Manv members of the Society were in 
the audience. 

On October i6th, a paper was read before the Society 
by David N. Johnson, Esq., on the subject of "What is 
History." 

On November 6th, the Society invited the Sons and 
Daughters of New Hampshire to entertain Ex-Governor 
Rollins, the organizer of "Old Home Week," at the rooms. 
A large number of the organization and of the Historical 
Societv were present to listen to a very pleasant entertain- 
ment which had been arranged by the Sons and Daughters 
of New Hampshire. 

On November 20th, Miss Isabel M. Breed read a care- 
fully prepared and very exhaustive paper on all matters in 
relation to "Lynn Harbor." 

On December nth. Rev. Arthur J. Covell read a 
paper on "Old Boston and Lynn Regis," England, at the 
close of the lecture explaining a series of lantern slides 



14 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

thrown upon the screen, the slides being the property of 
the Lynn Public Library and having been obtained and 
presented to the library b}' Rt. Rev. James H. Van Buren, 
Bishop of Porto Rico, formerly of Lynn. 

On Monday evening, January 5th, 1903, the ladies of 
the Reception Committee conducted a largely attended 
reception, the occasion bringing together a fine gathering 
of Lynn people. 

The Council has done its usual faithful and painstak- 
ing work during each month of the year. A great many 
interesting matters are brought to the attention of the 
Council, which become a part of the Records, and the 
work of the Society. One or two matters might well be 
incorporated in this report, to illustrate. At the January 
meeting Vice-President George H. Martin suggested that 
the Society make a record of the death of John Ward Dean 
and also furnish a copy of the record to a local paper. 
The record as prepared by Mr. Martin was as follows : 
" The Council of the Lynn Historical Society desires to 
put on record its sense of the loss which it has sustained in 
common with all persons interested in the local and family 
history of New England in the death of John Ward Dean, 
librarian of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society. The breadth, minuteness, and accuracy of his 
knowledge, his kindly disposition, his friendly interest 
and sympathy retained to extreme old age have made 
two generations of searchers after historic facts his 
debtors." 

At the January meeting also was received a communi- 
cation from Mr. Frank Keene, a member of the Society, 
and former member of the Council, which bears very 
interestingh' on our local history. The letter was as fol- 
lows : — "Gentlemen; On Page 109, 'History of Lynn,' 



T.YNN IIISTORICAI. SOCIETY. I5 

1829 Edition, Mr. Alonzo Lewis makes this memorandum. 
' 1659 ; a road was laid out from Lynn to Marblehead, over 
the Swampscott beaches on the Hfth of July.' In reference 
to the part between Broadway and King's Beach the Com- 
mittee say, ' It has been a country highway thirty and odd 
years to the knowledge of many of us.' 

These forty-eight words which Mr. Lewis has re- 
corded, and which Hon. James R. Newhall simply quotes 
in his 1865 history without comment, are of historical 
interest to every citizen of Lynn ; as this is the first record 
of a public highzvax laid out in our country. 

Lynn has to her credit : 

Iron Ore, 1629, 

First Tanning of Leather, 1639, 

"New England's Prospects," William Wood, (written in Lynn,) 

1633^ 
Map of New England, William Wood, 1634, 

First Iron Works, 1643, 

Shoe Making, 1643, 

First Patent (To Joseph Jenks,) 1646, 

First Tariff enacted by Congress on Foreign made shoes, through 

the efforts of Ebenezer Breed, 1789, 

First recorded highway in 1659 should he placed to her credit 

also. 

Yours truly, 

Frank Keene." 

In April the Council appointed a Committee of three 
consisting of Capt. John L. Parker, Miss Harriet L. Mat- 
thews and Hon. Nathan M. Hawkes, to consider the publi- 
cadon of the Qiiaker Church records, and other church 
records, as to probable expense and advisability. The 
matter is in the hands of the Committee for consideration 
and report, but is iiere mentioned that members of the 



l6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Society may know that it is a matter in which the Council 
will take an interest if the Committee, after investigation, 
report advisable and possible to be done without too great 
expense. 

The Council in March voted that all donations of arti- 
cles of historic interest to the Society should thereafter be 
received and acknowledged by the Committee on Historical 
Relics, with the approval of the Council, instead of by 
the Recording Secretary as formerly, and the report of 
gifts received which has heretofore been a part of the 
Secretary's report, will be made by the Committee on His- 
torical Relics. The Committee carefully records in a 
book the description of gifts received, with names of the 
donors, lists them with a proper number on a card cata- 
logue, and makes thankful acknowledgment to contrib- 
utors . 

Tile Recording Secretary would once more take 
occasion to bring to the attention of all members of the 
Societ}', the faithful and personally interested work of the 
custodians, and without forgetting the work of all the 
members, to mention the work of the chairman especially. 
It is constant, almost everv day work, that demands time, 
done by him and another member of the Committee dur- 
ing business hours, in valuable time taken from business, 
without compensation or desire for it, but generously, from 
their great interest in the welfare of the Societ}'. They 
not only save money, but trv to make money for the 
Society in every way they can. The accumulation in the 
treasury to-day is largely the result of their management of 
the rooms. They do work which only those intimately 
connected with the management of the Societ}^ can know, 
and the object in mentioning it here is that all may know 
of it. 



I.y.NX HISTORICAL SOCIKTV 



17 



The Recording Secretary would like very much to 
retire from office. It was never his intention to monopolize 
the pleasures which the work of an Historical Society 
brings, for so many years, but having been actively inter- 
ested in the formation of the Society, he has felt it a duty 
and loyalty due to the Society to continue. He would now 
like to relinquish the work, and give an opportunity to 
some other to take it with its many pleasures and oppor- 
tunities to become intimately acquainted personally and by 
correspondence, not only with the members of our own 
Society, but with the members of other societies all over 
the world, which is a part of the Secretary's work. The 
Society needs a less occupied man, if possible a man with 
some leisure. There is no limit to the pleasure and w^ork 
which can become a part of the office. Our publications 
and our information are sought from ever}^ portion of this 
country, from England, and an application has come from 
far off Stockholm, Sweden. The Secretary takes this 
occasion to thank the Society for the confidence of so 
many years, and for the great pleasure and value it has 
been to him. 

In conclusion, the Secretary feels that the Societ\- has 
cause for congratulation once again. During the year and 
the previous years much has been accomplished, but not 
near as much as can be accomplished. We do not do all 
that we ought to do in the matter of historical investigation, 
publication, and dissemination. It rests individually upon 
the members to do it. There are members who could with 
pleasure and profit to themselves, investigate and write. 
The Society wants each member's knowledge, and that is 
where the lastin^r interest and benefit lies. We need more 
papers from more people. Personal responsibility and 
co-operation will keep up the interest, and make the Society 
more valuable to all. 



l8 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



EUGENE A. PUTNAM, Treasurer, 
in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dr. 

Receivoil from membership dues from Jan. 8, 

1902, to Jan. 8, 1903 $1,033 "o 

Cash for rent of rooms and other sources. . . . 345 75 

Portraits for 1901 Register 30 00 

Cash received for outings at (jjoucester and 

Danvers 1 10 85 

Balance. Jan. 16. 1902 504 31 

— — ~ $1,823 91 

Cr. 

For rent of rooms from Dec. i. 1902 to Dec. 31, 

1903 -1'390 00 

Janitor service 51 00 

S. S. Lurvey, music 12 50 

A. Schlehuber, catering S3 77 

William Miller, tlorist 5 00 

Secretary of Lynn Historical Society, postage . 43 00 

Envelopes and stamps ^3 47 

G. H. & A. L. Nichols, printing 44 00 

Thos. P. Nichols, printing 3^5-5 

Whitten & Cass, annual registers, 1,000 .... 179 25 

Whitten & Cass, postals 12 90 

Supplies for rooms through the year 79 .H 

Lynn Gas c^ Electric Co 49 09 

Hastings i^ Sons, advertising i7 05 

Lvnn Transcript files, 27 volumes 20 00 

George S. Bliss, chairman Committee on Pho- 
tography. ... 36 ''>3 

Frank E. Buker, lantern slides 10 00 

Hatch & Fernald, cases 41 37 

Re-staining floor of society room 57 Q."! 

Clerical service , 4 00 

Cash paid out, Gloucester and Danvers outings, 86 07 

Cash on hand. Jan. Sth. and in lianks 551 07 

— ^^ $1,823 91 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. I9, 

REPORT OF 
THE COMMITTEE ON HISTORICAL RELICS. 



The Committee on Historical Relics for the Society's- 
Collections have met regularly on the first Saturday of 
every month since March with the exception of July and 
August. The following gifts have been received and 
catalogued with a few exceptions which will be attended 
to in due season. The accessions since January 27th, 
1902, are as follows : 

From Charles W. Gay, framed photograph of Mower Bros, 
wooden building, burned in Lynn conflagration of 1889. 
The photograph shows its location on Willow street before 
its removal into Almont street, where the Lynn conflagra- 
tion began, which was directly in rear of where the picture 
shows it, the removal having been made to make way for a 
six story brick block which was also burned. 

From Mrs. Adeline B. Beal, Old Lynn City Right again. 
Certificate of membership of the Bunker Hill Monument 
Association ; picture of the Barker family. 

From Mrs. Susan T. Hill, yarn reel. 

From John W. Hutchinson, broad axe. 

From Miss Helen L. Stetson, limb of Endicott tree; copy of 
list of Lynn taxpayers in 1732. 

From William S. Burrill, order of exercises Lynn High School' 
alumni for years, 1S65, 1S66, 1867, 186S, 1S69, 1873, 1S74, 
1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880; a demand note on a Phila- 
delphia bank. 

From Miss H. Elizabeth Ladd, "History of the Quakers." 

From Mrs. M. J. Pope, La Fayette and Washington badge ; 
La Fayette stamp ; decanter over 100 years old ; old copy of 
vSalem Mercury ; piece of the first Atlantic cable ; piece of 
the old elm on Boston Common. 



20 LYXX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From George H. Waitt, drum-stick used by Isaac Orgin in 
the revolutionary war ; flax-hackel ; Constitution pitcher. 

From Mrs. Emma B. Keith, three shoes made in factory of 
George E. Barnard in 18S9; old razor; two old pocket 
books. 

From Mrs. Addie I. Johnson, warming-pan ; two pewter plat- 
ters. 

From Chandler L. Parker, shoemaker's jack. 

From Zephaniah H. Spinney, catalogue of officers, teachers and 
pupils of Lynn High School in iS^S. 

From Richard J. Nichols, framed sketch of the old Johnson 
house, known as the "Old Tavern," built in 1676, which 
stood on the westerly end of the pi^esent City Hall lot ; a 
spinning wheel. 

From Mrs. Emma F. Ingalls, copy of Jackson Republican and 
of Jenny Lind announcement. 

From Charles E. Ashton, copy of Lynn Record. 

From Charles F. Peirce, framed views of Lynn as seen after the 
conflagration in 1889. 

From George S. Bliss, silhouette of President William McKinley. 

From George H. Marsh, pair of slippers made by Christopher 
Robinson. 

From J. M. Caverly (sightless), copy of Boston Patriot for 1811 
and a letter written by himself. 

From Miss Clara B. Adams, three cents in paper money. 

From Ivers Witherell, banjo clock ; picture of Abraham Lincoln 
(framed) ; picture of Charles Sumner (framed) ; books. 

From Medford Historical Society, "Historical Registers." 

From New England Historical and Genealogical Society, Bos- 
ton, "N. E. Historical and Genealogical Register." 

From Mrs. Henry W. Rogers, spinning-wheel. 

From Mrs. George E. Bartlett, continental money ($1.00) ; 
Spanish vocabulary used by George E. Bartlett while on the 
"North Carolina," U. S. N., on the coast of South America. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 21 

From Mrs. Harriet Nichols, "Army and Navy Pocket Manual." 
From Mrs. Sarah F. Meader, sermon preached at the funeral 

services of Hon. John Burrill. 
From John C. Houghton, binding and title page for the sermon 

preached at the funeral services of Hon. John Burrill, 
From Charles H. Newhall, photograph of Dr. Abram Gould 
(framed). 

From Eben P. Berry, key to house of John Alley 3rd, corner 
of Franklin and Laighton streets, and speeches of Daniel 
Webster. 

From Mrs. Mary E. Whiton, 250th Anniversary invitation; 
directory First Church of Christ ; 250th Anniversary exer- 
cises (1632-1882) ; piece of old witch house, Salem; piece 
of John Hancock house; piece of Spanish Man-of-War^ 
captured at Santiago, "Maria Therese" (oak wood) ; cane 
made from the old Man-of-War "Kearsarge," and presented 
to Edward H. Ashcroft by W. W. Wood, chief engineer, 
navy department at Washington ; manual. First Church of 
Christ; store memorandum book of Mrs. E. H. Ashcroft; 
almanac, 1815; copy of Lynn Freeman, 1840; deed, 1726, 
Isaac Tilton to Samuel Dodge. 

From C. D. Seymour, piece of moulding and hand-wrought nail 
from Longfellow's "Wayside Inn." 

From Mrs. C. D. Seymour, cup from the Walker Block House, 
Sudbury, Mass. 

From Luther S. Johnson, melted plate glass from Lynn con- 
Hagration November 26, 1889, from Wooldredge's build- 
ing, corner of Exchange and Mt. Vernon streets. 

From John H. Nichols, "Canaan Band" original and only 
mouthpiece used in original Tarpoo. 

From Mrs. Alice Faulkner Adams, Augusta, Maine, Faulkner 
coat-of-arms. 

From C. S. Caswell, key of Alamo fortress, Mexico. 

From Mrs. Georgianna S. Pike, piano (1798). 

From Mrs. Amos Beckford, pitcher (china). 

From Henry F. Tapley two annual reports of the Essex Institute. 



22 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Hon. William M. Olin, secretary of state, Vol. 14 of 
"Mass, Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution." 

From Nathan M. Hawkes, 13th annual report of the Park Com- 
missioners of Lynn. 

From William D. Thompson, bound volume "The Friend" 
(newspaper) 1831-2. 

From Arthur J. Phillips, weather-vane of the "Old Niagara 
Engine Co." 

From Starr Parsons, an old chair. 

From Mrs. Mary A. Parsons, a tin kitchen ; an iron skillet ; an 
oil lamp of tin ; old flat-iron or clothes-presser (conditional). 

From A. Brickett, an old silk stamp (printing-block) which 
was used in the silk factory in Lynn many years ago. 

From William Foulds, an old cannon ball which was in the 
Charlestown navy yard about eighty years. 

From Harriet L. Matthews, various papers and programmes. 
From George A, Bodwell, picture of Frazier's building and 

post oflice about i860. 
From City Engineer George L Leland, surveyor's compass and 

chain used by Alonzo Lewis and others, presented to City 

Engineer's Department, city of Lynn, by Mr. Nickerson. 
From Frederick M. Smith, twenty-five Lynn views. 
From Merrill F. Delnow, Washington's Political Legacies (a 

memorial vol.) ; novel of a beggar boy, 1802. 

From Philip A. Chase, two photographs of old Bassett house. 
From Dummer Academy, catalogue for One Hundred and 

Thirty-Ninth Year. 
From Miss Emeline Mansfield, Indian basket. 
From Miss Martha Tower, picture painted by Malinda Leathe 

when fifteen years old. 
From Mrs. Harriet K. Clough, carriage-trunk. 
From Dr. John J. Mangan, frame of old programmes. 



LYNN HIS'JORR AL SOCIETY. 2^ 

From Mrs. Ellen Woodbury and Miss Harriet Lye, old baby- 
wagon ; old shoe-basket ; coffee-grinder ; foot-stove ; shoe 
tools ; woolcards ; maps. 

Report of Providence Public Library, R. L 

From Lynn City Government, old jury box. 

From Eben Parsons, flip-dog or loggerhead ; sermon by Rev. 
Joseph Mottey, Jan. 4, 1769. 

From Mrs. Mary A. Parsons, andirons about 100 years old and 
photograph of John and Abigail Nash. 

From James S. Newhall, "The Constitution of the Lynn Fire 
Club instituted in Lynn Jan. 2, 1826, revised 1834." 
"Constitution of the Lynn Light Infantry, adopted April 
30, i860, company chartered June, 1812, reorganized May, 
1852; list of names of the Lynn Fire Club; report of the 
school company, 1842; fire regulations adopted for 1837; 
Farmer's Almanac for 1846 ; Essex Register, Salem, July 7, 
iSio; report of the Lynn School Committee, March, 1843; 
Transactions of the Essex Agricultural Society, 1836 ; reports 
of the School and Auditing Committees of Lynn, 1837-8; 
copy of an Act to establish a Police Court in the town of 
Lynn, passed in Legislature April, 1849 ; Nahant bank note, 
1839; receipt, 1841; share in Lynn Omnibus Co., 1839; 
map by Alonzo Lewis of post office and railroad depot, 
1842; directories for 1S41 and 1851 ; "The Life and 
Adventures of Dr. Calb, by Aaron Lummus; "The By- 
Laws of West Lynn Mutual Loan and Fund Association 
organized March 16, 1859. 

From D. P. Corey, History of Maiden, 1633-1785. 

From Lieut. Elbridge L. Saunderson, Swampscott, framed 
photograph of Bubier block on Market street, destroyed by 
fire December 25, 1868. 

From Mrs. Warren Newhall, an abstract of Treasurer's Report, 
Town of Lynn for 1821, Ezra Mudge, Treasurer. 



24 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From the Misses Lucinda, Martha and Helen M. Sheldon, the 
loan of map of the United States, 1840; map of Essex 
county, 1852; map of Lynn, 1856; map of Europe; old 
quilting frame ; mortar and pestle ; gridiron ; toasting iron; 
bed wrench; candle mould; tin kitchen; Yankee baker; 
Dutch oven ; bread tray ; oven slice ; biscuit baker ; skim- 
mer ; square toe last. 

Proceedings of the eighth annual meeting of the Nantucket His- 
torical Association. 

From Charles H. Hastings, hand wrought nails from the " Old 
Castle," Nahant. 

From Essex Institute, Vol. XXXVHI Essex Institute Collection. 

From Capt. Henry N. Comey, bound volume "Boston, Old and 
New." 

From Mrs. Susan T. Hill, two-thirds of a dollar; old bank 
checks. 

Proceedings of the Fitchburg Historical Society, Vol. III. 

From Rev. E. T. Curnick, bound volume, "A Brief History of 
the first M. E. Sunday School in New England, St. Paul's, 
Lynn, by Ex-Supt. Edwin J, Graves. 

From Benjamin N. Johnson, bound volume, "Report on Kings 
Lynn Records," Harrod. 

From Mrs. Florence E. Smith, framed picture, wreck of the 
Bark Vernon, 1859. 

From Dr. Charles H. Bangs, wool spinning-wheel. 

Proceedings of the Worcester Society of Antiquity, Vol. XVIII, 
for 1902. 

From Howard Mudge Newhall, hospital collection box. 

The committee purpose to make a collection of pub- 
lished articles for a scrap book which are of historic and 
local interest. All members of the Societ}^ are requested 
to reserve such articles as they find in this line to assist the 
committee. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIKIV. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PHOTOGRAPHY. 



The work of the Photographic Committee is one of 
the unique features of the Historical Society, and the wis- 
dom of making small annual appropriations for this work 
is illustrated in the collection of photographs already 
obtained. 

The value of such a collection is apparent when it is 
found that old buildings photographed by members of the 
committee only a short time ago have been destroyed or 
remodeled and all trace or record would otherwise have 
been lost. 

The attempt to obtain, at small cost, photographs of 
public buildings has met with many difficulties. While it 
is an easy matter to purchase photographs of historic and 
interesting places in the surrounding towns and cides there 
is no place wdiere similar views can be found in Lynn. 
This is not due to lack of material for there are many 
picturesque and interesting buildings in Lynn. A search 
will show, however, that there is nothing on sale except a 
few photographs of Lynn and Swampscott beaches, the 
Lynn Woods, Nahant Rocks, City Hall and two or three 
churches. 

Visitors often inquire for these souvenirs and it would 
seem profitable as well as of immense value if some one 
would take up this work. 

Many old negatives have become lost through fire, 
deaths, removals, sales of business, etc. The veteran 
Market street photographer, William T. Bowers lost over 
ten thousand negatives in a fire several years ago 
which would be of untold value to the vSociety at the 



-26 LYXN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

present da}'. All the attempts to trace the negatives made 
by the old time photographers have proved fruitless. This 
emphasizes the importance of the work we are doing. 

Prints have been collected and printed on heavy plati- 
num paper as being the most permanent. Of these eleven 
are copies of old photographs, twenty-seven are copies 
from wood cuts, sketches, etc., and seventy-three are 
from original negatives. 

Members of the Society are earnestly requested to 
assist the committee by gifts of photographs, sketches, etc., 
information as to where such exist, and facts relating to the 
histor^■ of photographs already made. Photographs of 
public buildings such as churches, schools, engine houses, 
etc., are especially desired and will be purchased if informed 
where they can be obtained. 

George S. Bliss, 

Jauiiarv 14, Jgoj. Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GEOLOGY 
AND BOTANY. 



The Committee on Geology and Botany beg leave to 
report that it had several meetings and that plans have been 
outlined whereby it is believed the work of this depart- 
ment may become of more value to the Society. 

Under the direction of the Committee four Saturday 
afternoon outings were enjoyed by large numbers of the 
Society. These took the nature of tramps, with the 
express object of observing geological formations and con- 
tour, and the flora of local sections. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIKTY. 27 

The Hrst walk was April 19th and included Bar- 
tholomew Pond and the region south to Sluice Pond. The 
next tramp began at Flax Pond, including the ledges to 
the north, and the trees and flowers of the Fay estate. 
The third outing was in the Lynn Woods. Sections of 
the party, after pursuing various paths, met for coffee and 
lunch at Bassett Camp, which was open through the 
courtesy of Judge Hawkes, Chairman of the Park Com- 
mission. The fourth outing was a mushroom trip under 
the guidance of Dr. Dearborn in the late fall. 

The Committee believes that a collection of Lynn 
minerals and flowers should be made and plans are matur- 
ing to that end. Arrangements are also being made for 
the spring and summer walks, which were so successful 

last season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Albion Hale Brainaru, 

CliairiniDi. 



28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



NECROLOGIES. 



DR. WILLIAM WATTERS 

Was born in the town of Melbourne, in the Province of 
Qiiebec, Canada, in December, 1843. His parents were 
from Halkirk, near the extreme north of Scotland, and 
had been in Canada but a short time previous to his birth, 
his brother, two years younger, having been born in 
Scotland. Brought up on a farm, and accustomed to a 
farm life, study was at first a hardship to him and a quiet 
retiring disposition was here acquired that remained 
throughout life. 

Having attended the village schools, he went to St. 
Francis College in Richmond for several sessions prepar- 
ing for a teacher's life. Passing the normal examinations, 
several vears were spent in teaching. Later he decided to 
study medicine, and with this in view went to the medical 
school in Philadelphia, paying liis own way by working as 
a stone mason on the Central Vermont R. R. during the 
summer vacations and during one entire year. Graduat- 
ing in 1868 he went to Searsport, Me., to begin practice. 
Two years later a younger brother, Henry, now a physician, 
also settled in the adjoining town of Stockton. 

In 1872 Dr. William Watters married Miss Judith A. 
Nichols, a native of Searsport, a lady of not strong phy- 
sique but one who during her entire married life proved to 
be a helpmeet in the truest sense. In 1874 ^ ^^n was born 
but died in a few months. The tamily in 1875 moved to 
Mechanic's Falls, Maine, where in 1876 a second son, 



I.VNN HISTORIC A L SOCIETY 



29 



William Henry, was born. After a few months the wife 
succumbed to an attack of pneumonia. The home was 
broken and the infant boy was taken to Searsport by his 
mother's sister where he remained for ten years, his father 
remaining at the Falls engaged in professional cares. 

Once again, in 1885, ^'^^ changed his place of labor, 
this time to Lynn, Mass. Here he first located on Market 
street, later moving to 32 City Hall square and fmallv 
buying the estate at 26 South Common street. 

In June, 1894, he married Miss Maria Raddin of 
Cliftondale, who survives him. 

The spring of 1900 saw the accomplishment of a long 
wished for rest, a trip abroad whereby a great improve- 
ment w^as noticeable both in rest for the body and change 
of thought for the mind. 

In very inclement weather in the winter of 1902 he 
persisted in attending to several patients when himself 
suffering from a severe cold and in this w^ay he contracted 
the same disease that had already been so fatal to others of 
his famil}' and failing to rally from it rested from labor on 
the morning of February i8th. The interment was in 
Searsport, Me. 

Dr. Watters was a church member from early youth, 
having at the time of his death been a member of the 
official board of the First Methodist church of L3mn for 
some 3'ears. In the orders of Masons and Knights of 
Pythias he was especially interested, belonging also to the 
Odd Fellows, Red Men and other secret societies. 

Dr. Watters' son, William Henry Watters, graduated 
from Boston University School of Medicine, passed a year 
of study and travel in Europe and is a practising physician 
in Boston and Lynn. 



30 I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

MICAJAH NEWHALL GOODRIDGE. 

Among the early ones who left the Mother Countr}- to 
make a home among the hardy Massachusetts colonists 
were William^ Goodrich and his wife Margaret. They 
settled in Cambridge and soon removed to Watertown, 
where their first child Jeremiah- was born March 6, 1637 
or 1638 and married Mar}- Adams in 1660. William the 
father died in 1683. 

From these the line is as follows : Jeremiah,'' 
Jeremiah,'^ born December, 1708, married Abigail Lowell 
in line supposed of James Russell Lowell, 1739, Joseph,'' 
born in Newbury, was a Revolutionary soldier, Bailey," 
born 1781, married Betsey Collins, Bailey, Jr.,' married 
Mary Ann Newhall, 183 1, and these were the parents of 
the subject of our sketch, Micajah Newhall Goodridge. 

He was born in Lynn November 5, 1839, and died at 
his residence on High Rock avenue, on February 22, 1902, 
aged 62 years, 3 months, 27 days. 

The mother, Mary Ann (Newhall) Goodridge, was 
also a native of Lynn, daughter of Paul and Mary (Mudge) 
Newhall, and descended from Thomas,^ the first white child 
born in Lynn, Joseph,-^ Daniel,^ Joseph,^ Micajah,'^ Paul.'' 
Our subject was named for a deceased son of Paul, who in 
turn had been named for /n's grandfather, Micajah New- 
hall, who fought at Lexington. 

On the grandmother's maternal side, Thomas^ Mudge, 
emigrant, was born in England and was living in Maiden 
in 1657. John^ served in Narragansett or King Phillip's 
War in 1675, John, '^ John, ■^ Nathan Mudge, '^ the last named 
being a Revolutionarv soldier under Capt. Simon Brown 
and is also on Ticonderoga rolls (as per Mudge memor- 
ials), Mary,'' wife of Paul Newhall. 




M/CA./Air \i: U //ALL GOOL^R/DCE. 



LYNN HISTORICAI. SOCIETY. 3I 

Mr. Goodridge attended the Lynn Public Schools- 
closing with the High School. He was one of the early 
graduates from the new school-house. He graduated in 
1855 under Jacob Batchelder, the tirst High School princi- 
pal. After graduating he learned the shoemaker's trade 
which then meant to learn whatever pertained to a shoe in 
all its stages. For the most of his life he was in some 
employment akin to or connected with this leading industry 
of our city. 

Soon after learning his trade he purchased the retail 
shoe store of G. Z. Collins, formerly Egbert Burrows, on 
Market street near Tremont, in what was then the Lynn 
Free Library Building. 

About 1872, he went to Charlestown and Claremont, 
N. H., as foreman in shoe factories there. After leaving 
factory work he was employed for some time by Wellman 
Osborne, having charge of the department in his Central 
square retail store, in Lvnn, until the square was burned 
out in the fire of 1889. 

In 1890, he connected himself with George Z. Collins, 
his brother-in-law, in leather board business, having mills 
in Ashland and Tilton, N. H., and at the time of his death 
was connected with George Z. Collins and Arthur J. 
Phillips as G. Z. Collins & Co. He was also president of 
the East Tilton Pulp Manufacturing Company. 

His literary tastes were early shown as a member of 
the Athenian Debating Club, which met on Market street 
near Libertv street, and of which Hon. Carroll D. Wright 
and other well known local men were members. 

He was a member of the Historical Society, Y. M. 
C. A., and Providence Lodge, I. O. O. F. He was a 
Republican and a strong temperance advocate. 

His life was in his home and in the church of his 
choice, the Methodist Episcopal, in which he was an 



32 I.YNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

active and zealous worker and a strong supporter of all 
its interests. As attendant and member of the Old Lynn 
Common church he had served his church in some capacity 
for most of his life. At the time of his death he was treas- 
urer of the Sunday School, secretary of the official board, a 
class leader and steward. For twenty-one years he was 
absent from church only twice when in the cit}'. He was 
a member and at one time director in the Methodist Social 
Union of Boston, and an active worker in the Camp Meet- 
ing Association of Asbury Grove. Versatile in talent, 
active, ardent, he was ready to help in all departments of 
church, city or state. 

In 1866 he married Georgianna Frothingham of Lynn. 
She survives him with three children, Harriet L., a teacher 
at St. Albans, Vt., Alice M., and Frederick S. Goodridge, 
a graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Note. — Micajali Newhall, his great grandfather, was one of those recording deed of 
land of M. E. Church where Lee Hall now stiinds. 



CHARLES LOUIS DOW 

A well known and universally respected citizen of Lynn, 
died at his home, 265 Boston street, Tuesday, March 
4, 1902, at the age of 66 years 4 months and 16 days, 
having been stricken with paralysis about two 3'ears 
before. He was born in the house in which he died, 
and it had always been his home and the home of the Dow 
family for generations. It was built in 1750, and is known 
as the Dow homestead. Mr. Dow was the son of Mood}' 
Dow, for a long period proprietor of the old Lynn Hotel, and 
Charles L. Dow was proprietor of the old L^-nntield Hotel. 
Before the war he was a member of Lvnn Light Infantry, 




JONATHAN WOODWARD GOODELL. 



T."SNN IIIsroRlCAL SOCIE'lV. 33 

Co. U, Eighth Regiment, and enlisted for nine months. 
He was hiter discharged on account of iUness, but on liis 
recovery entered the commissary department at City Point, 
\'a., under Lieut. Cate, where he remained until the close 
of the war. Gen. E. W. Hinks married one of his sisters. 
Mr. Dow was a member of Post 5, G. A. R., Lynn His- 
torical Society, Lynn Veteran Light Infantr}-, Union 
Commandery, U. O. G. C, and a charter member of the 
North Congregational Church, serving as clerk of the 
church for several years. He received his education in 
Lvnn schools and a commercial college in Boston : was- 
receix'ing clerk for the old Boston firm of Spalding, Hav 
&: Wales, twelve years, and afterwards engaged in the 
milk business, continuing twent}" years, until illness com- 
pelled him to retire. He was twice married. His first 
w if e was Mary, daughter of Josiah R. and Phebe Clough, 
of Lvnn, and his second wnfe Annie M. Williams, who died 
about eight }'ears ago. Three children survive him, 
Charles W. Dow, Mrs. C. E. Harthan and Miss Ellen 
Dow, all of wdiom reside in the old homestead. 



DR. JONATIL\N WOODWARD GOODELL 

The second oldest physician of our citv, died at his home, 
4 Broad street, March 13, 1902, after an illness of a 
few weeks. He was born in Orange, Mass., August 
2, 1830, the son of Zina (joodell, his mother, Polly, 
beinir the daughter of Amos Woodward of that town. 
Dr. Goodell was educated in the public schools of his 
native place, the Melrose Seminary in West Brattleboro, 
\'t., and at Saxtons River Academy in Rockingham, 
same state. Graduating from the Berkshire Medical Col- 
lege, he practiced in Greenwich, Mass., ten years, and 



34 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

removed to Lynn in February, 1866, where he resided up 
•to the time of his decease. Devoting himself with energy 
and skill to his chosen profession, he secured a large and 
successful business. He was active in the American 
Medical Society and Massachusetts Medical Society, and 
served as President of the Essex Seventh Medical Associa- 
tion, commanding in all these institutions the confidence 
and respect of his professional brethren. He was an 
enthusiastic student of agriculture and horticulture, and 
was president of the Floughton Horticultural Society 
several years, and served on important committees of the 
Essex Agricultural Society. He was actively engaged in 
the work of the Lynn Historical Societ}' ever since its 
organization. Dr. Goodell was a descendant from Robert 
Goodell, the old Essex pioneer, who came over in the ship 
Elizabeth. Among the passengers was Richard Wood- 
ward, the lineal ancestor of Dr. Goodell's mother. Dr. 
Goodell married, November i, 1868, Martha Jane, daugh- 
ter of Jason Abbott, of Enfield, Mass., and is survived by 
one daughter. The deceased was a man universally 
respected and beloved by many. The Lynn Daily If cm, 
in the issue on the day of his death, contained an editorial 
closing with these words : — " We could say of him in the 
words of Thomas Dunn English, 'your presence a bless- 
ing, your friendship a truth.' " 



SAMUEL AUGUSTUS GUILFORD 

Was born in Lynn, January i6th, 1823, and died at his 
residence, No. 30 Bedford street, April 26th, 1902, aged 
79 years, 3 months and 10 days. He married Lydia J. 
Goodwin, of Wells, Maine. There were born to them 




SAMTEL AraCSTCS l,ri LIOK IK 



LYKX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



35 



seven children, all of whom are now living, viz : — Lydia, 
Alice M., Olive A., George H., Samuel F., Eva A., and 
Frank C. His father, Samuel Guilford, was born in 
Danvers, now Peabody, and being a small boy at his 
father's death he went to live with a familv by the name of 
Needham, near Lvnntield Centre, and from Lynntield he 
came to Lynn, making his home on Shepard street, where 
he started an express business to Boston, Salem and 
Peabody. He married Mary Witt, of Gloucester, and 
there were born to them five children, of whom Samuel 
Augustus, the subject of this sketch, was the youngest. 

Mr. Guiltbrd was 14 years old when his father died,, 
and thereafter he was thrown on his own resources. He 
attended the Lynn public schools and was a pupil of 
Master John Batchelder. 

After serving a short apprenticeship at shoemaking' 
he learned the trade of a carpenter, and soon after entered 
into partnership with S. Oliver Breed, as builders, which 
business they continued until 1858, after which time Mr, 
Guilford continued the business alone until 1874, when he 
went into the lumber business, taking as a partner Amos 
P. Tapley. The location of their business was at the foot 
of Commercial street, then known as Breed's Wharf. 
Subsequently he took into partnership Horace II. Ather- 
ton, and his son, Samuel F. Guilford. Its location was 
removed in 1896 to Summer street, at the crossing of the 
Saugus Branch Railroad. Mr. Guilford's mother was a 
very devoted Christian woman, and so her little son, 
Samuel, was duly baptized at the First Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, on Lynn Common, and during all his lite he 
was a constant attendant at this church. He was one of 
the charter members of the Lynn Historical Society, and 
an active member of its lirst council. He was for manv 



36 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

years and up to his death a director of the Lynn Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company. 

With the death of Samuel A. Guilford the community 
and our city have parted with a citizen whose life and his- 
tory are but a reflection of the progress of Ljmn, begin- 
ning with its early da3"s and reaching to the time when it 
has a population of 70,000. Born of parents whose 
pecuniary condition was such that he was obliged to pro- 
vide for himself at an early age, he started out to face the 
realities of life when only a boy as a driver on an express 
wagon to Boston, over the Salem turnpike, and it was at 
this time, during intervals of leisure, that he applied him- 
self to the study of books and other reading which later in 
life laid the foundation for a storehouse of useful knowl- 
edge. As a man of affairs and business, measured by 
results, he was singularly successful, and deservedly so. 

At the beginning of his career he put forth his best 
efforts : was thorough, honest and persistent, never relax- 
ing his interest, but continuing until his physical condition 
compelled him to retire from active business, in which he 
had been engaged for tiftv years. 

He was a man of quiet tastes and in every sense a 
home keeper, yet withal the most sociable and agreeable 
of men. Of wonderful memory and acute powers of 
description, he had the faculty of imparting information 
that was entertaining as well as useful. 

For political life he had no taste. Although urged 
by the citizens repeatedlv to enter into municipal affairs he 
always declined to be a candidate for any public office, 
yet his interest in men and measures which stood tor good 
government always received his active support. 

In brief he was a representative type of the self- 
made man and, during his life, which exceeded the 




SARAH SAMAyTHA (HOLMES) NORTOX. 



LYxNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 37 

allotted time of man, he made the world better by reason 
of his having lived in it, and, by his death, another link 
has been dropped from the chain which unites the past 
with the present. 



MRS. SARAH SAMANTHA (HOLMES) NORTON, 

Who died in Lvnn, May 30, 1902, was born in Kingston, 
Plymouth county, Massachusetts, August i, 1850. She 
w as the eldest child born to Joseph and Rebecca Darling 
(Chandler) Holmes. Her line of descent from William 
Holmes^ of Kent, England, being Rev. John,- Joseph,-^ 
Ephraim,^ Ephraim,'' Tilden,'' Joseph.' Her maternal line 
was from Edmund Chandler,^ Joseph,- Joseph,-^ Philip,'* 
Nathan,'^ Ephraim,'' John," Rebecca.''^ 

Mrs. Norton came from good old Pilgrim stock, 
families prominent in Phanouth countv from its earliest 
settlement, among them Gov. Bradford, Stephen Hopkins, 
William Brewster, Francis Cook and Edward Doty, pas- 
sengers on the Mavflozvcr. 

Educated in the public schools of her native town^ 
Mrs. Norton took high rank in all her studies, excelling in 
whatever line of work she attempted, a trait that grew 
stronger as the years passed on. As a child her home life 
was replete wdth pleasant acts and deeds, an example of 
gentleness in her care and consideration for others that was 
remarkable for one of her tender years. She was married 
November 18, 1869, to Joseph C. Norton, Jr., son of 
Joseph C. and Matilda Copeland (Alden) Norton, coming 
to Lynn that year, where she resided until her death. Mav 
30, 1902. 

Mrs. Norton was an indefatigable student and com- 
piler of genealogical records, interested not only in her 



36 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

own line, but in all genealogical research. She was a 
valuable contributor to the columns of the Boston Trans- 
cript, thereby solving many a puzzle for anxious querists. 
To the Lynn Historical Society she gave much time and 
research, holding at the time of her death the position of 
secretarv to the Committee on Genealogy. She was a 
woman of strong character, her nature open and trustful, 
frankness and sincerity a marked characteristic. She had 
a keen and sensitive love of nature, with a rare botanical 
knowledge, having prepared an herbarium comprising 
more than four hundred mounted and named specimens of 
the flora of New England, principally Essex county. "To 
her every tree, shrub, and liower was a friend.'" 

She was active in all benevolent work, a member of 
the Central Congregational Church, an ex-secretary and 
president of its Ladies' Aid Society, also a member of 
Corps 29, Women's Relief Corps, G. A. R. 

The beautiful character of her childhood grown to its 
full strength of womanhood has left its impress upon all 
who knew her. Her husband with two children Charles 
A. and Flora B. survive her. 



ARTHUR SCUDDER MOORE 

"Was born in Lynn, February 4, 1856, and died June 24, 
1902. He was the son of Abner Scudder and Susan Dole 
Moore. His father came to Lynn from Philadelphia and 
was for several years engaged in the shoe business. His 
mother came from Haverhill. He married October 29, 
1884, Helen Rhodes Bancroft, daughter of Thomas F. 
and Abby Ann Bancroft. His wife and four children 
•survive. He was for more than twenty years employed as 
travelling salesman for the Artificial Leather Co. of 








Mi 11 1 IN see /'Pi:/; Mooni:. 



I>YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 39 

Boston. A man of quiet taste, fond of home and family, 
he was connected with few organizations. Loyal to his 
early associations he remained a member of the First Con- 
gregational Society until his death, and until failing health 
prevented, he served on its standing committees. 

In connection with the First Church his interest in 
historical matters manifested itself, and he rendered the 
public an important service. He discovered that the 
beautiful .monument to Rev. Parsons Cooke, D. D., 
Lynn's celebrated preacher was showing the effects 
of time, and that the lot containing it was not suitably cared 
for. He undertook the work of restoration. From men 
and women in all parts of the city whose early associations 
were with the old church and who cherished the memory 
of its t'-reat pastor, he obtained generous contributions of 
funds which enabled him to put both the lot and the monu- 
ment in a condition which make them an attractive feature 
in Pine Grove Cemetery, and worthily perpetuate the 
memory of Dr. Cooke. . By this service Mr. Moore proved 
himself true to the spirit and purpose of the Historical 
Society of which he was one of the earliest members. 



SARAH ELIZABETH (WRIGHT) LAMPER 

Was born in North Chelsea, September 19, 182 1, and 
died in Lynn, July 8, 1902. She was the daughter 
of John and Priscilla (Gardner) Wright. Her father 
was christened in Christ's Church, Boston, and was in 
early life a Unitarian. He afterwards came to Lynn 
and was one of the original members of the Central Con- 
gregational Church, then located on Silsbee street. 
Her mother was born Priscilla Gardner, of Salem and 
her grandfather was Abel Gardner, a ship carpenter, 



40 



T.YXX IIISTORICAI. SOCIETY 



employed by Capt. Derby. It is said that he worked on 
the old Derby mansion, on La Fayette street, Salem. He 
\Yas appointed tirst toll collector at the Chelsea end of 
Mystic bridge. Mrs. Lamper came to Lynn a young 
woman and married William. Alvah Lamper, who died in 
February, 1893. They were married at the home ot" her 
sister, Mrs. Joseph B. Lamper, in New York city, July 
12, 1856, by Rev. Frederick G. Clark, pastor of the West 
23rd street Presbyterian church. Two children were born 
to them, Elizabeth, who died in January, 1887, and Joseph 
A., who survives her. Mrs. Lamper was a woman of 
sterling character, had many iViends, and was for many 
years an active member of the Unitarian Church. 



ELIZABETH HARNEY 

Was born on Market street, Lynn, August 18th, 1848, 
and died July 29, 1902. She was the youngest daughter 
of Mary Rand Johnson, of Salem — a descendant of the 
Johnsons of Hollis, New Hampshire — and George Ballard 
Harney, well knowMi in Lynn as a clothing merchant, 
conducting business for many years, with his brother, 
Henry, on the corner of Market and Liberty streets. He 
died there in 1856. George and Mary Harney had six 
children : — George Edward, an architect, living in New 
York city, left the sole survivor of the family ; Louise ; 
William, who died in infancy : Mary Lucy : Elizabeth 
and Charles Henry, who married Emma Horton, and 
died leayintj no children. 

After the Market street hre of 1868 the family 
removed to Baker street, and here Louise was the tirst to 
pass away. After an interval Charles. Mary Lucy and 
Mrs. Harney died within a few years of each other. 



LYNN HISTORICAL S0CI1:TV. 4I 

Miss Harnev was a member of the North Con^rej^a- 
tional Church, and attended there until after these family 
losses. 

The Harnev family is of French origin, the name 
having the form Harnais ; the branch which went cner 
into England carrying the name through the successive 
changes of Harnais, Erneys, Harneys to Harney. 

The grandfather of George, Ballard II., lived in 
Waterford, Ireland, before the Revolution, and was owner 
of a ship trading with the East Indies. His son, the 
father of George B., who was afterwards Captain Martin 
Harney, studied navigation when quite young, and at an 
early age became sailing master of a ship, and while on a 
voyage to Calcutta, during the embargo, his ship was 
taken for the English service and brought to St. Johns, 
Newfoundland. Here Harney remained in hiding for 
awhile, and then took passage for Salem, Mass. 

For some time he was sailing master for the Boston 
merchant, William Gray — known as "Billy Gray," — trad- 
ing between Salem and the Indies. In 1793 he married 
Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Ephraim Rhodes, of 
Lynn, and sister of Amos Rhodes, Sr. He built the 
house on Market street afterwards occupied by his son 
George. He died in 1843, at the age of 79. 

Captain Martin and Elizabeth (Rhodes) Harney had 
eight children, of whom three died in early childhood. 
Of those who lived to maturity E. Rhodes Harney, the 
oldest, married Elizabeth Harris, of Danvers, and removed 
to Baltimore, where he carried on a successful " Female 
Seminary " for many years. Of their children, Henry 
married Miss Bardett, of Virginia, and lives in New 
York city. He has two daughters. Thomas, the second 
son of Martin and Elizabeth, married and died leaving no 
children. 



42 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Martin Derby, who died September, 1882, married 
Martha Rhodes, who died December, 1876, sister of 
Amos Rhodes, Jr., for man}^ years treasurer of the Lynn 
Institution for Sa^•ings. Their on]y living descendant is 
Martlia Frances, now living on Western avenue of this 
city. George Ballard, whose family has been named, 
died in September, 1856. 

William Henry, who also was once a member of the 
Lynn Historical Society, died unmarried in November, 
1902, nearlv 90 ^^ears of age, and with him has passed 
the last of the original family. 



LUCY TOWNE HOLMES 

Was born in Lynn, December 26, 185 1, and died at Pine- 
hurst, N. C, December 6, 1902. 

She was the youngest child and last surviving mem- 
ber of the famih' of Charles B. and Mary Ann (Smith) 
Holmes. Miss Holmes came from a sea-faring ancestr}' 
on both sides. Her paternal grandfather was Captain 
Thomas Holmes of Salem, who was for many years 
encraired in the famous African trade by which Salem was 
enriched. Of the five sons of Captain Holmes three 
came to Lynn and engaged in business. Charles B. kept 
a dry goods store until his death. John C. was for a time 
engaged in the manufacture of hats with Samuel Mans- 
field. Later he removed to Lansing, Mich. While in 
Lynn he was captain of the Light Infantry. Aaron 
Holmes was a jeweler and early removed to Boston. 

The grandfather of Miss Holmes on her mother's 
side was James Smith, a Scotchman, who, after following 
the sea for some years, finally settled in Salem, where he 



i 




L YD /A com; .\i:al. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOClIiTV. 



43 



married Hannah Harvvood, and where his daughter, Mary 
x\nn, wa!s born. 

The subject of this sketch spent all of her life in 
Lynn, residing in the house in which she was born, on 
North Common street, until a few weeks before her 
death. 

In the early part of her life she was an attendant at 
the First Congregational Church, to which her parents 
were loyally attached. In later ^^ears she was a devoted 
member of St. Stephen's Church, and gave liberally of 
her time and strength to its service. She was especially 
interested in the music, serving as choir-mother for some 
years. Here her ministrations will be greatly missed. 



LYDIA COBB NEAL 

Was born March 26, 1815, at Parsonstield, Maine. She 
died at Lynn, Januar}' 6, 1903. She was the daughter 
of Edward Cobb and Phoebe (Pope) Cobb, and a 
descendant of Henry Cobb, who came from England 
in 1629 to Plymouth, and of Joseph Pope, who came 
to Salem in the "Mary and John " in 1634. Edward 
Cobb joined the Society of Friends when a young man ; 
Phoebe Pope was born a Qriaker ; Lydia Cobb was there- 
fore a birthright member of the Society of Friends, and 
she continued to her death an active member of that 
religious faith. 

She was educated in Portland and for a short time 
taught school there. On September 8, 1836, she married 
Peter Morrell Neal at Portland, according to the Friends' 
ceremony. Mr. Neal w^as at that time a school teacher, 
but in 1849, leaving given up teaching, he came to Lynn 
and entered the lumber business, shortly after building a 



44 I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

house on what was then Beach street ( now Washington 
street) in which he and Mrs. Neal resided at the time of 
her death. 

Mrs. Neal always took an active interest in religious 
and educational matters and in various activities of women 
in the city of Lynn. She was for years on the committee 
of the Friends School at Providence, R. I., and from time 
to time held various positions of trust in the Society of 
Friends. She was one of the charter members of the 
Lynn Woman's Club and at the close of her life was on 
the honorary list of that organization. No woman of 
younger years took a more genuine interest in the various 
activities with which she w^as connected than Mrs. Neal, 
yet her position w^as always a modest one in that she never 
strove for any form of recognition or advancement, and 
while ahvays w'illing to do her share in any work, never 
desired to hold office of any kind. 

Notwithstanding her active interest in all that was 
going on in the cit\' and in the world at large, Mrs. Neal's 
life centered to a remarkable de<iree about her own home. 
It is not given to many people to live together in the mar- 
ried state for sixty-six years. Such was the case, how- 
ever, with Mr. and Mrs. Neal, and in all the years of their 
living together there was that true companionship that 
makes the real home life. Mrs. Neal's interest in her bus- 
band's activities, her wide search after knowledge that 
could be gamed from reading and conversation, and her 
kindly interest in people, young and old, made her, up to 
the time of her death, younger in spirit than many women 
of half her age. 

She died after an illness of less than two weeks. 
Although eight3^-seven years of age, she was, up to the 
time of her last sickness, in the full enjoyment of all her 



LYNX KISTORICAL SOCIETY. 45 

faculties and possessed of the same keenness of intellect 
and graciousness of manner that characterized her in her 
younger da^'s and that made her through her whole life a 
sincere Christian, a faithful wife and a woman much 
beloved among those who knew her. 

Mrs. Neal is survived by her husband Peter Morrell 
Neal. All her descendants survi\e her. They are her 
sons, Edward Cobb Neal and William E. Neal, both of 
Lynn; her daughters, Mary Louise Neal Barney, (wife 
of William Mitchell Barne}-) of Lynn, and Ellen Neal 
Cheney, (wife of John E. Cheney) of Boston; her grand- 
children. Rev. Edward Mitchell Barney of Bradford, 
Penn., Lvdia Louise Barney, and Charles Neal Barney of 
Lvnn, and Herbert Neal Cheney of Boston ; and her great 
grandchild, Josephine Cheney of Boston. Dr. John 
Winslow of Ithaca, N. Y., an adopted son, died several 
^'ears aofo. 



46 I.YNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



The following paper, entitled 



"A CHAPTER IN THE STORY OF THE IRON WORKS," 

Was read by tlie Hon. Nathan M. Hawkes, at a meeting of the 
Society, on Thursday evening, February 7th, 1902. 



Midway between Salem and Boston, the first and second 
capitals of Massachusetts, there flows a serpentine little stream 
called the Abousett by the Indians and the Saugus by their 
English successors. From an elevation it resembles a string of 
"upper-case" letter S's. Tide- water meets the down-flowing 
fresh water two miles from the bay, between Round hill on the 
west and the dark forest on the east. Just where the currents 
lap each other, on the bank of the stream, is a long sloping 
mound like a sea-serpent's back, which to the passerby seems 
but a freak of nature. The hand of man, however, wrought 
that earth-work. At this point was the fording place crossed in 
the early days by Endicott and Winthrop, and all the Puritan 
worthies in the infancy of New England. 

The mound which lies at this point upon the river bank, 
and is known to the natives as "the Cinder Banks," is the 
heaped-up scoria — the refuse, the remainder — the sweepings of 
an iron foundry, which was in full blast before the red man had 
cast his last lingering look upon his beloved river and upon the 
blue waters of the Atlantic beyond. The fleecy snows have 
mantled it, the sun has scorched it for two centiiries, and only 
an occasional curious observer has disturbed its scanty covering 
of vegetation for some relic of the first manufacturing industry 
of the continent. A surpassingly beautiful picture rewards the 
lover of nature who ascends the "pirates lookout" on the oppo- 
site side of the stream. Glancing down the lazy waters, in the 
foreground lie the Nahants and Egg rock, like fair nymphs 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



47 



arising from tiie sea ; near at hand are green forests and nestling 
hamlets; to the right the eye catches the glittering dome of the 
State House ; beyond it the famed Blue hills of Milton; and 
far away on the left, almost mingling with the horizon, are the 
cliffs of Cape Ann. 

Verily, there is nothing new under the sun in the laws of 
nature or of trade. The present large impetus of English capi- 
tal into this country only marks afresh the movement that has 
existed since the very beginnings of the western continent. 
There is something stimulating in the contact of an old race 
with a new soil. English capital was seeking investments when 
the Puritans took possession of Massachusetts Bay. In this 
marvelous age of iron it will be interesting to note a few inci- 
dents in the history of the first iron works in America. 

In the Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society 
for October, 1S92, a diary of John Winthi'op, Jr., with four 
other papers, bearing upon the establishment of the iron works 
and edited by Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., are printed. 

The diary covers parts of November and December, 1645, 
and relates a trip through Massachusetts south from Boston — 
through Braintree among other places — Rhode Island and Con- 
necticut. 

R. C. Winthrop, Jr., says of the first of the manuscripts 
which follow the diary: — "The first of them is a rough draft 
(without date, but probably written in the spring of 1644), in 
which John Winthrop, Jr., narrates his search through Maine, 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts for the fittest place in which 
to establish the iron industry and he gives at length his reasons 
for preferring Braintree." 

Of the third paper he says: — "The third is a letter to Win- 
throp, from his associates in London, in June, 1645, introducing 
Richard Leader, whom they were sending out to superintend 
the works." 

In the notes upon this diary the learned editor says : — 

Early in 1644 the Massachusetts General Court had granted 
3,000 acres of common land at Braintree to John Winthrop, Jr., 



48 I.YXN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

and others, for the encouragement of an iron work to be set up 
about Monatocot river." 

By the Records the only grants made to John Winthrop, 
Jr., during 1644, were, first, Upon the petition of Mr. John 
Winthrop, Jr., exhibited to this Court, for leave to make a 
plantation at or near Pequott, it is ordered, that the said petition 
is granted, & that the petitioner shall have liberty to make a 
plantation in the said Pequott country, with such others as shall 
present themselves to join in the said plantation, & they shall 
enjoy such liberties as are necessary, & other far remote planta- 
tions do enjoy, and also to lay out a convenient place for iron 
works, provided, that a convenient number of fit persons to carry 
on the said plantation do appear to prosecute the same within 
three years. Dated the 28th of the 4th mo., 1644. The second 
grant was under date Nov. 13, 1644 : — 

"Mr. John Winthrop, Jr., is granted the hill at Tautousq, 
about 60 miles westward, in which the black lead is, and liberty 
to purchase some land there of the Indians." 

The only other grant to John Winthrop, Jr., near this time 
was dated May 10, 1648, and relates to him as a prospector of 
salt mines, instead of iron works, and the land was in the terri- 
tory conquered from the Indians far from Braintree. 

"The Court hath agreed that 3,000 acres of land shall be 
granted to John Winthrop, Junior, of the Pequot land, at 
Paquatuck, near to the Narraganset country ; provided, that if 
he set not up a considerable salt work — we mean to make one 
hundred ton per annum of salt, between the two capes of Mas- 
sachusetts Bay within three years now next coming, — then this 
grant to be void; provided, also, that the said land fall within 
the division of the part of the Pequod country belonging to this 
jurisdiction, provided the 3,000 acres be laid out together in one 
place, & the former agreement with him in the country's behalf 
is hereby repealed." 

Early and late writers upon the first iron works in America 
discuss the matter as if there was a dispute as to the priority 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



49 



between Lynn and Braintree. It may be worth while to give 
some chronological and other data. 

A memorandum made in "The records of the Governor 
and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England," 
under date of March 2, 1628-9, while preparations were making 
in England for the planting of the colony is indicative of a pur- 
pose and is the first mention of the iron works question. It is 
as follows : — 

"Also for Mr. Malbon, it was propounded, he having skyll 
in iron works and willing to put in £25 in stock, it should 
be accepted as £50 and his charges to be borne out and home 
for New England ; and upon his return and report what may be 
done about iron works, consideration to be had of proceeding 
therein accordingly, and further recompense if there be cause to 
entertain him." 

John Malbon's name appears a few days later on the rec- 
ords when he desired to be present for a conference with regard 
to his proposition and We hear no more from him. 

Evidently he failed to agree with the company and did not 
adventure with the colonists. 

There is no occasion to get into a controversy as to which 
was first, the egg or the hen — Lynn or Braintree. 

The historical writers were not careful enough in reading 
the recorded facts relating to the undertaking — hence a seeming 
not real question as to the priority between the two places. 

James Savage, the erudite editor of Gov. VVinthrop's his- 
tory, says in a note, Vol. 2, page 314, "Johnson Lib. III., C 6, 
takes notice of the investment by tlie English undertakers in the 
work at Braintree, but though more full, he is little more satis- 
factory than Mr. Hubbard. Neither of these writers mentions 
but one place, so that from Hubbard we should learn nothing of 
Braintree forge, nor from Johnson of Lynn. From some pow- 
ers of attorney given in by the London undertakers, preserved 
in the Suffolk registry. Vol. 3, 155, I find the interest was the 
same in both places." 

This note of Mr. Savage gives a key to the mystery. 



50 LYNN HISTORICAI> SOCIETY. 

vSo far as the records and the evidence go the scheme to 
make iron in the colony remained quiescent till 1642. From 
that time there was a livel}' agitation. 

Readers of the Colonial Records and of the Suffolk Deeds 
will readily ascertain that there was only one company of under- 
takers for the iron works and that was the London Company 
interested by the efforts of Capt. Robert Bridges of Lynn, and 
John Winthrop, Jr. 

In a note Vol. 2, page 237, Winthrop's History, Savage 
says of Capt. Robert Bridges, "Johnson lib. II c. 26 speaks of 
his ability and good disposition to serve the public. He was a 
freeman 2 June 1641, went home next year but came again I 
find in 1643, with J. Winthrop, Jr., and in the three following 
years was a deputy for Lynn. Having served in 1646 as 
Speaker, he was elevated to the rank of Assistant next year, and 
continued in the ofiice till his death in 1656. Probably the 
interest in the iron works, with which he was inspired by Win- 
throp, was the cause of his coming to our country." 

The General Court of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay in 
New England on March 7, 1643-4, P'^nsuant to its liberal policy 
in aiding schemes for the growth of new industries answered 
certain questions of the Iron Works Company. 

To the first proposition of the company the court responded 
by granting a Monopoly of Manufacture for twenty-one years. 

To the fifth proposition, which was if waste places would 
be granted, the court replied, "It is granted, provided they take 
not above six places, and do within ten years set up an iron fur- 
nace forge in each of the places and not a bloomery only, pro- 
vided the' court may grant a plantation in any place where the 
Court thinketh meet, which may not hinder their present pro- 
ceeding." 

Capt. Edward Johnson, of Woburn, wrote a book which 
purported to be "A History of New England, from the English 
Planting in the yeare 162S until the yeare 1652." It was first 
published anonymously in London in 1654. It is better known 
to bibliographers under the title "Wonder- Working Providence 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 5 1 

of Sions Saviour in New England." Johnson's book was the 
result of journeys through the colony and consists largely of the 
planting of the churches with descriptions of the industries and 
ways of living of the people. In his account of Lynn he says^ 
"There is also an Iron Mill in constant use, but as for Lead they 
have tried but little yet." So that Mr. Savage was in error, and 
Johnson had discovered the doings at Lynn. 

Goodwin in "The Pilgrim Republic," page 527, says: — In 
1645 Iron Works were set up at Lynn, but were soon closed 
through the reasonable fear of the people that the demand for 
charcoal would consume the scanty supply of wood. 

Another trial was made at Braintree, and in 16^6 Dr. Child 
there produced some tons of cast-iron "pots, mortars, stoves and 
skillets." 

The latest writer of the story of the planting, Daniel Wait 
Howe, in his book, "The Puritan Republic," in the chapter on 
Industrial and Commercial Life, page 133, says : — A pottery 
was established at Salem in 1641 and iron works at Lynn in 
1643, but the latter were abandoned." 

Dr. W. S. Pattee, in his history of Braintree, in the chap- 
ter on Iron Works, page 460, says, "The greater part of the- 
capital and principal business was at Lynn, as at the time of the 
failure of the iron compan}' the apprizements of their estate at 
Lynn amounted to £3295 2s. 6d. and at Braintree £666 3s. 3d." 

We may add that it appears by Suffolk Deeds Liber. II.,. 
pages 265 to 372, that the judgment creditors, they being Rob- 
ert Burgis, Nicholas Potter, John Tarbox, Joseph Mansfield, 
John Hawthorne, Edward Baker, Daniel Salmon, Thomas- 
Wiggins, William Tingle, John Hill, and Joseph Armitage- 
were all of Lynn. 

All the judgments were had at the Salem court. Under the- 
executions there issued the defendants are named as "Mr. John 
Bee & Company, undertakers of the Iron Workes at Lynne." 

One parcel levied upon is described "by grant from the 
Towne of Boston was seized of Two thousand eight hundred 
& Sixty acres of land at Braintry." 



52 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Other property of the company was levied upon in Boston 
and in Lynn, but the citations given above plainly show that 
though the company had lands in different localities as allowed 
by the General Court, the seat, the centre, of the works was at 
-Lynn. 

Dr. Pattee, page 457, says : "It is useless for us to go over 
the extensive field of controversy in reference to whether Lynn 
or Braintree erected the first iron forge in America. It is of 
little moment to us whether Lynn or Braintree began their 
works one or six months previous to the other, as they were one 
and the same company, and most probably their works estab- 
ilished as near together as the nature of the circumstances would 
admit. We are, however, of an opinion that the evidence pre- 
dominates to Lynn. Still, it is an open question, and we think 
will ever remain as such." 

Dr. Pattee goes on to say : "The first branch forge and 
furnace, for the manufacture of iron ware in America (as it was 
one branch, the other having been built at Lynn by the same 
company), was constructed in that part of Braintree which is 
now called Quincy, on what has ever been known as Furnace 
brook." 

And ever since the Braintree writers have disputed as to 
where their forge was. That is their controversy, not ours. 
We know where our pond, canal, works and forge were. 

The grant of nearly 3,000 acres in Braintree was made by 
the Town of Boston of its common lands to the Iron Works 
Company, and was recorded in Suffolk deeds. Liber. L, page 
73. This conveyance was confirmed by the Selectmen of Bos- 
ton on the 33d of 9 month, 1647. 

One conveyance to the Company of Undertakers of the Iron 
Works, or to Richard Leader, agent, of land in Braintree, was 
the first recorded transaction, as appears in Suffolk deeds. Liber 
I, page 62. This was the George Ruggles land, and the con- 
veyance was dated September 29, 1645, 

It may be of interest to copy another instrument which 
4intedates the others and gives a description of the land where 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



53 



the great iron works experiment was substantially tried by 
Leader and Bridges and later by John Gifford. "Thomas Dex- 
ter, of Linne, granted unto Richard Leader of Boston, Mercht. 
Agent for a certaine Company of Undertakers for an Iron 
works & in their behalf (in consideration of XXXX£ sterl. in 
hand payd.) All that parcell of land neere adjacent to the 
Grantors house, wch shall necessarily be overflowed by reason 
of a pond of water there intended to be stopped unto the height 
agreed on betwixt them, and also convenient land & sufficient 
for a water course intended to be erected together with the land 
lyeing betvveene the ould water course & the new one. As also 
fyve Acres & halfe in the Cornefield next the Grantors house & 
most convenient for the uses intended, & twoe convenient Cart 
wayes, one on the one syde of the bargained premises, & 
another on the other syde thereof. And this was an absolute 
deed of sale with cause of warranty; And the said Rich. 
Leader, in behalfe of his principalis, did grant that all the pur- 
chased premises in convenient season be fenced from the Gran- 
tors lands with a sufficient fence to be made & maintained for 
ever at the charge of the said Company of Undertakers, as also 
to make & maintaine towards Capt. Bridges house, & one at the 
out bounds of Tho. Dexters land goeing to the Towne Comon, 
& to make & maintaine a sufficient Cart bridge over the said 
water course out of the lands of the Grantor through some part 
of tlie purchased premisses unto the other part of his [71.] 
Lands to his use & benefit ; & yearely forever, throughout the 
second & third months to allow sufficient water in the ould 
River for the Alewives to come to the wyres before the 
Grantors house. And what soever trespass shallbe done by any 
beast estrayeing through the said Gates or fences, in the 
Grantors Corne fields, the said Grantee for himself & princi- 
palis doth covenant to make good unto the Grantor uppon Just 
Demand." And this was by Indenture of sale, dated XXVII of 
the Xlth month, 164^. And acknowledged before Mr. Endicot 
VJth 1°, 1645. ^ 

[Suffolk Liber i, 70, 71.]', 



54 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Wherever the iron works are mentioned, as for example, 
in a conveyance from Joseph Armitage, of Lynn, to Captain 
Thomas Savage, Suffolk Deeds, Liber 3, page 3, they are 
described as "ye Iron Workes at Lynne and Braintry." In the 
same volume, pages 137 and 138, is a release from William 
Payne to Henry Webb, of interest in the iron works in New 
England, in which the property is described as at Lynn and Brain- 
tree in New England, showing that though the company had 
liberty to take land in other places these two were the only ones 
taken. 

At the time of Paine's death he was owner of three-fourths 
of the title in common with others, the whole being under the 
supervision of Oliver Purchess. By his will he gave this inter- 
est to his son John, adding the following clause: — "And I do 
hereby earnestly request Mr. Oliver Purchis to be helpful to my 
son John concerning the Iron Works and the accounts thereof, 
whose abilities and faithfulness I have had experience of, into 
whose care I do commit the said accounts." The title subse- 
quently passed from John to Mr. Appleton, though not till after 
a long lawsuit. 

Lender date of 167S, Mr. Lewis writes: — "This year, 
Samuel Appleton, Jr., took possession of the Iron Works by a 
grant in the will of William Payne, of Boston." 

Mr. Lewis and the author of the Paine Genealogy do not 
agree and these differing statements are a fair sample of the dif- 
ficulties that beset those who in local history look for accuracy. 

In 165 1, Richard Leader, agent of the Iron Works Com- 
pany, had proved himself persona non grata to Governor Endi- 
cott, the General Court and the church at Lynn. He went 
home and John Gifford succeeded him as agent for the under- 
takers. From thence, on, the colony records teem with what 
the side notes call "Iron Works disputes." 

In 1654, Mr. Gifford appears to have been at odds with the 
company. Noted names appear in the proceedings. On Sep- 
tember 20, of that year, "Captain Keane (Robert Keayne) and 
Mr. Edward Hutchinson, attorney for Mr. Josiah Winslow, 



f 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. :^ :; 

deputies and attorneys for the undertakers of the iron works, 
plaintiff, and Mr. John Gifford, late agent to the undertakers of 
the iron works, defendant," appear before the General Court, 
which undertakes to solve many questions, such as whether Gif- 
ford was agent of the company — his liability to the company. 

Richard Bellingham was Governor of the colony. Increase 
Nowell was the first assistant and the Court had to pass upon 
their right to vote in the case, showing an opinion on the part of 
the members that they were not disinterested. 

John Gifford, on the whole, was the Englishman most 
closely connected with the iron works, who lived and died in 
Lynn. As agent of the London Company he had a checkered 
career, and after the stress of iron works troubles was over, he 
bought a farm and water privilege higher up Saugus river and 
continued the iron works on his own account, at what is now 
Howlett's mill pond, in North Saugus. His house was where 
the Butterfield house is to-day, under the shadow (unless the 
railroad people have destroyed them) of the great trees on the 
way to Wakefield. 

Gifford's life deserves more notice from local historians 
than can be given here. He cast his lot with us and his 
descendants are numerous in Lynn and Essex county. Among 
the papers recorded in Suffolk Deeds, Liber. 3, page 155, is a 
power of attorney, acknowledged before "Sir Robert Tich- 
borne. Knight, Lord Mayor of the Cittie of London & the 
Aldermen or Senators of said Cittie," in which he is described 
as John Gifford, of the Parish of Allhallowes Barking, Lon- 
don, merchant, aged thirty-four years or thereabouts. This 
paper was executed at the Guild Hall, of London, on the first 
day of September, 1657. 

On November 28th, 1654, the creditors named elsewhere 
obtained judgment against the Iron Works Company, and levied 
upon all the property of the concern. Curiously enough these 
judgments were had before Capt. Robert Bridges, whose close 
connection with the affairs of the company would in modern 
days have debarred him from sitting in the cases. 



S^6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Within a year, or about January, 1655, all the ci-editors had 
sold their interest in the seized property to Capt. Thomas Sav- 
age, of Boston, a Colonial dignitary and a member of the Gen- 
eral Court. (See Suffolk Deeds, Liber. 2, pages 265 to 272.) 

In 1657 the adventurers were plainly of opinion that they 
had been deluded by the people of the colony as to the doings of 
Mr. Gifford. The other adventurers made a power of attorney 
to one of their number, John Becx. An indenture was signed 
August 25, 1657, to which the parties were John Becx, repre- 
senting the London Company, and John Gifford. We may 
make extracts from this old time paper to show how fully Gif- 
ford had regained the confidence of the company. At this 
time, owning to mismanagement, or misfortune, the property or 
its title had passed into the hands of Captain Savage. 

"Whereas, the actings and proceedings of the said John 
Gifford, who was formerly employed and authorized by the said 
John Becx and divers other, the said adventurers and co-part- 
ners touching and concerning the said Iron Works in New 
England aforesaid, were by certain persons there then inhabiting 
misrepresented unto the said John Becx and them the said 
adventurers who giving credit there unto were seduced and 
thereby induced to countermand his further agency in and con- 
cerning the premises, and thereupon to impower, intrust and 
imploy certain persons of New England, namely, Capt. Robert 
Bridges, of Lynn, Capt. William Ting, of Boston, Henry 
Webb and Joshua Foote, of the same, and afterwards Capt. 
Robert Keayne, and Josias VVinslow, of Boston, aforesaid in 
New England deputies and attorneys for and on the behalf of 
the said John Becx and other the said adventurers and copart- 
ners touching the premises, who did not pursue the directions to 
them the said deputies and attorneys in and by ye several writ- 
ings or letters of attorney to them in yt behalf given and 
granted, which tended to the great prejudice and damage of the 
said adventurers, and copartners in their interests and estates, in 
and to the premises. Now this indenture witnesseth that the 
said John Becx as well by force and virtue, of the said recited 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. z^J 

writing and letter of attorney, and the power therein to him in 
that behalf granted as aforesaid, or other wise upon his own 
interest doth by these presents for and on the behalf of liimself, 
and the said other adventurers and copartners utterly revoke 
make null and void the said writing or letter or letters of attor- 
ney, formerly made or granted touching or concerning the said 
Iron Works to them the said Capt. Robert Bridges, Capt. Rob- 
ert Ting, Henry Webb, Joshua Foote, Capt. Robert Keayne, 
and Josias Winslow^ or any of them or to any other person or 
persons other than to the said John Gifford, and thereupon the 
said John Becx, by virtue of the said power and authority to 
him granted as aforesaid, hath again intrusted, constituted^ 
authorized, deputed, and made, and by these presents doth 
intrust, constitute, authorize, depute and make the said John 
Gifford, his lawful agent factor attorney and assignee as well for 
him the said John Becx, as for and on the behalf of other ye 
adventurers and copartners, aforesaid by all due and legal ways 
and means to enter into and upon the said Iron Works, iron 
mines, lands, woods, houses, edifices, and buildings with the 
appurtenances thereunto belonging, and to question, examine 
and to call to account all and all manner of person and persons 
whatsoever, who now are or have been any wayes heretofore 
employed, intrusted, interested or related, in unto or concerning 
ye premises or had or have the custody or possession of any the 
iron, iron ore, money, debts, stock or store of cattle, coal,, 
wood, lands, houses, buildings, and other ye good instruments, 
commodities, materials or things whatsoever, of or belonging ta 
the same or any part thereof, and the same premises and every 
or any part thereof ; to receive and take into his hands govern- 
ment regulation and disposals, for and unto the proper use, 
benefit and behoof of the said John Becx, and others the said 
adventurers and copartners, and further to audite, rectify, settle, 
conclude, and finish all reckonings accounts, and dealings 
depending or pretended to be between the said Joim Becx and 
other the said adventurers and co-partners on the one part and 
such other person or persons in New England aforesaid or 



58 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

elsewhere, on the other part, as are in any wise concerned in the 
premises. And further the said John Becx doth by these pres- 
ents, for himself and the said other adventurers and copartners, 
give and grant to the said John Gifford full power and authority 
all and every ye person and persons, witholding or detaining of 
the said goods and premises, and denying upon demand, to 
make delivery thereof or any part thereof, unto the said John 
Gifford, for him the said John Becx, and in his name and in ye 
name or names of all or any, or as many of the said adventurers 
and copartners as shall be thought fit, to arrest, attach, sue, 
impead, imprison, condemn, and out of prison to deliver, 
release, acquaint, and discharge by writing or otherwise." 

See Suffolk Deeds, Liber 3, pages 159 and 160. 

For the purpose of throwing light upon the activity of the 
business a deposition found in the Quarterly Court files at 
Salem, dated June 37, 1671, is herein giv-en : — "John Poule, 
aged about forty-five years, sworne, saith, that living with Mr. 
Samuel Bennett, upon or about the time that the Iron Works 
were seased by Capt. Savage, in the yeare 53 as 1 take it, for I 
lived ther several years, and my constant employment w^as to 
repaire carts, coale carts, mine carts, and other working mater- 
ials for his teenies, for he kept 4 or 5 teemes, and sometimes 6 
teemes, and he had the most teemes the last yeare of the Iron 
• Works, when they were seased, and my master Bennett did 
yearly yearne a vast sum from the said Iron Works, for he com- 
monly yearned forty or fifty shillings a daye for the former time, 
and the yeare ^3, as aforesaid, for he had five or six teemes 
goeing generally every faire daye." 

As if it were not enough for Gifford himself to be in hot 
water all the time his wife Margaret, an estimable woman, was 
complained of by Dr. Philip Read, of Lynn, as being a witch. 

The complainant said, "he verily believed that she was a 
witch, for there were some things which could not be accounted 
for by natural causes." Mrs. Gifford gave no regard to her 
summons, and the court very prudently suspended their 
inquiries. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 59 

The time had not come for the madness of 1692, which 
was prolific of individual misery. Yet to the credit of Mas- 
sachusetts let it be said that here was broken the spell of demon- 
ology which had up to that time held in chains the whole 
Christian world. 

GifEord seems to have been a scapegoat for the sins of 
people whom the authorities of the colony could not reach, even 
beyond the biblical account (Leviticus 16: 10), for after he had 
escaped to the wilderness of the upper Saugus he was perse- 
cuted and prosecuted and imprisoned for the obligations of the 
company. He was released from imprisonment by the General 
Court in May, 1656, at the request of the London urdertakers. 
Many years later, October 15, 1684, he presented to the court a 
petition relating that "he hath now been a prisoner upon execu- 
tion fower yeares and seven months" in a matter in which the 
principals were dead and the attorney declined further interfer- 
ence, whereupon "The court, having weighed the necessitous 
and perishing condition of the prisoner, with other considera- 
tions, doe hereby, and declare, that, unless sayd Walters, or 
some other in behalfe of sayd principall, doe, within ten dayes, 
appear and give caution to the keeper for the discharge of the 
prisoners, and other necessaries for the relieife of the sayd 
prisoner, the secretary shall grant his warrant to the keeper for 
his release, he, sd Gifford paying prison ffees and charges then 
due." 

Then the name of Gifford disappears from the colony rec- 
ords. Let us trust that his later years were serenely passed in 
the vale of Saugus, where he could watch the morning sun gild 
Castle Hill, while its evening rays were refiected in the glisten- 
ing waters of the pond with which his life's labors were associ- 
ated. 

May 25, 1700. John Cogswell, of Chebacco Parish, Ips- 
wich, and his wife, Margaret (Gifford) Cogswell, conveyed to 
Timothy Wiley and Thomas Hawkes, that part of the farm 
"Lying where my honored father, John Gifford's iron works, 
stood." 



6o LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

This conveyance of 73 acres embraced the Howlett's mill 
property and the land which a generation ago was the William 
Edmands farm. 

March 3, 1702-3. John Cogswell and his wife, Margaret, 
conveyed the remainder of "Gifford's farm" to John Brintnall. 
This covered 177 acres and was what, of late years, is known 
as the Butterfield farm, and ran up to what is now the boundary 
line of Saugus and Lynnfield. 

The witnesses to the last conveyance were Moses Hawkes, 
Thomas Hawkes and Thomas Cheever. 

The deeds may be found in Essex deeds. Book 14, page 54, 
and Book 15, page 124. 

Various reasons are given to account for the failure of the 
enterprise, such as hostility of land owners, fear of using up the 
forests for charcoal, inadequate capital. But there was some- 
thing else. There was a constant friction between the foreign 
and home management. The people of the colony thought they 
ought to regulate affairs, and the people who furnished the 
capital inclined to think that they could direct the expenditure of 
their own money. Another stumbling block was the distressing 
fact that some of the agents and employees of the company 
slighted their privilege of going to meeting. 



LYNN HISTORICAI. S0CIF:TV. 6i 



Members of Lynn Historical Society 

To July I, 1903. 



April 2"]. 1897- Abbott, Waldo Lovejov 25 IIano\LT St. 

" Aborn, Charles Henry . 130 Atlantic Ave., Swanipscott 

" Adams, Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

Ocf. 20, 190J. Albree, John, Jr 279 Humphre\ St., Swampscott 

Ma re k 26, 1901. Aldworth, Eliza A 394 Walnut St. 

July 29, 1901. Allen Eliza M • • • • ■ 2 Walden St. 

May 19, 1903. Allen. Frank D 46 King's Beach Ter. 

Jan. 2'^, 1S98. Allen. Lillie B 120 South Common St. 

May ig, 1903. Allen, Lucy R 46 King's Beach ter. 

^/;v7 27, 1S97. Allen Walter B 2 Walden St. 

Ocl. 20, 1902. Alley, Addie H i Chestnut Ave. 

Or/. 12, 1901. *Alley, Emma R Boston 

Dec. 16, 1902. Amory, Augustine Heard .... 80 South Common St. 

. •' Amory. Elizabeth T 80 South Common St. 

J/tlv 28, 1902. Arrington, Alfred A 44 Rockaway St. 

,/r^;/. 27. 1902. Atkins, Annie J 157 Euclid Ave. 

Atkins, P'rank W 157 Euclid Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Attwill, x\lfred Mudgc 19 Kensington Sq. 

Jm/e 16, 1902. Attwill Louis Hulcn 134 Myrtle St. 

.•l/;v7 27, 1S97. Atwood. Luther S Sagamore St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Babcock, Bessie B 48 Breed St. 

April 2-], iSc)']. Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2641 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111. 

April 27, 1897. Baker. Frederick E 189 Lewis St. 

3/rt/T// iS, 1S99. Baker. Harry Mudge 115 Ocean St. 

vSe//. 30, 1901. Baker, Lydia Maria 1 12 Johnson St. 

yJ/«;-c// 18, 1899 Baker, Lynette Dawes n:; Ocean St. 

^e//. 30, 1 90 1. Baker, William Ezra 1 12 Johnson St. 

.1/f?;T// 12, 1900. Barker, Ralph E. 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1897. liarney, Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

Barney. William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

I'.arry. John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

(^r/. 28, 1901. P.arry. William J 23 Tudor St. 

Jan. 28, 1S98. Bartlett. Ella l>oak ''i -Vtlantic St. 



62 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

0(7.18,1897. Bartlett. Hannah H ii5NahantSt. 

J(ui. 28, 1898. Bai-tlett, John S 61 Atlantic St. 

April 2\, 1902. Bauer, Fannie M 35 Grosvenor Park 

Bauer, Ralph S 35 Grosvenor Park 

June I, 1897. Beal, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

MiircJi 26, 1901. Beard, Cordelia ]\L E 389 Essex St. 

il/rt/r// 26, 1901. Beard. Daniel Breed 3S9 Essex St. 

March 8, 1901. Bennett, George Edwin 44 Ireson Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Bennett, Josiah Chase Lynn 

" Bennett. Larkin Everett 12 A\on vSt., Wakefield 

Jiiii. 21 . 1899. Berrv, Benjainin Ilun 23S Ocean St. 

Jidii' 9, 1899. Berry. John W 105 Franklin St. 

•' Berry, Susannah \V 105 Franklin St. 

Morcli 2j. 1900. Bessom, William B. .' 44 Elsmere Place 

Orf. 28, 1901. Billings, Edward Baker 103 Liberty St. 

Nov. 24, 1897. Bliss, George S 11 Light St. 

April 21 , 1897. Bliss. Mary Gerry Brown 11 Light St. 

Oc/. 28, 1898. Blood, Eldredge II 157 Maple St. 

March 8, 1901. Brainard Albion Hale 53 Nahant St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Breed. Adelaide L 17 Nahant St. 

Dec. 28, 1899. Breed. Caroline A 22 Atlantic St. 

Mdrrh 26, 1901. Breed, Charles Orrin 54 Elm St. 

Ocf. II, 1899. Breed, Clara E 40 Nahant Place 

Jinic I, 1S97. Breed, Emma Hawthorne 114 Green St. 

April 26, X900. Breed, Florence L 22 Breed St. 

No-\ 28, 1899. Breed, Frances Tucker 52 Baltimore St. 

Oct. II, 1899. Breed, Frank M 40 Nahant Place 

No?'. 28, 1899. Breed, George Albert 52 Baltimore St. 

April 21 , 1S97. Breed, George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

March 27, 1900. Breed, George Herschel 40 Nahant Place 

April 22, 1903. Breed, Hannah P 19 High St. 

.^/;v7 27, 1897. Breed, Henry W 48 Nahant St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Breed, Isabel Morgan 114 Green St. 

April 2*], 1897. Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Nahant St. 

March 26, i()Oi. Breed, Lilla M 54 Elm St. 

Fch. 9, 1899. Breed, IMary E 47 Commerial St. 

April 22, 1903. Breed, Nathaniel P 4 Washington Sq. 

Not. 25, 1901. Breed, Richard 4S4 Summer St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Breed, S. Estelle iiS Green St. 

April 21 . 1897. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

" Breed, Stephen Lovejoy 15 Newhall St. 

" Breed, Warren Mudge 22 Breed St. 

March iS, 1S99. Bresnahan, Maurice V 128 Chestnut St. 



LVNN HISTORKAl. SOCIKTV. 63 

April 21, iS97,*Bi-igh;im, Frank V 17 Franklin St. 

Sept. 30, 1901. Brown, Bethany S 83 (Jreen St. 

" Brown, Kate M S3 Green St. 

April 27, 1897. Bubier, Frederick L J3 La P'ajette Park 

Dec. 30, 1901 Bubier, Harriet Athcrlon 5 Bassett St. 

April 27, 1897. Bubier, Harriott Mudge 1S5 Franklin St. 

May 19, 1903. Bubier, Helen P 213 Boston St. 

April 2^, 1S97. Bubier. Joanna Attwill 17J Washington St. 

April 27, 1897. Bubier, Mary A 54 Bassett St. 

" Bubier, Mary Adelaide 23 La Fayette Park 

Dec. 30, 1901. Bubier, M. Nellie 23 La Fayette Park 

April 2^. 1897. Bubier, Nathan G Swampscott 

" Bubier, Samuel Arthur 54 Bassett St. 

" Bubier, Sylvester H.. 2ii . . . . . . 172 Washington St. 

" Buffum, Charles 450 Union St. 

March 18. 1899. Buker, Frank Emery 9 Salem Place, Maiden 

April 2^, 1897. Bulfinch, Charles F 184 Lewis St. 

" Burrill, Abby M 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, John Irving 23 Nahant Place 

" Burrill, William A 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, William Stocker 23 Nahant Place 

April 2(), 1901. Burrows, Helen 1 90 Ocean St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Burrows. Joseph E 90 Ocean St. 

Feb. 16, 1903. Buzzell. Mary C 49 La Fayette Park 

April 21, 1902. Caldwell. Elizabeth W 52 Cherry St. 

March 26, 1901. Caldwell, Sarah M. N 21, Caldwell Crescent 

Ocf. 28, 1901. Callahan, Julia F 21 Ilolyoke St. 

Jan. 19, 1903. Canniffe, Mary Elizabeth 118 Green St. 

" Carleton, E. Florence 10 Lewis Place 

Sept. 2,0, 1901. Carswell, J. Warren 47 Broad St. 

April 21, 1897. Chace, Maria Rachel 185 Franklin St. 

" Chadvvell, George II 192 South Common St. 

jFel>. 2. 1901. Chase, Alice P 47 Baltimore St. 

March 12, 1900. Chase, Ellen S -4 ^''lii^^^ St. 

Chase, Frederick S -=4 Chase St. 

.l/r/7 27, 1897. Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

Clark, Charles Edward 89 Broad St. 

.SV'//. 30, 1901. Clough, Abbie M 60 Cherry St. 

. I/;-// 27, 1897. *CIough, Charles Bartleti 60 Cherry St. 

Clough, Harriet Kelley -:.^3 Ocean St. 

March 24, 1902. Clough, Martha Elizabeth 2'6 Baltimore St. 

^//'/7 27, 1897. Clough. Micajah Pratt '• . 253 Ocean St. 



64 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



March 34, 1902. Clough, Orville A 28 Baltimore St. 

March 26, 1901. Cobb, Bessie Brown 10 Nahant St. 

Cobb. Carokis M lo Nahant St. 

March 8, 1901. Colburn, Clifton So Nahant St. 

Oct. 20. 1902. Collins, Timothy A i Union St. 

Ocf. 12, 1901. Comej, Augusta W 112 Green St. 

Oc/. II, 1S99. ComeVr Henry Newton 112 Green St. 

Oct. 26, 1900. Conner, Adalaide M 27 Sagamore St. 

Dec. 16, 1902. Covell, Arthur J Si Laighton St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Cox, Frank P 211 Ocean St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Cox, May Vaughan 211 Ocean St. 

Dec. 16, 1902. Creighton, Ella S 142 Washington St. 

April 2-], 1897. Cross, Alfred 14 Chase St. 

•' Cross, Charles A 8 Chase St. 

March 27, 1900. Currier, Benjamin W 13 Deer Cove 

April 26, 1900. Darcw Alice M 54 Commercial St. 

April 27, 1897. Darcy, John W 54 Commercial St. 

July 28, 1899. Davis, Lydia C 34 Baltimore St. 

Jan. 10. 1903. Delnow, Merrill Fillmore 423 Summer St. 

June 16, 1902. Demerest, David 36 Sachem St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Didham, Sarah Barter 112 Hollingsworth St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Dorman, William E 157 Ocean St. 

March 18, 1899. Dunn, Anna Lincoln 22 Portland St. 

March 8, 1901. Durland, Henrietta S3 Chestnut St. 

Feb. 9. 1899. Dwyer, Elmer F 34 Maple St. 

April 22, 1903. Earl, Georgia K 12 Tudor St. 

April 2'], 1897. Earle, Anthony no Henry Ave. 

Earle, Louise Snow no Henry Ave. 

March 18, 1899. Earle, Mabel no Henry Ave. 

June 15, 1903. Eilenberger, Edgar 107 Vine St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Emerson, Anna E 205 Ocean St. 

" Emerson, Henry P 205 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22, 1S97. Emerson, Philip 9 Beede Ave. 

Jan. 27. 1902. Emery, Mar^- E. B 17 Churchill Place 

Dec. 30, 1902. Farquhar, John M 17 Nahant St. 

April 2"], 1897. Faulkner, Walter () 33 Endicott St. 

March 12, 1900. Fenton, Michael Angelo 740 Boston St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Filene, Fannie <')28 \\'estern Ave. 

./an. 10, 1903. Flanders, Wendell Phillips . . . 350 W. jyth St., N. \' . 

Nor-. 17, 1902. Flint, Anna S Lym 

?^lint, Frank E Lvnn 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 65 

Feb. 24, 1902. Foster, Susan M i--^ Union St. 

July 38, 1899. French, Hartwell S i Atlantic St. 

Sept. 15, 1902. Fry, James Bojce . Greenville, N. H. 

April 2^, 1897. Fuller, Addie G 26 Vine St. 

" Fuller. Charles Sylvester 26 Nine St. 

" Galloupc, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

" Galloupe, L\dla Ellis 13 Park St. 

" Garrison, William Lloyd Boston 

Jan. 27, 1902. Gaj, Charles W 25 Exchange St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Gerry, G. Luella 18 Sachem St. 

J/<iy 28, iSgg. Goldthwait, Martha E i8 Portland St. 

April 27, 1897. Goodell, Abner Cheney. Jr 4 Federal St., Salem 

Au£: 18, 1902. Goodell, Addie ,G 4 Broad St. 

fel>. 2, 1901. Goodridge, Charles Sewell 79 Johnson St. 

April 2"/, 1S97. Goodridge, Gertrude May 5 Prescott Place 

March 12, 1900. Goodwin, Daniel W 92 Kewhall St. 

Jan. 10, 1903. Goodwin, Mary Carr 92 Newhall St. 

Feb. 24, 1902. Goodwin, Joseph W 8 Burchstead Place 

" Goodwin, Martha S 8 Burchstead Place 

Jan. 27, 1902. Gordon, Fred A 367 Broadway 

Dec. 24, 1898. Gove, William H 254 La Fayette St., Salem 

April 27, 1897. Graham, George Herbert 5 Seaside Terrace 

May 19, 1902. Graves, Helen E 169 Western Ave. 

April 2^1, 1897. Graves, Isaiah ui Fayette St. 

Sept. 30, 1901. Green, Charles Maxwell 24 Chase St. 

April 2'], 1S97 Green, Henry Harrison 144 F'ranklin St. 

OcL 20, 1902. Green, Susan Francis 40 Tudor St. 

Dec. 28 1900. Grover Charles S 16 Grovcr St. 

,I//v7 27. 1897. Hacker, Sallie H 201 Ocean St. 

April ^, 1899. Halliday, Marion 35 King's Beach Terrace 

Z-'rr. 28, 1899. Hallowell. Caroline A 42 Hanover St. 

April 2-]. 1S97. Ilannan. Joseph F 36 Rogers Ave. 

" Harmon, Maria B 89 North Common St. 

" Harmon, Rollin E 89 North Common St. 

Harris, Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

A't;-'. 28, 1899. Hastings, Charles 11 163 Ocean St 

Jdii. 2-;. 190J. Hastings, Lucie Ingalls 163 Ocean St. 

April 2j. iSij-j. llawkes, Nathan Mortimer 1 12 .Market St. 

May 20. 1898. *Hawkes, Samuel Saugus 

.-l/;-/7 27, 1897. Hawks, Esther H 16 Newhall St. 

Z>('c. 28, 1900. Hayes, Amy Augusta 43 Eastern Ave. 



66 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Feb. 20, 1900. *Hajes, Elihu B 43 Eastern Ave. 

April 2*], 1897. Heath, Caroline Putnam . . 34S Marlborough St., Boston 

" Heath, Henrj Warren 109 Hollingsworth St. 

July 28, 1899. *Henderson, Abby M 79 Nahant St. 

March 18, 1899. Herbert, George C 17 Chatham St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Herrick, Nellie P 43 Autumn St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Hill, Alfred C 57 Chestnut St., East Saugus 

March 26, 1901. Hill, Charlotte Farnsworth 14 Sachem Terrace 

•' Hill, George Barnum 120 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1897. Hill, Susan T 14 Sachem Terrace 

Dec. 16, 1902. Hills, Charles W 61 Nahant St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hilliard, Alma V 11 New Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 

'• Hilton, Eliza A 16 Henry Ave. 

Feb. 16, 1903. Hitchcock, Eliza J 813 Western x\vc. 

April 21, 1899. Hitchings, James \\' 176 Ocean St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hixon, Lucilla D 65 Baker St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hixon, Warren S 65 Baker St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Hodgdon, Charles Ellsworth 40 Tudor St. 

Jan. 27, 1902, Hoitt, Augusta L 13 Henry Ave. 

April 21, 1902. Holder, Anna N 18 Tap ley St. 

March 27, 1900. Holder, Harriet E 9 Tapley St. 

March 19, 1902. Holder, Langdon H 18 Tapley St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Holder, William C 12 Park St. 

Jiely 28, 1902. Hood', H. Maria 23 Wentworth Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hood, Julia Pond iS Sachem St. 

April 2j, 1897. Houghton, John Clarkson 29 \'ine St. 

Nov. 28, 1S99. Houghton, S. Ellen i Light St. 

April 2^, 1897. Howe, Oliver Raymond 20 Bedford St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Hunt, D. Gage 142 Maple St. 

April 27. 1S99. Huntington, Alice B iSi Allen Ave. 

Die. 14, 1898. Ingalls, Edwin W 98 Laighton St. 

April 27, 1897. Ingalls, Emma F 229 Ocean St. 

" Ingalls, J. Fred 605 Western Avenue 

" Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls, Jerome 229 Ocean St. 

Af<iy 20, 1898. Ingalls, Mary Mower 189 Essex St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Ingalls, Robert Collycr -^t, Commercial St. 

April 7, 1899. Ireson, Samuel S 170 South Common St. 

July 28, 1902. Jackson, Elizabeth A 100 Essex St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. James, Frank M 145 North Common St. 

LcfC. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 67 

Nov. 24, 1897. Johnson, Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

J(i/i. 27, 1902. Johnson, Addie Mabel 179 Ocean St. 

April 1"^, 1S97. Johnson, Andrew Dudley . . . NN'intei- St., East Saugus 

•' Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

" Johnson, David N loi Newhall St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Johnson, Ellen M 35 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

April 2^ , \?><)'] . Johnson, Elliott Clarke 62 Mall St. 

April'], 1899. Johnson, Emma Burt loi Newhall St. 

April 2^], 1S97. Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 

Sepf. 15, 1902. Johnson, Harriette Ellen iS Broad St: 

April 21, 1897. Johnson, Henry .W 98 South Common St. 

April"), 1899. Johnson, Lizzie Bishop 181 North Common St. 

y4/;'// 27, 1897. Johnson, Luther S 226 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22, 1897. Johnson, Lydia Hacker .... Winter St., East Saugus 

Dec. 28, 1900. Johnson, Maria L 62 Mall St. 

April 7, 1899. Johnson, Mary May 226 Ocean St. 

April 2-j, iSg'j. Johnson, Virginia Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

Mov 19. 1902. Johnson, Walter W 61 Newhall St. 

April 2^, 1897. *Keene, Frank 17 Atlantic St. 

March 16, 1903. Keene, George W 10 Grosvenor Park 

A^^oc;. 13, 1899. Keene, William Gerry 11 Prescott Place 

March 18, 1899. Keith, Emma Barnard 34 Nahant St. 

l/f^/x// 26, 1901. Keith, Ira B 34 Nahant St. 

,I/;-/7 27, 1897. Kenney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

,/rt^/. 10, 1900. Kimball, Frank W • . 120 Washington St. 

.1/;-// 27. 1897. Kimball, Rufus 54 Harwood St. 

,/^/;/. 10, 1900. Kimball. Sylvia H 120 Washington St. 

.!/;■// 27. 1897. Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill .\ve. 

Jan. 19, 1903. Lamson, Hannah G i-4 Green St. 

7l/f?/-r// 12, 1900. Lee, Caroline S 13 West Baltimore St. 

Dec. 26, 1900. Lewis, Carrie Shillaber 87 Ocean St. 

May 20. 189S. Lewis, Charles W 14° Lewis St. 

, I//-// 27, 1897. Lewis, Jacob Meek 8 La Fayette Park 

May \(), 1902. Libbey, Olive Augusta 55 Rand St. 

.1//^^'-. 27, 1899. Lincoln, Margaret H 17 Sachem Terrace 

Jan. 27, 1899. Little, Mary F 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

Little, William B 4 Nahant. cor. Broad St. 

April-, 1899. Littlefield, Horatia A 35 Franklin St. 

,4/;-/7 18, 1S9S Littletield. Melissa J. 35 Franklin St. 



68 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Afril 7. 1899. Littlefield, William Bradburj 35 Franklin St. 

Jan. 19, 1903. Logan, Edward Francis iiS Green St. 

" Logan. Margaret Jane 118 Green St. 

Sept. 4, 1900. *Loring, John L 27 \'iolet St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Lovejoy, Alice L 64 Broad St. 

Aug. 26, 1901. Lovering. Mary Adelaide S Portland St. 

May 20, 1898. Lummus, Henry Tilton 4 Hudson St. 

April 2(3. 1900. Lummus, Lucinda M 43 Cherry St. 

April 2*], 1897. Lummus, William W' 43 Cherry St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Lur\ey, Sainuel S 19 Biu-chstead Place 

April i*]. 1897. Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

Mansfield, Perlev B 19 Nichols St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Marsh, Arthur W 249 Chestnut St. 

Marsh. Caleb W 243 Chestnut St. 

Marsh, Clara E 243 Chestnut St. 

Nox\ 23. 1S99. Marsh, George E 12 Ireson Ave 

" Marsh, James M 12 Ireson Ave. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Marsh, Mary E 249 Chestnut St. 

March 8, 1901. Martin, Angie P 388 Summer St. 

March 12, 1900 Martin, Augustus B 17 High Rock Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Martin, George Henry 38S Summer St. 

Jan. 2'], 1899. Martin, James P 24 Sachem St. 

Sepf. 30, 1901. ^L'^rtin. Sadie Woodbury 388 Summer St. 

April 27, 1897. Matthews, Harriet L 42 Hanover St. 

/«//<' I, 1897. McArthur, Annie E 22 Mall St. 

April 26, 1900. Mclntire, Frederick ^L . . 1600 NL;ss. Ave.. Cambridge 

Dec. 30, 1901. Megquier, Abbie E 18 Sachem St. 

March 2^. iScj-j. Merrill, Albert R 9 Henry Ave. 

Merrill, Harriet E. 9 Henry Ave. 

Jan. 29. 1900. Moore. Julia J 72 Fayette St. 

April 2"/. 1897. Moulton, Daniel B 36 Sagamore St. 

Moulton, James T 12 Carnes St. 

Moulton, Katherine R 71 Federal St, 

Mower, Earl Augustus . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

Mower, Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

Mower, Martin V. B 3 Mountain Ave. 

Mvidge, Ann Amelia 84 Green St. 

Mudge, Arthur Bartlett 27 Greystone Park 

Mudge, Pamelia B 115 Green St. 

Mullen, Charles H 26 Sagmore St. 

Mullin, James D 58 Newhall St. 

Mullin, Sarah Abby 58 Newhall St. 



J"/}' ^8, 


1902. 


Jan. 29. 


1900. 


April 27 


,1897 


Dec. 28, 


1900. 


Ocl. 28, 


1901. 


Dec. 28, 


1900. 


Jan. 28, 


1898. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIICTV. 6q 

A/>r/7 2-j, 1S97. Neal, Peter Morrell i27\ahantSt. 

NeaK William E 127 Nahant St. 

,/,n/. 10. 1903 Neelv, Margaret S 16 Rogers Ave. 

Neelv, William A iG Rogers Ave. 

.V<n'. 23, 1899. Neill, Charles F 17 Bassett St. 

Neill, Eliza J 17 Bassett St. 

y^/r// 27. 1897. Newhall, Asa Tarbell 489 Lynnfield St. 

Newhall, Charles Henry . . . . 14 West Baltimore St. 

Apyil i\, 1902. Newhall, Clara A 3 Warren St. 

Jau. 27, 1902 *Newhall, Edward S 34 Ocean Terrace 

Newhall, Emma D 281 Ocean St. 

Dec. 30, 1 901. Newhall, Emma E 24 Foster St.. Saugus Centre 

.V^n-. 23, 1899. Newhall, Frances 11 10 Deer Park 

Feb. 20, 1900. Newhall, P>ancis S .18 Baltimore St. 

March 27, 1900. Newhall, George H 343 Chatham St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Newhall, Guv 57 Silsbee Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Newhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

FcA. 2. 1901. Newhall, Hattie C 23 Atlantic St. 

April 27, 1897. Newhall, Howard Mudge 5 Prescott Place 

Newhall, Israel Augustus 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, James Silver 22 Atlantic St. 

" Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

Newhall, Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

Ja 1/ . 2^ , i()02 . Newhall, Louisa y . . 34 Ocean Terrace 

^/r/7 27, 1897. Newhall. Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

Newhall, Marion Wentworth 22 Atlantic St. 

/r?;/. II, 1899. Newhall, Mary Elizabeth 69 Newhall St. 

April 2'], 1897. Newhall, Sarah EfRe 19 Park St. 

Newhall, Stephen Cyrus 98 Nahant St. 

Dec. 16, 1902. Newhall, Susie F 49 Atlantic Terrace 

April 2'], 1897. Newhall, Terry Arden 69 Newhall St. 

" Newhall, Wilbur Fisk . . 74 Lincoln A\e., East Saugus 

" Newhall, William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

" Nichols, Frank Herbert 410 Summer St. 

" Nichols, Fred Hammond 10 Prospect St. 

April 7, 1899. Nichols, Fred M 15 Essex Court 

April 2-j, 1897. Nichols, Richard Johnson 32 Cherry St. 

Nichols, Thomas Parker ii Prospect St. 

Z)<r. 24, 1898. Northrup, Arthur J 20 Baker St. 

" Northrup, Hattie E 20 Baker St. 

Peb. 2, 1901. Norton, Joseph C 30 Grove St. 

April 7,' 1899. Noyes, Mary A 21,^ Summer St. 



70 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

March 26, 1901. O'Keefe, Mary A 414 Broadway 

April 21, 1897. Oliver, James W 69 High Rock St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Oliver, William T 164 Allen Ave. 

July 2g, 1901. Osborne, Archer Preble 694 ^^^estern Ave. 

March 16, 1903. Osborne, Emma 181 Allen Ave. 

" Osborne, Roy W iSi Allen Ave. 

Jit>ic I, 1897. O'Shea, William 112 Market St. 

Jan. 19, 1903. Packard, P21izabeth Belcher .... 25 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Packard, Leonard Warren 25 Beacon Hill Ave. 

April 2(^, 1900. Parker, Amelia J 37 Phillips Ave. 

Oct. 26, 1900. Parker, Harriet Fitts 28 Lowell St. 

April 2*], 1897. Parker, John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

Jan. II, 1899. Parrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherr^^ St. 

Parsons, Katharine M 106 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1S97. Parsons, Mary A Lynnfield Centre 

" Patten, Frank Warren 370 Summer St. 

" Patten. Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Paul, Dorcas Ellen 20 Bloomfield St. 

April 2"]. 1897. Paul, John M 9 F^arrar St. 

" Paul, Lucy F 9 Farrar St. 

Die. 16, 1902. Pease, Edward L 35 Bassett St. 

" Pease, Lucilla P 35 Bassett St. 

April 27, 1S97. Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

Oct. II, 1S99. Percival, Mary E 79 North Common St. 

April 2^, 1897. Pevear, Henry A 159 Washington St. 

March 10, 1898. Pevear, Mary F 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Jan. 19, 1903. Pevear, Nellie 94 Franklin St. 

April 2"], 1S97. Pevear, Sarah E 159 Washington St. 

Dec. 24, 189S. Pevear. Waldo L 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Fel). 9, 1899. Phillips, Anna Racillia 35 Bassett St. 

April!-. 1897. Phillips, Arthur John 35 Bassett St. 

" Pickford, Anna M 166 Washington St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Pike, Georgianna Scott 29 Breed St. 

April 21, 1897. Pinkham, Emily G 64 Nahant St. 

June 16, 1902. Pond, Carolyn Ashley . . 17 Chestnut St., East Saugus 

Nov. 23, 1899. Pool. Howard F 72 Johnson St. 

Dec. 28, 190C. Pool, Lena B 72 Johnson St. 

April 18, 1898. Porter, Bertha Currier loi P\ayette St. 

Aitff. 36, 1901. Porter, Carrie Childs 40 Nahant St. 

Porter, Charles W 40 Nahant St. 

April 18, 1898. Porter, Margaret Ellen loi Fayette St. 

April 2-. 1897. Porter, Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 7 1 

April 1, \$>'^)f). Prichard, Charles F 17 Sai^ainore St. 

May 19, 1903. Proctor, Ernest L 90 Ueacoii Hill Ave. 

April 21 , 1897. Putnam, Eugene A 86 La Fajette Park 

Putnam, Hannah \' 86 La Fayette Park 

" Richards, James II 72 Fayette St. 

Frh. 9, 1899. Robinson, Elizabeth F 47 Commercial St. 

Jiin. 21, 1902. Robinson, Martha G 19 Walden St. 

Jidtc I, 1897. Robinson, William Pitt 1739 17th St., Washington, D.C. 
M<nch 12. 1900. Rogers, Abraham L. . . .311 West 97th St., New ^'ork 

Rogers, Emmelyn S. . . . 311 West 97th St., New "\'ork 
April 2j, 1S97. Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

Rogers, Henry Warren 30 King St. 

Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 

J/(l\' 28, 1899. Rolfe, Charles E 22 Atlantic St. 

Ro\\ell, Frank B 14 Linwood Road 

April 27, 1897. Rule, Elizabeth E 80 P'ranklin St. 

Altey 20, 189S. Ruppel, Emil F 120 South Common St. 

" Ruppel, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 

S\^oz'. 17. 1902. Russell, Harriett F 25 Atlantic Terrace 

April 22, 1903. Sanborn, Carlotta F 164 Euclid Ave. 

Ja>/. 17, 1900. Sanborn, Charles S 18 King St. 

May 19, 1903. Sanborn, Elmer E 164 Euclid Ave. 

April 2'j, 1S97. Sanderson. Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

April 2-j, 1897. Sargent, William P 151 Chestnut St. 

" Sawyer, Henry A 243 Boston St. 

,/««. 27, 1902. Schlehuber, Alma 38 Estes St. 

April 27, 1897 Sears, Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

J/(ly 28, I CJ02. Seaward. Savandah A 75 Hollingsworth St. 

April 2-/, iSg'j. Sheldon, Chauncey C 49 North Common St. 

/«;/. 27, 1902. Sheldon, Lucinda P Lynntield Centre 

April 2-j. iS(j-j. Sheldon, May L 49 North Common Si. 

il/^n' 3. 1901. Shorey, Martha 11 70 High Rock St. 

Shorey, Susan E 7° High Rock St. 

" Silsbee, Henry 38 Brookline St. 

Dec. 28, igoo. Silsbee, Louise E 118 Green St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Smith Annie B -3- Ocean St. 

April 21, UJ02. Smith, Edward C 60 Tudor St. 

OcA 28, 1901. Smith, Florence E 12 Nichols St. 

Jau. 28, 189S. Smith, Joseph N -!3- Ocean St. 

ZJec. 30, 1901. Smith, Mary Abby 640 Western Ave. 

Sep/. 9, 1898. Smith. Sarah F ^3- Ocean St. 

,/««. 27. 1902. Spalding. Anna H 164 Ocean St 



/ 



I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Jau. 27, lyoi. Spalding, Rollin A 164 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Spinnev, Benjamin 1" 270 Ocean St. 

Spinnev. Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Spinney, Zephaniah II ^2, South Common vSt. 

April 2^1, 1S97. Sprague, Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Sprague, Helen M ... 20 Nichols St. 

April I'-i, 1897. Sprague, Henry Breed . . 33 Walker Road, Swampscott 

Ai(ii\ 26, 1901. Sprague, Laura L 33 Walker Road, Swamp.scott 

Dec. 30, 1901. Stacej, Hannah M 13 Portland St. 

April 7, 1899. Stetson, Helen Louise iS Sachem St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Stevens, Charles G 147 Washington St. 

Marcli 26, 1901. Stevens, Adeline 152 Washington St. 

Z>('c 28, 1900. Stevens. Gertrude W 100 Johnson St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Stevens. Mary B 147 Washington St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Stevens, Maurice A 100 Johnson St. 

April 11. 1903. Stewart, Annie () 141 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Stewart, Samuel Barrett 141 Ocean St. 

jV/t/j 20, 1898. Stimpson, Isabelle Bradforii 24 Sachem St. 

Nov. 24, 1897. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

Dec. 16, 1902. Stone, Fredilyn A 23 Lyman St. 

April 27, 1897. Stone. William 23 Lyman St. 

Oc/". II, 1899. Sweetser, Mary Abhy 55 Baltimore St. 

Jiiii. 10, 1900 Sweetser, Mary Anna . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

.-^/W/ 27, 1897. *Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

Feb. 16, 1903. Symonds, Mary A 57 Nahant St. 

April 2^. 1897. Symonds, Walter E 57 Nahant St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Symonds, Warren L 57 Nahant St. 

April 27, 1S97. Tapley, Amos Preston Boston 

" Tapley, Henry Fuller 280 Ocean St. 

" Taplej', Ida J 2S0 Ocean St. 

April 2"], 1896. Tarbox, James E 445 Walnut St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Teal, Harriet E Nahant Road, Nahant 

Dee. 28, 1900. Tebbetts, Georgiana B 37 Baltimore St. 

Jdii. 17, 1900. Tebbetts, Kate P 21, Wentworth Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Tebbetts, Theodoi-e C 37 Baltimore St. 

Oct. 28, 190 1. Thompson, Fredd O. . 120 P21m\vood Road. Swampscott 

April 21. 1902. Thompson, William D 10 \'iolet St. 

Oct. 20. 1902. Thomson, Elihu . . . 22 Monument Ave., Swampscott 
Thomson, Mar\- L. . . 22 Monument Ave.. Swampscott 

J/i//e I, 1897. Tirrell, Sarah E Canton Ave.. Milton 

J(iH. 27, 1902. Titus, Augusta C 17 Breed St. 

Titus. I. Walton 17 Breed St. 



I^YNN HISTORICAL SOCIKTV. y -. 

Ja>^. uj.ujOT,. Towns, Martha Courtncv . ,,.,-, ^ 

Mayl^,^.JOi. Tozzer, Canic M. . ' ■ ■ . 1 udor M. 

J'",r 15. ,,^0.5. Tripp, Mario Kiu.hardt . ,,0 „ "^ 

^l/.../..7.K,oo. Tripp, ThaxtorN. . . l''""" ^'- 

T, , „ , " Haltiiiioro St. 

lucker, Emma A. . . ,, 11 -u 

r^.A .0.190.. Tufts. LucvR. 44 llam.lton Ave. 

.1' Noptunc St. 

April 2^..^.,^. Tsher. Edward Preston (Jrafton. Mass. 

>^.-.S.„o.. Viall, Charles S 39 HloomHeld St. 

./<",. 2-j. n)02. \ lall. Edith L. . ., , 

/„/,, ,0 ,.. ,, , . lyllaneoek St. 

Ji</y 2b. lyoj \ ,all, Lizzie E. ... „, ,,, ^ , , ^, 

.39 Hloomheld St. 

D'ci6.u)02. Walker. Adelaide E. . . ,>.\v,i- . ^. 

,,00 ,, '-3 ^Vash nirton .St. 

,AA'i.S. ibcjy. Walter. Marv E. .. ^7 >o IV.irie \ v . i^\ ■ m 

T s ,,. " ■ -/-9 1 '•HI le Ave., Chicago, I . 

,A//. II. i,S99. Warner, Ellen L. . . ,nMU- ^ 

.„ ^ , 17 Baltimore St 

Warner, John (i ... ,^ r u- 

/«..io,i903. Watts, Lizzie S. . . ''""'; ^ 

/«.. 19. 1903. W^eeden, Charles E. . '..T t'' 

r^ 7 ^ ,,, Jo \\ ave St. 

J'c/k 16, 1903 Wentworth. Louis M . ,„ r 

AA -I - o ,,., . '7 Evman St. 

T ''T^- ^^'-tman, Joseph 10 Sherman Terrace 

^Iay 20 KS9.S. Whiton, Marj Ashcroft . . . Chatsworth Hail. Ocean St. 

A><,: IS. lyo.. Whitten. Erank S Munroe St. 

.A- 19. 1903. .Uev, William A 16 Hnltinch St. 

Mayc/ib, iL)oi. Wilson, Alice X - > il 'nr\ \ ■ 

^'-./J I., 1900. Wilson, EaustinaChadwell .;;;;; ^I^ Smnme; ^: 

^...27,190.. WTson, Maude E ,00 Boston St. 

Fci,.,6,ujo:,. Winslow, Louis M \-i Xahant St. 

,, , ■ \V .nslow, Lucv li 51 Xahant St. 

Oct. 13. :9oi. W„-es, Harriet A -,, Ocean Terrace 

Whes, W. Marshall 31 Ocean Terrace 

i^.r. 23, 1899. U.therell, Eunice Sun-th Portland St. 

^//v/ 27, 1897. Witherell, Ivers I Portland St. 

,, , " ^^ood, LanaJ .9 Eranklin St. 

O.A .0. 190.. Wood, Ruth 19 Eranklin St. 

Aprzl2-j, ihc)T. Woodhurv. Charles J. H r,. Commercial St. 

^rr. 22. 1S97. Woodhurv. Jennie Russell 60 Atlantic Terrace 

^I////27. 1S97. Woodhurv. John 60 Atlantic Terrace 

\Voodhurv.John P jjo.to,, 

A/>r,/ 2f,. 1900. Woodhurv. Maria B r>, Connnercial St. 

,A//. 10. 1900. Voun.i,r. Annah A .-> (iarland .St. 

^" Voun,-. Elhrid-eS 19 CJarland St. 

*DfCe:ise(l since lon^ Aniiuul Mcitiiiy. 



74 



I.YNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



DECEASED MEMBERS. 



CiiARi.Ks Edward I'arsons. 
(JKORCiE Henry Rich. 
James Ai.ijert Breed. 
LrciAiN Newhai.l. 
Charles Smith Sweetser. 
Charles Otis Beicde. 
Martin Herrkk Hood. 
Howard Peri.ev. 

fji:()R(;E Bl'RRIEI, ClRRIER. 

Jri.iA Ann Earee. 
John Lewis Roiunson. 
Catherine Li.ovd Johnson. 
Chari.es Barker Tedisetts. 
I) \\ H) Herbert Sweetskr. 
Ehenkzer Know ETON Fogc;. 
Anna Amelia Hood. 
Amos Franklin Breed. 
Sami EL Henderson (treen. 

|oiL\ El.IiRIDCiE Hi DSON. 



Martha Lot ise Ne\\hall. 
Geor<;e Washingion Flanders. 
Edward Mai r^ Ri ssell. 
WiLLL\.M Francis Hill. 
Charles Coeein Frv. 
Josi.i'H (iooLD Brown. 
Anna .Marl\ Warren Svmonds. 
William Watters. 
Mkajah Xewhall Goodridge. 
Chakles Lot is Dow. 
Jonathan Woodward Goodell. 
Sa.mi EL i.\iGisTrs Guilford. 
Sarah Samantha Norton. 

ArTIH R SCT DDER MoORE. 

Sarah Elizaheth I^a.mi'er. 
Ei.izaueth Harney. 
LicY TcjwNE Holmes. 
Ly1)L\ CoMli Xe.\l. 



"T:nr95 



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INDIANA 


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